Advertisements
Consumers have expressed their fear of this "frightening spyware" and suggest that it is a threat to privacy because Alexa can hear and record what users are saying - and can pick up conversations within hearing distance

Amazon unveiled a whole host of new devices at an event this week, one of which is sparkling fears for an "Orwellian" world.

Advertisements

These smart glasses with Alexa are called Echo Frames and have small microphones built into the frame with which the wearer can hear and hear the personal assistant.

Consumers have expressed their fear of this "frightening spyware" and suggest that it is a threat to privacy because Alexa can hear and record what users say – and can pick up conversations within hearing distance.

Scroll down for video

Consumers have expressed their fear of this "frightening spyware" and suggest that it is a threat to privacy because Alexa can hear and record what users are saying - and can pick up conversations within hearing distance

Consumers have expressed their fear of this "frightening spyware" and suggest that it is a threat to privacy because Alexa can hear and record what users are saying – and can pick up conversations within hearing distance

Amazon has pitched its new Echo Frames so that users have hands-free access to Alexa.

Advertisements

You can hear notifications and alerts, activate smart home or call a friend, & # 39; all without removing your phone & # 39 ;.

The glasses are designed with open-ear technology that pushes sound directly to your ear, but leaves your ears uncovered so that the world around is not blocked.

Pairing the frames with the Alexa app and Amazon shared that the microphones can be turned off by pressing the action button on the side twice – because the company wants to protect the privacy of its users.

Amazon unveiled a whole host of new devices at an event this week, with a sparkling fear of an "Orwellian" world

Amazon unveiled a whole host of new devices at an event this week, with a sparkling fear of an "Orwellian" world

Amazon unveiled a whole host of new devices at an event this week, with a sparkling fear of an "Orwellian" world

Joseph Jerome, an independent privacy consultant, told DailyMail.com in an email: & # 39; Echo Frames are an interesting product, although they may be more new than anything else. & # 39;

& # 39; I think this is a new attempt to try and find new form factors for on-the-go connectivity outside the phone, and all types of headsets look like the future. & # 39;

Advertisements

"Technical companies and financiers are betting big on AR / VR and so-called mixed reality, and everyone can see the potential of an audio-driven heads-up display.

Amazon has pitched its new Echo Frames so that users have hands-free access to Alexa. You can hear notifications and alerts, activate smart home or call a friend, & # 39; all without removing your phone & # 39; - comparable to technology from the Netflix series & # 39; Black Mirror & # 39;

Amazon has pitched its new Echo Frames so that users have hands-free access to Alexa. You can hear notifications and alerts, activate smart home or call a friend, & # 39; all without removing your phone & # 39; - comparable to technology from the Netflix series & # 39; Black Mirror & # 39;

Amazon has pitched its new Echo Frames so that users have hands-free access to Alexa. You can hear notifications and alerts, activate smart home or call a friend, & # 39; all without removing your phone & # 39; – comparable to technology from the Netflix series & # 39; Black Mirror & # 39;

The device only costs $ 180, but & # 39; Ahmed & # 39; wrote: & # 39; Don't be appeased, the $$ is in the data they collect from you & # 39;

The device only costs $ 180, but & # 39; Ahmed & # 39; wrote: & # 39; Don't be appeased, the $$ is in the data they collect from you & # 39;

The device only costs $ 180, but & # 39; Ahmed & # 39; wrote: & # 39; Don't be appeased, the $$ is in the data they collect from you & # 39;

Advertisements

& # 39; That is where we are going, and it clearly presents both huge data collection issues regarding the carrier and privacy implications for what that technology will eventually perceive. & # 39;

Many consumers flocked to Twitter after the release of Echo Frames to express their fears about these "data-stealing" glasses.

"Spyware frightening. It is deeply wrong to bear this nonsense. It violates both my freedom and yours, & Twitter user Sam Jordison wrote.

The device only costs $ 180, but & # 39; Ahmed & # 39; wrote: & # 39; Don't be appeased, the $$ is in the data they collect from you & # 39 ;.

The user "razz" noted that "it does not become more personal than glasses on your face or unexpectedly than a ring. Depending on the sensors that each device has, we can find out what data is collected by @Amazon to compensate for those low prices & # 39 ;.

Advertisements

Another joke was that these glasses are part of an episode & # 39; Stream your life to Amazon & # 39 ;.

Pairing the frames with the Alexa app and Amazon shared that the microphones can be turned off by pressing the action button on the side twice - because the company wants to protect the privacy of its users

Pairing the frames with the Alexa app and Amazon shared that the microphones can be turned off by pressing the action button on the side twice - because the company wants to protect the privacy of its users

Pairing the frames with the Alexa app and Amazon shared that the microphones can be turned off by pressing the action button on the side twice – because the company wants to protect the privacy of its users

"Echo Frames are just another manifestation of Echo in general," wrote Jerome.

"These devices are not intended to listen to conversations; they are meant to listen to key words and respond accordingly.

Advertisements

"Now we've seen clear stories about where that went wrong."

Other users believe that Amazon deliberately sells Echo Frames for a low price

Other users believe that Amazon deliberately sells Echo Frames for a low price

Other users believe that Amazon deliberately sells Echo Frames for a low price

"At the moment, voice assistants make mistakes and can activate them at the wrong time.

"That's part of the reason the technology companies were reviewing audio records to try to understand what might unintentionally surprise Alexa.

"There is also a motivation to collect audio data to better improve speech assistants, but that is not the same as listening to conversations."

Some Twitter users have joked about the privacy issues surrounding Echo Frames

Some Twitter users have joked about the privacy issues surrounding Echo Frames

Some Twitter users have joked about the privacy issues surrounding Echo Frames

Many know for sure that Amazon uses this device to collect their data

Many know for sure that Amazon uses this device to collect their data

Many know for sure that Amazon uses this device to collect their data

Advertisements

"I don't think consumers should worry in general, but I don't think people should, but smart assistants in their bedrooms."

"If the concern is that these devices are recording conversations or somehow helping us to profile ourselves with regard to our most sensitive activities, then I just notice that bedrooms are a particularly intimate area."

"It's not that people shouldn't do that, but if we're really worried about Orwellian surveillance, where we put these devices in our homes, it's important."

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail