SMALL LAYER MOVEMENTS: scuppers of volcanic activity Great Western Mining's search for gold

Anticlimax: the stock price of Great Western Mining fell more than 40% this week

There is gold in the hills, only the problem is that we can not access it.

That was indeed the headache for Great Western Mining, whose shares fell 43 percent this week.

The company is exploring the M2 Prospect on the northwest flank of Black Mountain, in Mineral County, Nevada.

Anticlimax: the stock price of Great Western Mining fell more than 40% this week

Anticlimax: the stock price of Great Western Mining fell more than 40% this week

Exploration in the language of mining usually means sticking a large reddish drill into the ground to extract samples of what is found hundreds of feet below the surface.

Great Western was trying to locate gold and copper.

The only flaw in an otherwise impeccable plan was that the geological gods were against the GW team.

The volcanic activity that occurred thousands of years ago and that led experts to believe that there is an underground reward of copper and gold has effectively created a thick and impenetrable barrier.

It meant that the drill could not test the mineralized zone.

GW is moving the platform a few hundred meters and it will start again.

Many will think that the subsequent sale is precipitous and disproportionate to the apparent error.

However, it only shows the binary nature of the exploration of natural resources and the implacable that seems to be the failure of the investing public, even if it is a minor error instead of an abject one.

Solid performance: Oilex shares almost doubled in value on Friday

Solid performance: Oilex shares almost doubled in value on Friday

Solid performance: Oilex shares almost doubled in value on Friday

Moving lot: It was a poor week for energy firm Sabien Technology, which said it was unlikely to reach its year-end balance target

Moving lot: It was a poor week for energy firm Sabien Technology, which said it was unlikely to reach its year-end balance target

Moving lot: It was a poor week for energy firm Sabien Technology, which said it was unlikely to reach its year-end balance target

It was a flat week for AIM All Share, which hovered around 1,088. The FTSE 100, on the other hand, achieved a positive performance, pushing around 20 points higher to 7,684.

It was a poor week for energy firm Sabien Technology, which said it was unlikely it would reach its year-end balance target and that it would probably need to raise fresh funds.

The news took a share of 38 percent of the stock price, which has fallen about 85 percent in value over the past year.

One wonders what the Abzena biological sciences group has to do to make the price of their actions go in the right direction.

The news this week was quite positive: it has developed an antibody that adheres to a new cancer drug developed by Faron Pharma that should make the treatment more effective.

The development was received by the collective "meh" of the market, since shares fell by 18 percent.

Compare Abzena's performance with Faron's, the other name in the press release, with the latter's share price at 50 percent.

Okay, there are two things here: Faron was coming up from a low base after his main drug failed in clinical trials.

But just as the joint launch did not seem to justify the fall in the price of Abzena's shares, it did not really seem like the kind of good news that would propel Faron into the sky.

One wonders if the increase is anticipating some other more material event. One can only guess.

Shares in Oilex almost doubled in value on Friday amid hopes that a nasty dispute with Gujarat State Petroleum Company, its drilling partner in India, is close to a resolution.

Reading the tea leaves, it seems that the investors were taking as a good sign the stop to the trade that has been called to the Australian actions of the Anglo-Australian oilfield developer.

The purchase of shares by the director gave an increase of 33% to the price of the e-Therapeutics shares, while Imaginatik rose 30% after agreeing a financing agreement with the new investment vehicle of the serial technology entrepreneur Vin Murray

Finally, it was a good week for Haydale Graphene Industries, which climbed about 22 percent amid institutional interest.

Earlier in the week, it emerged that Quilter has been building stakes and now has 5 percent of the innovator, which creates new materials that contain the new graphene, wonderful material.

The name of Quilter is, of course, an explosion of the past. Those with long enough memories will remember Quilter Goodison, the company that used to be run in the 1980s by the former stock exchange chairman, Sir Nicholas Goodison. That was before its sale in 1986 to Commercial Union (now part of Aviva).

Well, today the name of Quilter has been dusted off as the new nickname of the investment giant formerly known as Old Mutual.

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