Sky & # 39; s Kay Burley kicks Tory MP David Davies of the TV debate on the Brexit after he visits the woman

Tory MP David Davies today started a live TV debate about the Brexit after he visited Labor Member of Parliament Anna Turley (pictured together on the show today) & # 39; & # 39; by checking his mobile phone in the middle of the fiery debate

A Tory MP today started a live TV debate about the Brexit after he visited a female politician & # 39; by checking his mobile phone in the middle of the debate.

David Davies, a Brexiteer, went into talk with Labor MP and Remainer Anna Turley on Sky News this afternoon to discuss the threatening departure of Britain.

But the two deputies got into a bad mood when they clashed about what Brexit means for jobs and the economy.

Halfway through the interview, Mr. Davies took a bored look and pulled out his cell phone after complaining that he could not say a word about it.

He turned to Mrs. Turley and presenter Kay Burley and said, "Go ahead, I'll check my phone while you have your little conversation." and pulled his cellphone out of the pocket of his suit.

Kay then interrupted her to knock down the MP and said: & # 39; Do not be patronizing. That is completely unacceptable. Please do not talk to her like that. & # 39;

Mr. Davies answered, "I am not patronizing, but I can not get word of it here."

Kay hit back and said: "Please do not talk to her that way, it is not acceptable. You've each had 50 percent. & # 39; The clearly irritated Tory MP buttoned up in his jacket, he added: "Okay, you're going through."

Kay stepped inside and kicked her set, shook his hand and sent him away with the words: Thank you for coming to us, we really appreciate it. & # 39;

MPs are bitterly divided over the Brexit and Parliament is in a total impasse on what to do – despite calls from the public for MPs to stop squabbling and support a plan.

Tory MP David Davies today started a live TV debate about the Brexit after he visited Labor Member of Parliament Anna Turley (pictured together on the show today) & # 39; & # 39; by checking his mobile phone in the middle of the fiery debate

Tory MP David Davies today started a live TV debate about the Brexit after he visited Labor Member of Parliament Anna Turley (pictured together on the show today) & # 39; & # 39; by checking his mobile phone in the middle of the fiery debate

David Davies (pictured today with Anna Turley and Kay Burley) moaned that during the confrontation he could not get a good job - but was accused of patronizing by Kay Burley

David Davies (pictured today with Anna Turley and Kay Burley) moaned that during the confrontation he could not get a good job - but was accused of patronizing by Kay Burley

David Davies (pictured today with Anna Turley and Kay Burley) moaned that during the confrontation he could not get a good job – but was accused of patronizing by Kay Burley

David Davis then runs over the set after being asked to leave to patronize the Labor MP (photo)

David Davis then runs over the set after being asked to leave to patronize the Labor MP (photo)

David Davis then runs over the set after being asked to leave to patronize the Labor MP (photo)

The uncomfortable encounter came after the two members of parliament repeatedly clashed with Brexit during the fiery afternoon confrontation.

Ms Turley, Labor Member of Parliament for Redcar, has warned that the Brexit is threatening crucial factory jobs in her constituency.

May says that Commons will vote on her Brexit deal NOT to happen before Christmas

Theresa May today insisted on the Commons' vote on her Brexit deal not before Christmas – despite the cry of protests from Remainers and Eurosceptics.

The prime minister said she still hopes more & # 39; political and legal guarantees & # 39; from the EU against the Irish border border, and as a result, the confrontation in Parliament will not take place until the week starting on 14 January.

Calling on MEPs to follow her plan, Ms May said that European counterparts had made it clear that they did not want to use the insurance policy in the agreement.

She also delivered a stinging reprimand to those asking for a second referendum, saying that it is only up to & # 39; disaster & # 39; would lead.

The challenging statement to the Commons comes when Mrs May struggles to prevent the Cabinet from falling into chaos, with ministers openly opening alternatives to her Brexit plan.

Secretary of employment and pensions Amber Rudd today took the risk of directly contradicting the prime minister by insisting that "nothing should be taken off" if the government's plan is rejected by the Commons.

Secretary Greg Clark also supported the demand that MEPs would vote on a range of options & # 39;

However, Mrs. May has bluntly dismissed the idea of ​​a referendum again this afternoon.

Ms. May is supposed to resist calls to the Commons to vote on a series of Brexit options, amidst the fear that the process only gets deeper and deeper.

