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Slew of negative cannabis studies reveal teen addicts, unhealthy relationships and more car crashes

The number of injured in car accidents has risen nearly six percent in states that have legalized recreational cannabis use – the latest study in a series of negative reports to sound the alarm about the dangers of decriminalization.

Research this week, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety revealed a 5.8 percent increase in road accidents in Colorado, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada after those states legalized cannabis and created “pot shops.”

It was the latest in a series of investigations on everything from teen addiction to injuries and unhealthy relationships, to cast doubt on this week’s Democratic effort to end federal cannabis bans.

“The legalization of marijuana does not come without a cost,” said Charles Farmer, the principal investigator of the car accident study, which compared traffic data from 2009 to 2019 in states that both legalized and maintained the drug.

Legalization “removes the stigma of using marijuana” and makes it readily available, leading to more intoxicated and less observant drivers with slower reaction times and a tendency to move out of their lane, he said.

Overall, the five states mentioned saw a 4.1 percent increase in fatalities. The increases were not universal. The worst-hit state, Colorado, saw a 17.8 percent increase in crash injuries. In California, incidents rose by 5.7 percent.

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Cannabis is slowly being legalized in America, with use in one form or another allowed in all but six states of the US

Cannabis is slowly being legalized in America, with use in one form or another allowed in all but six states of the US

“States that legalize recreational use of marijuana must make it very clear, through education and strict enforcement, that not all uses are legal,” Farmer told DailyMail.com.

Experts focus on dangers of cannabis legalization

Car Accident Rates Rise 5.8% in Colorado, Washington, Oregon, California After Legalization

Only Colorado saw a shocking 17.8 percent increase in crash injuries

Cannabis use grows ‘significantly’ after legalization and people are unaware of health risks, says New York study

Children as young as nine are curious about trying cannabis – often because of cues from parents and peers

Teens are more than three times more likely than adults to become addicted to cannabis

Cannabis users are 22 percent more likely to end up in a hospital emergency room than others

Users “misperceive” how well their romantic relationships are going, and are more critical, demanding, defensive, and negative when rowing with loved ones

UN says legalization of cannabis has ‘accelerated’ its use and increased the risk of depression and suicide

Another study this week from The City University of New York and Columbia University — in a state that legalized recreational marijuana last year but hasn’t yet let it be sold through pharmacies — found cannabis use is growing faster after legalization.

Professor Renee Goodwin, the study’s lead author, said cannabis use was “significantly more common” in states where recreational use was legal and warned of a “potential explosion” for users as it was treated as normal.

She warned against states that ‘quickly pass legislation’ without letting people know how to safely use cannabis and of its ‘potential health risks’ – whether smoked in joints, vaporized or eaten as edible gummies.

A University of Michigan study this month, the alarm sounded that kids as young as nine were becoming curious about trying marijuana. Many were influenced by “messages from parents” who didn’t regulate drug use, researchers said.

Also this month, University College London and King’s College London researchers revealed that adolescents were more than three times more likely than adults to become addicted to cannabis, increasing their risk of depression or anxiety.

Another study from Canada, where cannabis use has risen since it was decriminalized in 2018, found that users of the drug were 22 percent more likely to end up in a hospital emergency room than others — often due to serious injury or breathing problems.

Lead author Dr. Nicholas Vozoris, of the University of Toronto, said responsible officials should discourage “recreational use” and “remind citizens of the harmful effects of cannabis on health,” he said last month.

The UN’s Annual World Drug report last month warned against legalizing cannabis, saying it “accelerated” its use and increased the risk of depression and suicide. The world body also said the booming multi-billion dollar cannabis industry was producing increasingly potent products.

An unusual study last month from Rutgers University found that cannabis users ‘misperceive’ how well their romantic relationships are going, and tend to be more critical, demanding, defensive and negative when rowing with loved ones.

Even the oft-touted benefits of cannabis are being questioned. Researchers at Oregon Health and Science University last month reported there was ‘very little scientifically substantiated’ evidence that cannabis-related products relieved chronic pain in patients.

The wealth of research can be seen as a wake-up call in a country that is increasingly tolerant and even proponent of cannabis use – even walking a few blocks away in New York or San Francisco often leaves you with a nose full of pungent marijuana smoke. .

Nearly half of all US citizens now live in states where they can purchase cannabis from a recreational market, and all but 13 states have legalized medical use. President Joe Biden said this month that marijuana users should not go to jail.

Pro-legalization campaigners have slowly won the debate over the past few decades, with 58 percent of Americans now in favor of legalization, compared to the 28 percent who oppose, according to a YouGov poll this month.

Poll

Should the federal government lift the ban on cannabis?

This week, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer introduced a bill to decriminalize marijuana at the federal level.

The Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level, allow states to make their own laws and enact government oversight regulations similar to those for tobacco and alcohol. The bill’s approval is far from certain.

Scott Chipman, of the campaign group Americans Against Legalizing Marijuana, warned of the push for legalization and its “many negative and dangerous” effects on millions of Americans.

His group points to a myriad of social problems, from violent crime to mental illness, young addicts, marijuana companies that produce super-strength drugs and target children, as well as more drunk drivers on the road.

“It’s especially concerning how the marijuana user affects the lives of the people around them,” Chipman told DailyMail.com.

‘Ask yourself, at what level of consumption would you feel safe as a passenger in a car with a driver taking a psychotropic drug?’

This example of wreckless driving in Draper, Utah, in June 2019 was linked to a motorist using Xanax and marijuana.  States like Colorado that have legalized cannabis use have seen more road injuries and deaths

This example of wreckless driving in Draper, Utah, in June 2019 was linked to a motorist using Xanax and marijuana. States like Colorado that have legalized cannabis use have seen more road injuries and deaths

A woman who was under the influence of marijuana when she caused a head-on collision in San Diego, California, in March 2016, which killed a passenger in another car, was later convicted of aggravated manslaughter under the influence of alcohol.

A woman who was under the influence of marijuana when she caused a head-on collision in San Diego, California, in March 2016, which killed a passenger in another car, was later convicted of aggravated manslaughter under the influence of alcohol.

Senator Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on Thursday introduced a bill that would federally decriminalize marijuana and allow states to make their own rules for the cannabis industry.

Charles Farmer says car accident injuries and deaths have increased in states where recreational cannabis is legal

Senator Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on Thursday introduced a bill that would federally decriminalize marijuana and allow states to make their own rules for the cannabis industry. Researcher Charles Farmer (right) says car accident injuries and deaths have increased in states where recreational cannabis is legal

Leo Paquette, owner of Fire on Fore, a medical marijuana dispensary in Portland, Maine.  These kinds of retailers have set up stores in the US as the rules against cannabis are relaxed

Leo Paquette, owner of Fire on Fore, a medical marijuana dispensary in Portland, Maine. These kinds of retailers have set up stores in the US as the rules against cannabis are relaxed

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