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Images from NASA & Landsat show that the island has gradually declined in recent years since it was first formed. Traces of mud and sediment seen in the images indicate that it was steadily declining, while waves and tides affected the structure. Now it cannot be seen from above

The disappearing island: satellite images reveal a tiny piece of land created by a mud volcano off the coast of Pakistan and was swallowed up only six years after it was formed

  • Island, called Zalzala Koh (meaning "Earthquake Mountain" in Urdu), arose after a 7.7 million quake in 2013
  • It is located in a bay near the city of Gwadar, off the coast of Western Pakistan, and is only 90 meters wide
  • Scientists say it was a product of a mud volcano caused by an earthquake in September of that year
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An island that was discovered only six years ago by a series of natural disasters has once again been swallowed up by the sea.

In 2013, after an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.7 and the subsequent mud volcano, scientists noticed a new, oval-shaped island off the coast of Western Pakistan.

It was only 90 meters wide and experts predicted that it would not be long.

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Satellite images taken in the last six years show the progress of the island with a short lifespan, from the moment it surfaced until it disappeared.

Images from NASA & Landsat show that the island has gradually declined in recent years since it was first formed. Traces of mud and sediment seen in the images indicate that it was steadily declining, while waves and tides affected the structure. Now it cannot be seen from above

Images from NASA & Landsat show that the island has gradually declined in recent years since it was first formed. Traces of mud and sediment seen in the images indicate that it was steadily declining, while waves and tides affected the structure. Now it cannot be seen from above

The island, called Zalzala Koh (which means & # 39; Earthquake Mountain & # 39; in Urdu), was 20 meters high, 90 meters wide and 40 meters long when it appeared in a bay near the town of Gwadar in 2013.

Scientists say it was a product of a mud volcano caused by an earthquake in September of that year.

Mud volcanoes are a common phenomenon in the area due to tectonics of plates, where the Arabic plate sinks under the Eurasian plate.

& # 39; The rapid accumulation of soft, clay-rich sediments along the edge of the Eurasian plate in combination with the high tectonic stresses, cause a sharp build-up of water pressure and gases trapped in the sedimentary rock & # 39 ;, says University of Adelaide geologist Mark Tingay.

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"A mud volcano is created when the fluid pressure becomes large enough to break the overlying rocks that seal this intense pressure, causing the mud and gases to burst to the surface."

Images from NASA & Landsat show that the island has gradually declined in recent years since it was first formed.

Traces of mud and sediment seen in the images indicate that it was steadily declining, while waves and tides affected the structure.

In 2013, after an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.7 and the subsequent mud volcano, scientists noticed a new, oval-shaped island off the coast of Western Pakistan. It was only 90 meters wide and experts predicted that it would not be long

In 2013, after an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.7 and the subsequent mud volcano, scientists noticed a new, oval-shaped island off the coast of Western Pakistan. It was only 90 meters wide and experts predicted that it would not be long

In 2013, after an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.7 and the subsequent mud volcano, scientists noticed a new, oval-shaped island off the coast of Western Pakistan. It was only 90 meters wide and experts predicted that it would not be long

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According to NASA, the island hardly broke the waterline at the end of 2016.

And by the time spring came this year, it was no longer visible above the surface.

"Zalzala Koh may be out of sight now, but that doesn't mean it's completely gone," says NASA.

"In 2019, hints of the island will continue to exist in Landsat images."

For example, last month, satellite images made of sediment around the sunken base of the island, the space agency notes.

WHAT ARE TECTONIC PLATES?

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Tectonic plates are composed of the earth's crust and the upper part of the mantle.

Below is the asthenosphere: the warm, viscous rock conveyor on which tectonic plates run.

The earth has fifteen tectonic plates (photo) that together have shaped the shape of the landscape that we see around us today

The earth has fifteen tectonic plates (photo) that together have shaped the shape of the landscape that we see around us today

The earth has fifteen tectonic plates (photo) that together have shaped the shape of the landscape that we see around us today

Earthquakes usually occur at the boundaries of tectonic plates, where one plate protrudes below another, pushes another up, or where the plate edges scrape past each other.

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Earthquakes rarely occur in the center of plates, but they can happen when old faults or fissures reactivate far below the surface.

These areas are relatively weak compared to the surrounding plate and can easily slip and cause an earthquake.

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