Mr Davies had insisted that the UK should better come from the European Union & # 39;

He added: "I find it bizarre that you say you will lose jobs while at the same time saying that there are not enough people to fill all available jobs when we leave the European Union and do not have a visa." ;

Their confrontation came on a new day of bitter clashes with the Brexit in Parliament, because a deal that can get support from a majority of MPs remains a distant future.

Ms. May was brought back today to the Commons to defend her deal in yet another statement to MPs after the EU summit last week – where her pleas for Brussels to dump the hated Irish way back were rejected.

She insisted that she still hopes to get a legally binding change in the backstop – widely regarded as an absolute must for her deal to endure every chance.

Ms. May also warned that it is a & # 39; disaster & # 39; would be to hold a second referendum – despite the fact that her senior assistants have secretly spoken about the recall of the votes behind them.

And she confirmed that the Commons vote on her Brexit deal will not happen before Christmas.

But Remainers and Brexiteers both put an end to the prime minister. She swung her deal and demanded drastic changes to her Brexit plan.

Arch Remainer Nicky Morgan demanded that MPs cancel their Christmas holidays and sit down during the festive period to find a way forward.

There are only 102 days to go until the Brexit, but with the deal from Ms. May seems overwhelmingly defeated when it comes to a vote in the new year, the British Brexit plans are in total chaos.

Brexiteers urge the UK to establish a managed no deal & # 39; strategy to ensure that the country leaves the Brussels bloc at the end of March next year.

While Remainers seize the chaos to raise their demands for another referendum – a Peoples Vote & # 39; called.

And deep division in the heart of the cabinet has come into the open.

In extraordinary scenes, ministers openly broke the rankings with No10 and floating alternatives for its Brexit plan.

Viewers of the bad-tempered confrontation were desperately left on the Brexit line - which comes when Britain is only 102 days away from leaving the EU and Parliament is still stuck with what to do

Viewers of the bad-tempered confrontation were desperately left on the Brexit line - which comes when Britain is only 102 days away from leaving the EU and Parliament is still stuck with what to do

Viewers of the bad-tempered confrontation were desperately left on the Brexit line – which comes when Britain is only 102 days away from leaving the EU and Parliament is still stuck with what to do

Another viewer noticed that anyone who attends to watching MPs debating the Brexit, encountered chaotic scenes

Another viewer noticed that anyone who attends to watching MPs debating the Brexit, encountered chaotic scenes

Another viewer noticed that anyone who attends to watching MPs debating the Brexit, encountered chaotic scenes

Theresa May (pictured today in the Commons) will warn that a second Brexit referendum will cause irreparable damage & # 39; to Britain, while she tries to weaken anger over the news that her own assistants have driven the idea

Theresa May (pictured today in the Commons) will warn that a second Brexit referendum will cause irreparable damage & # 39; to Britain, while she tries to weaken anger over the news that her own assistants have driven the idea

Theresa May (pictured today in the Commons) will warn that a second Brexit referendum will cause irreparable damage & # 39; to Britain, while she tries to weaken anger over the news that her own assistants have driven the idea

With Theresa May's deal to be voted for the Commons in the new year, Britain faces the prospect of a next referendum, a general election or another Brexit deal

With Theresa May's deal to be voted for the Commons in the new year, Britain faces the prospect of a next referendum, a general election or another Brexit deal

With Theresa May's deal to be voted for the Commons in the new year, Britain faces the prospect of a next referendum, a general election or another Brexit deal

Secretary of employment and pensions Amber Rudd today threatened to directly contradict the Prime Minister by insisting that nothing should come off the table & # 39; if the plan of the government was rejected by the Commons – effectively saying that a second referendum could be held.

Secretary Greg Clark also supported the demand that MEPs would vote on a range of options & # 39;

One cabinet group, including Philip Hammond, Clark and Ms. Rudd, urge the Commons to vote on a series of Brexit deal options.

Corbyn leaves the threat behind in May to give a stunt vote of distrust after less than an hour

Jeremy Corbyn abandoned an attempt to vote in Theresa May today with a stunt vote of no confidence in less than an hour.

Labor has repeatedly demanded that the Prime Minister call the postponement of vote on her Brexit deal before Christmas, despite the fact that he knew it would be defeated by a landslide.

