Snake Wrangler warns residents to expect plague numbers in Australian homes this summer

Deadly snakes are slipping into suburban homes at an alarming rate as temperatures rise in Australia

Deadly snakes are slipping into suburban homes at an alarming rate as temperatures rise in Australia.

Experts have urged residents not to remove reptiles from their properties, especially those living in southern Australia, where they have seen a variety of poisonous snakes during the past month.

"Virtually everywhere we have snakes through the suburbs, through the hills … anywhere in southern Australia, you'll find snakes," snake catcher Deb Kelly told Seven News on Tuesday.

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Deadly snakes are slipping into suburban homes at an alarming rate as temperatures rise in Australia

Deadly snakes are slipping into suburban homes at an alarming rate as temperatures rise in Australia

Gold Coast snake catcher Tony Harrison (pictured) said snakes are especially frequent in September because it's the mating season

Gold Coast snake catcher Tony Harrison (pictured) said snakes are especially frequent in September because it's the mating season

Gold Coast snake catcher Tony Harrison (pictured) said snakes are especially frequent in September because it's the mating season

Two male snakes fighting in an Australian home are the nightmare of many people

Two male snakes fighting in an Australian home are the nightmare of many people

Two male snakes fighting in an Australian home are the nightmare of many people

"They are hungry and probably a little grumpy … we discovered that most of the time, when snakes hurt people, they try to kill them or catch them," he said.

"The best advice I can give you is that you do not try to catch them yourself."

Earlier this year, Aaron Bryant, 46, died of a snake bite when he tried to snake an Eastern brown baby snake from his property in Queensland.

In case they bite you, Ms. Kelly said that people should prepare for the worst possible scenario.

"Suppose it's poisonous and you're going to die if you do not get medical assistance," he said.

Earlier this year, Aaron Bryant, 46, was killed by a snake bite when he tried to snake an Eastern brown baby snake from his Queensland property (not pictured)

Earlier this year, Aaron Bryant, 46, was killed by a snake bite when he tried to snake an Eastern brown baby snake from his Queensland property (not pictured)

Earlier this year, Aaron Bryant, 46, was killed by a snake bite when he tried to snake an Eastern brown baby snake from his Queensland property (not pictured)

Experts have urged residents not to remove reptiles from their properties

Experts have urged residents not to remove reptiles from their properties

Experts have urged residents not to remove reptiles from their properties

Gold Coast snake catcher Tony Harrison said snakes are especially frequent in September because it's the mating season.

"You'll get them everywhere," Harrison told Daily Mail Australia.

"When temperatures fall below 23 ° C, you do not see many, they slow down," he added.

"They have not left, they just are not as obvious as they usually are, but as soon as the weather heats up, they are much more active, which is what is happening at the moment."

Reptiles are also very active at Christmas when they go in search of food, and in April when they prepare to slow down during the winter.

Reptiles are also quite active at Christmas when they go in search of food, and in April when they prepare to slow down in winter, Mr. Harrison (pictured) said

Reptiles are also quite active at Christmas when they go in search of food, and in April when they prepare to slow down in winter, Mr. Harrison (pictured) said

Reptiles are also quite active at Christmas when they go in search of food, and in April when they prepare to slow down in winter, Mr. Harrison (pictured) said

The figures reveal that 103 people showed up at the Townsville Hospital emergency department with snakebites in the past fiscal year, according to the Department of Health.

The figures reveal that 103 people showed up at the Townsville Hospital emergency department with snakebites in the past fiscal year, according to the Department of Health.

The figures reveal that 103 people showed up at the Townsville Hospital emergency department with snakebites in the past fiscal year, according to the Department of Health.

HOW TO AVOID SNAKES THIS SEASON

Remove water bowls from pets from entry or exit points as they may attract thirsty snakes

Keep the doors closed in good weather and make sure there are no holes in the screens

Try to reduce the number of rats or mice in the home by removing pet food that has not eaten

Trim the protruding plants and eliminate bushes or weeds that grow too much

Do not leave your shoes at the door

Keep the shelves at least 30 centimeters off the ground, especially in the shed or garage

Wear leather gloves when working in the garden or at home

Do not try to attack a snake if you encounter one, as this will only aggravate the reptile, making it more likely to bite

Watch your movements from a distance and call a professional to remove it

Harrison said that many people incorrectly identify snakes, so he recommends taking a picture and sending it to a receiver before doing anything.

"It's hard for an average person to say which," he said.

& # 39; If you see a snake, do not go and shake it, take a picture from a distance.

"It is a human nature to remove a snake, what will happen is that the snake will defend itself, and that snake could take you to the hospital.

"Many people make mistakes and end up in the hospital."

The figures reveal that 103 people showed up at the Townsville Hospital emergency department with snakebites in the previous fiscal year, according to the Department of Health.

Despite the alarming figures, Andrew Melrose of Shire Snake Catchers Engadine said that biting is often the "last resort" of a snake and strictly defensive.

"The best advice I give someone is to avoid a mouthful, if you see it the best thing is to just leave it alone: ​​call the experts and do not try to catch it or kill it because the snakes usually (would not be interested) in you. & # 39;

Despite the alarming numbers, Andrew Melrose, of Shire Snake Catchers Engadine, said that biting is often the "last resort" of a snake and is strictly defensive.

Despite the alarming numbers, Andrew Melrose, of Shire Snake Catchers Engadine, said that biting is often the "last resort" of a snake and is strictly defensive.

Despite the alarming numbers, Andrew Melrose, of Shire Snake Catchers Engadine, said that biting is often the "last resort" of a snake and is strictly defensive.

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