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Sobbing baby girl covered in vomit is rescued from an SUV in 90 degree heat by Texas police

Sobbing baby covered in vomit is rescued from SUV in 90 degree heat by Texas police who smashed windows to pull her out

  • One-year-old was found alone in her mother’s 4×4 in Duncanville, Texas, Friday night
  • The police responded to a report and rescued the child, who was crying, sweating and covered in vomit
  • Police attributed the incident to a family “misunderstanding” but reported it to child protection services
  • The grand jury will determine whether an indictment should be filed in this case

A baby was found crying, sweating and covered in her own vomit after Texas police rescued her from an SUV on a scorching hot day.

According to a press release from Duncanville Police Department, agents responded to the 900 block of Gemini Avenue at about 5:00 PM Friday after receiving a call from a witness who reported a child who had been left alone and appeared to be sleeping in a parked SUV.

The officer who arrived at a scene found the child tied up in her car, scorching in the back seat. The one-year-old girl was crying, sweating and covered in vomit.

A Duncanville police officer responded to the 900 block of Gemini Avenue on Friday after receiving a report of a child sleeping alone in an SUV

A Duncanville police officer responded to the 900 block of Gemini Avenue on Friday after receiving a report of a child sleeping alone in an SUV

The officer used his baton to smash the front passenger window to open the SUV

The officer used his baton to smash the front passenger window to open the SUV

The officer used his baton to smash the front passenger window to open the SUV

As the officer’s camera video shows, he called paramedics through his portable radio, then grabbed his stick and smashed the front passenger window to access the stranded sobbing child in the back.

He then opened the back door to reveal the child dressed barefoot in a floral costume crying in her car seat.

“I know, I know, I’m sorry,” the officer in the recording overhears trying to calm the child as she unbuckles her seat belt and pulls her out of the brooding SUV.

Police say the officer placed the baby in his air-conditioned car until the paramedics arrived.

He found a one-year-old girl crying, sweating and covered in vomit in her car seat

He found a one-year-old girl crying, sweating and covered in vomit in her car seat

He found a one-year-old girl crying, sweating and covered in vomit in her car seat

The officer untied the baby, took her out of the sweltering SUV and placed her in his air-conditioned patrol car

The officer untied the baby, took her out of the sweltering SUV and placed her in his air-conditioned patrol car

The officer untied the baby, took her out of the sweltering SUV and placed her in his air-conditioned patrol car

It was about 90 degrees outside that day, meaning the SUV's interior temperature was probably over 130 degrees

It was about 90 degrees outside that day, meaning the SUV's interior temperature was probably over 130 degrees

It was about 90 degrees outside that day, meaning the SUV’s interior temperature was probably over 130 degrees

The baby girl’s mother had arrived in the same SUV from which her child had been rescued, along with the child’s grandmother and two of her older siblings.

Temperatures were in Duncaville on a Friday afternoon in the 1990s.

“All indications seem to indicate that this is a mistake caused by incorrect assumptions and poor communication about the well-being of the child,” police said.

Police referred the incident to Child Protection Services, as well as a Dallas County Grand Jury to determine whether to file civil or criminal charges.

“The Duncanville police are grateful that this incident has not led to a more tragic outcome than so many unfortunate incidents where children are left in hot vehicles,” police said. “Thanks to an alert and concerned civilian call and because of the final, swift action of Officer Pinilla, both of whom will no doubt be considered heroes by the rescued child for the rest of his life, tragedy was averted.”

Research shows that when outside temperatures range from 80 to 100 degrees, the internal temperature of a vehicle can reach 130 to 172 degrees.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, just over 50 children have died from heat stroke in vehicles in each of the past two years.

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