Small town in North Carolina prepares for storm surges after Hurricane Florence

The small town of Lumberton, North Carolina, prepared for the floods on Saturday as the incessant rains of Hurricane Florence threatened to cause swells. In the photo: Keawana Parker, 27, and her children barbecue on the back porch after losing electricity

The small town of Lumberton prepared for Saturday's floods as the incessant rains of Hurricane Florence threatened to cause storms.

The Lumber River had overflowed and was rising when Florence sat on the area more than 24 hours after it first made landfall.

So far, there have been eight storm-related deaths and today President Trump issued a disaster declaration for parts of the state.

In Lumberton, a small town that is still recovering in parts of Hurricane Matthew two years ago, many residents seemed to have listened to the warnings of the authorities and had left the city.

Many houses were boarded up and surrounded by sandbags. Downtown streets were deserted and businesses were closed. Some had suffered damage to their awnings due to strong winds, which had reached speeds of 100 mph.

In the Turner Estates RV park, many of the units had taken floodwaters and the nearby New Point Baptist Church was also submerged.

The small town of Lumberton, North Carolina, prepared for the floods on Saturday as the incessant rains of Hurricane Florence threatened to cause swells. In the photo: Keawana Parker, 27, and her children barbecue on the back porch after losing electricity

The small town of Lumberton, North Carolina, prepared for the floods on Saturday as the incessant rains of Hurricane Florence threatened to cause swells. In the photo: Keawana Parker, 27, and her children barbecue on the back porch after losing electricity

Residents arrive at the local service station amidst rainy weather and strong winds as Hurricane Florence passes through Lumberton

Residents arrive at the local service station amidst rainy weather and strong winds as Hurricane Florence passes through Lumberton

Residents arrive at the local service station amidst rainy weather and strong winds as Hurricane Florence passes through Lumberton

A church sign shows the words & # 39; Florence & # 39; and & # 39; Pray & # 39; while Lumberton prepares for storms

A church sign shows the words & # 39; Florence & # 39; and & # 39; Pray & # 39; while Lumberton prepares for storms

A church sign shows the words & # 39; Florence & # 39; and & # 39; Pray & # 39; while Lumberton prepares for storms

The Lumber River could be seen rising on Saturday after the incessant rains overnight

The Lumber River could be seen rising on Saturday after the incessant rains overnight

The Lumber River could be seen rising on Saturday after the incessant rains overnight

At his home in downtown Lumberton, Keawana Parker, 27, and his children Nassiyah, eight, Keyazha, nine and Kyrin two, had lost power and were beginning to roast all the food in the refrigerator. Her friend, Ellen Davis, 46, had escaped from her home and believed she would be flooded.

Keawana told DailyMail.com: "We are preparing pork chops, chicken and hot dogs, we can not let the food go bad, we could use it too. There are also many more of us. We have 10 people in a house.

"I think we passed that wind, so we're fine now." Ellen added: "I live in the Turner RV park, and I came here. We are simply concerned about the floods now, we will worry about our homes when the storm disappears. "

Keawana Parker stokes the fire outside her home while she and her friend Ellen Davis, 46, prepare to eat the rest of their refrigerator's food so it will not go bad after the electricity is cut off.

Keawana Parker stokes the fire outside her home while she and her friend Ellen Davis, 46, prepare to eat the rest of their refrigerator's food so it will not go bad after the electricity is cut off.

Keawana Parker stokes the fire outside her home while she and her friend Ellen Davis, 46, prepare to eat the rest of their refrigerator's food so it will not go bad after the electricity is cut off.

Keawana Parker stokes the fire outside her home while she and her friend Ellen Davis, 46, prepare to eat the rest of their refrigerator's food so it will not go bad after the electricity is cut off.

Keawana Parker stokes the fire outside her home while she and her friend Ellen Davis, 46, prepare to eat the rest of their refrigerator's food so it will not go bad after the electricity is cut off.

The windows of a store in the center were boarded up in front of the threatening hurricane

The windows of a store in the center were boarded up in front of the threatening hurricane

The windows of a store in the center were boarded up in front of the threatening hurricane

A destroyed billboard can be seen along I-95 North Carolina after the storm

A destroyed billboard can be seen along I-95 North Carolina after the storm

A destroyed billboard can be seen along I-95 North Carolina after the storm

Hurricane Florence may have been degraded to a tropical storm, but on Saturday afternoon it continued to unleash hell on the residents of North Carolina.

More than 24 hours after it first made landfall in the state, the storm has moved almost to a stop in the region, traveling as slowly as 2 mph at one point.

