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Snake warning for Australians with sightings are on the rise

Urgent warning for Australians and their pets as snake sightings skyrocket

  • Australians are being warned that there are increasing snake sightings
  • On the Central Coast, NSW, a snake catcher said he averaged six calls a day
  • Last week, a man from western Sydney was admitted to hospital with a brown snake bite

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A massive increase in snake sightings has prompted an urgent warning for millions of Australians and their pets as the torrid reptiles venture into backyards in search of food.

Rising temperatures on Australia’s east coast have seen snakes come out and about as they look for a mate and a meal now the winter cold is over.

While snakes do not hibernate during the colder months, they do enter a state known as ‘brumation’ where they will sleep for long periods, which means they are less active and thusore hunting less.

In New South Wales, snake sightings in particular are on the rise, as a man in western Sydney was taken to hospital last week after being bitten by a brown snake.

The man, in his 30s, was bitten at the Lizard Log nature playground in Abbotsbury in the Western Sydney Parklands, a popular spot for families.

Australians are being warned to be extra careful with their movements and their pets as snake sightings increase as temperatures begin to rise (stock image)

Australians are being warned to be extra careful with their movements and their pets as snake sightings increase as temperatures begin to rise (stock image)

Central Coast snake catcher Matt Stopford said he receives about six calls a day to remove snakes from homes or backyards

Central Coast snake catcher Matt Stopford said he receives about six calls a day to remove snakes from homes or backyards

Central Coast snake catcher Matt Stopford said he receives about six calls a day to remove snakes from homes or backyards

Meanwhile on the Central Coast, snake catcher Matt Stopford said 9 News he receives about six calls a day to remove snakes from homes or backyards.

“The moment they’re just coming out of stiffness, they start to warm up and they’re on the move and start looking for mates and food,” said Mr. Stop drive.

He warned anyone who saw a snake to keep their distance and not to catch or kill them and instead call a snake catcher.

“Catching or killing a snake in NSW without a license can result in a fine of up to $10,000 and or ten years in prison,” Mr. Stop drive.

He warned anyone who saw a snake to keep their distance and not to catch or kill them and instead call a snake catcher

He warned anyone who saw a snake to keep their distance and not to catch or kill them and instead call a snake catcher

He warned anyone who saw a snake to keep their distance and not to catch or kill them and instead call a snake catcher

Natasha Evans, from the Animal Referral Hospital in Gosford, also warned pet owners to be vigilant after a cattle dog required anti-venom and a transfusion after being bitten by a red-bellied black snake.

“Often they’ll have some signs immediately after they’re bitten, they might throw up, they might collapse, sometimes they’ll seem like they’re not quite right,” Natasha Evans said.

Sydney vet Dr. Tim Montgomery took to Facebook to also tell the owners to be vigilant.

‘Dogs are curious and they find snakes very exciting. There are no foolproof ways to protect your dogs from snake bites,’ he said.

“If you find your dog has been outside and it comes in and is acting strange, and if you live in an area where there may be snakes, visit your local vet just to be safe.”

He said that while symptoms of snakebite can vary depending on the species, some signs to look out for include: wobble, tremors, vomiting, restlessness, limping and visible wounds.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE BITTEN BY A POISONOUS SNAKE

The Australian Resuscitation Council recommends the ‘pressure immobilisation’ technique:

– Apply a wide pressure bandage firmly and tightly

– To reduce blood flow and delay venom spread, apply an additional bandage starting at the fingers and toes and covering as much of the limb as possible

– Splint the limb including joints on both sides of the bite to limit limb movement

– Keep the bite victim and the limb completely still

– Bring transport to the victim if possible

– Transport the victim to medical attention, preferably by ambulance

– If alone, apply the pressure immobilization bandage as completely as possible over the bite site and affected limb and remain motionless until help arrives

DO NOT wash the area of ​​the bite or try to suck out the venom:

It is extremely important to retain traces of poison for use with poison identification kits.

DO NOT incise or cut the bite or apply a high tourniquet:

Cutting or cutting into the bite will not help. High tourniquets are ineffective and can be fatal if released.

Source: The Australian Resuscitation Council

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