WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Social distance helps reduce the number of coronavirus cases, fever chart suggests

Maps of fever measurements from all over the country seem to indicate that strict social distance measures can help reduce the cases of the new coronavirus.

Kinsa Health, a medical technology company based in San Francisco, has uploaded data from hundreds of thousands of smart thermometers connected to the internet.

The company cannot specifically track the spread of the virus, as it only looks at a fever related to geographic data.

But the Map does indicate that measures, such as on-site orders and nursing homes, apart from visitors, help reduce the number of cases, decrease the number of patients in hospitals, and delay deaths, health experts say.

In fact, flu-like illnesses are so high that rates are nearly 60 percent lower than experts predicted during the pandemic

Kinsa Health collects at least 162,000 daily temperature readings from smart thermometers connected to the internet (above)

Kinsa Health collects at least 162,000 daily temperature readings from smart thermometers connected to the internet (above)

Daily fever decreases (above), indicating that strict social distance measures can help stop the spread of the coronavirus

Daily fever decreases (above), indicating that strict social distance measures can help stop the spread of the coronavirus

Daily fever decreases (above), indicating that strict social distance measures can help stop the spread of the coronavirus

Health experts say that Kinsa's map is a good way to find out where the virus is spreading as testing slowly increases. Pictured: A health care professional takes a swab from a man in a golf cart at a mobile test site in The Villages, Florida, March 23

Health experts say that Kinsa's map is a good way to find out where the virus is spreading as testing slowly increases. Pictured: A health care professional takes a swab from a man in a golf cart at a mobile test site in The Villages, Florida, March 23

Health experts say that Kinsa’s map is a good way to find out where the virus is spreading as testing slowly increases. Pictured: A health care professional takes a swab from a man in a golf cart at a mobile test site in The Villages, Florida, March 23

In the United States, there are more than 164,000 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 3,000 deaths. Pictured: EMTs load a patient into an ambulance outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City, March 27

In the United States, there are more than 164,000 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 3,000 deaths. Pictured: EMTs load a patient into an ambulance outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City, March 27

In the United States, there are more than 164,000 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 3,000 deaths. Pictured: EMTs load a patient into an ambulance outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in New York City, March 27

Kinsa has distributed over a million thermometers and receives approximately 162,000 temperature readings per day.

The thermometers upload the temperatures to a database (similar to Apple iCloud) and users can add other symptoms to an app.

“Since specific diagnostic tests are slowly turning us upside down, we’ll have to figure out other methods to find out where [the virus is] spread, “said Dr. Peter J Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, at DailyMail.com

‘I think [this] is a great method and it is a very robust technology. ‘

Before the tool was used to track COVID-19, Kinsa’s tool was usually used to track where seasonal flu outbreaks occur.

Traditionally, the company’s predictions are two or three weeks ahead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

With the coronavirus pandemic, a new feature has been added to the map, which the company calls ‘atypical’ diseases.

This follows up on diseases that do not match typical flu patterns and are likely due to the new coronavirus.

The New York Times reports that on Wednesday fever throughout the country dropped everywhere, except in two areas, one in Louisiana and one in New Mexico.

“Due to the widespread social distance, school closings, those who stay at home, etc. are declining with feverish diseases in many regions,” Kinsa wrote on March 24 on his website.

This does not mean that COVID-19 cases are decreasing. In fact, we expect reported cases to continue to increase in the short term, but it may indicate that these measures are starting to slow down their spread. ‘

But on Tuesday, each province in each state also showed that downward trend, which was indicated in four shades of blue – light blue with beetles declining by a small percentage and dark blue by a large percentage.

The Midwest and the West in particular saw the largest declines, in some counties by as much as 20 percent.

“It’s a good backup system for traditional measures and the first sure sign I’ve seen that social distance works,” said Dr. Hotez.

.

Comments
Loading...