The slow progression of the meteorological system combined with constant rain and storm surges has caused relief efforts to be delayed and families to be told that they still can not return to their homes in the evacuated areas.

There were eight deaths so far in the storm, and on Saturday morning President Trump issued a disaster declaration for parts of the state that will facilitate the reconstruction process for residents in some counties.

He is planning to visit the area next week.

Demolished: The number of people without electricity in North Carolina is approaching one million, and it is likely to take weeks to restore electricity in some parts, a tree that took a home in Wilson, North Carolina on Friday.

Demolished: The number of people without electricity in North Carolina is approaching one million, and it is likely to take weeks to restore electricity in some parts, a tree that took a home in Wilson, North Carolina on Friday.

Demolished: The number of people without electricity in North Carolina is approaching one million, and it is likely to take weeks to restore electricity in some parts, a tree that took a home in Wilson, North Carolina on Friday.

The river runs through it: the Neuse River floods a street in New Bern, North Carolina on Friday afternoon (above)

The river runs through it: the Neuse River floods a street in New Bern, North Carolina on Friday afternoon (above)

The river runs through it: the Neuse River floods a street in New Bern, North Carolina on Friday afternoon (above)

Florence's power dropped rapidly as it approached land, but the slow advance of the 300-mile storm across the region could leave much of the area underwater in the coming days.

Tens of thousands of people who were evacuated from their homes remain in shelters throughout the state after being asked to stay away from their homes.

It is necessary to clean and dangerous electrical cables have been knocked down in some parts of the state, especially in Wilmington.

In total, 40 inches of rain could fall in parts of North Carolina before the storm finally passes through the state.

The winds have dropped drastically, but the catastrophic flood has not improved, and the storm is moving at an icy pace.

Cleanup: Florence has been degraded to tropical storm and winds were less than 50 mph on Saturday afternoon, but the weather system was moving at 2 mph (soldiers with Marine Wing Support Squadron 272 shot down a tree at Marine Corps Air Station New River )

Cleanup: Florence has been degraded to tropical storm and winds were less than 50 mph on Saturday afternoon, but the weather system was moving at 2 mph (soldiers with Marine Wing Support Squadron 272 shot down a tree at Marine Corps Air Station New River )

Cleanup: Florence has been degraded to tropical storm and winds were less than 50 mph on Saturday afternoon, but the weather system was moving at 2 mph (soldiers with Marine Wing Support Squadron 272 shot down a tree at Marine Corps Air Station New River )

Rescued with pets: a woman who tried to get out of the storm was one of the many rescued in New Bern on Friday (above)

Rescued with pets: a woman who tried to get out of the storm was one of the many rescued in New Bern on Friday (above)

Rescued with pets: a woman who tried to get out of the storm was one of the many rescued in New Bern on Friday (above)

It begins: A look at Wilmington, North Carolina when the storm began to approach the earth on Thursday night (above)

It begins: A look at Wilmington, North Carolina when the storm began to approach the earth on Thursday night (above)

It begins: A look at Wilmington, North Carolina when the storm began to approach the earth on Thursday night (above)

A mother and her baby were killed when a tree fell at their home in Wilmington. The injured father of the child was hospitalized.

A woman in Hampstead, North Carolina, died of a heart attack after calling 911 when emergency crews could not get to her home due to fallen trees blocking the street.

An unidentified person died while at a local high school that had become a refuge in Brunswick County, North Carolina. That death is still under investigation.

A 78-year-old man was electrocuted while trying to connect extension cords, while another man, 77, died when he was knocked down by strong winds while controlling his hunting dogs.

Both deaths occurred in Kinston.

Two deaths were also reported on Harker & # 39; s Island, which were revealed as murder for the murder of husband and wife.

Officials in New Bern, dating from the early eighteenth century, said more than 100 people were rescued from the floods and that the city center was under water on Friday afternoon.

From Above: Officials in New Bern, dating from the early 18th century, said more than 100 people were rescued from the floods and that the city center was under water on Friday afternoon.

From Above: Officials in New Bern, dating from the early 18th century, said more than 100 people were rescued from the floods and that the city center was under water on Friday afternoon.

From Above: Officials in New Bern, dating from the early 18th century, said more than 100 people were rescued from the floods and that the city center was under water on Friday afternoon.

Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten & # 39; Survivor & # 39; are rescued from the floods in New Bern, North Carolina

Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten & # 39; Survivor & # 39; are rescued from the floods in New Bern, North Carolina

Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten & # 39; Survivor & # 39; are rescued from the floods in New Bern, North Carolina

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