Labor sources insisted around 15.00. Mr Corbyn would demand a vote of confidence in Mrs May if she failed to set a date in her statement to Members of Parliament today.

But after Ms. May said that the confrontation will take place in the week starting January 14, the Labor leader has never made his move in his own speech around 3.45 pm.

Despite the bizarre sequence of events, a Labor spokesman insisted that Ms. May only announced a date that threatened a vote of no confidence in her & # 39 ;.

Downing Street said last week that the vote would be held mid-January. Mrs. May only confirmed today what week it would happen.

This would include the possibility of holding a second referendum and a Norway-style relationship – which means that MPs could take control of the talks to push a soft Brexit through or stop altogether.

In the clearest public statement, Mr Clark said today to the BBC that if Mrs. May's deal falls, "Parliament should be invited to say what it agrees with".

Although he warned against a second referendum, he said that the uncertainty would continue for many months & # 39 ;.

But harder line Brexiteers believe that a & # 39; options & # 39; voice would only apply to delaying or canceling the Brexit.

The authority of Mrs. May was hammered last week after MPs had been given a cinfidence vote to try and expel her.

She survived, but more than a third of her MPs voted to drive her out – a much bigger rebellion than Number Ten had feared.

Meanwhile, Labor's position was thrown into chaos today when they announced that they would draft a motion of censure in the PM – only to leave the stunt less than an hour later.

Labor has repeatedly demanded that the Prime Minister call the postponement of vote on her Brexit deal before Christmas, despite the fact that he knew it would be defeated by a landslide.

Labor sources insisted around 15.00. Mr Corbyn would demand a vote of confidence in Mrs May if she failed to set a date in her statement to Members of Parliament today.

But after Ms. May said that the confrontation will take place in the week starting January 14, the Labor leader has never made his move in his own speech around 3.45 pm.

Despite the bizarre sequence of events, a Labor spokesman insisted that Ms. May only announced a date that threatened a vote of no confidence in her & # 39 ;.

Downing Street said last week that the vote would be held mid-January. Mrs. May only confirmed today what week it would happen.

In the Commons this afternoon, Ms. May also excluded everything from a second voice while she is in charge.

A simple vote could extend article 50, says government lawyer

Parliament could extend Article 50 to buy more time for the Brexit by simply voting, the government's legal adviser said.

It is assumed that Article 50, the mechanism for leaving the EU, should be extended after 29 March if Britain decides to hold a second referendum.

Robert Buckland said that extension does not require new legislation, only a one-time vote in the Commons.

Deletion Article 50, however, would require new legislation, Buckland told the Westminster Hour of Radio 4.

He said: & # 39; I think it would be better if legislation were needed. I think we should withdraw the EU withdrawal law.

Revocation is one thing, but postponing Article 50 is another issue that can be done by a minister who provides a legal instrument to vary the day of departure – it is part of a power. & # 39;

Mr Buckland also suggested that MPs could get a free vote on the Brexit way ahead.

I think that if all parties agree, it is something that would work well, but I think it would be out of balance if one party did it and the other did not, & # 39; he said.

Another referendum would probably not let us go any further than the previous one … and further divide our country at the time we should work to unite it, "she warned.

She added: "Let us not break the faith of the British people by trying to hold a new referendum, a new voice that would irreparably damage the integrity of our politics, for it would say to millions who trust in democracy that does not deliver our democracy. & # 39;

Her intervention came in the midst of increasing anger over the revelation that Chief of Staff Gavin Barwell and deputy David Lidington had supported the idea of ​​a second referendum.

MPs and Ministers reacted furiously to reports yesterday that Mr. Barwell had told his colleagues that a second poll was the only way forward & # 39; was in the light of the opposition to her Brexit deal.

On reports about social media yesterday, Mr. Barwell said he did not intend to hold a second referendum.

Mr. Lidington also raised eyebrows after it emerged. He held secret talks with Labor MPs last week in favor of another poll.

Despite the denials, the cabinet's sources complained that the rumors were the "ring of truth". had.

Remnants condemned the government because they were trying to walk around the clock & # 39 ;.

Former minister Sam Gyimah said: "Downing St has stopped selling the PM's defective deal.

& # 39; Instead, we designed displacement activity to derive from last week's failed renegotiation.

& # 39; And a joint effort to discredit any plausible alternative as they run around the clock. This is not in the national interest. & # 39;

"I think it is important, of course, if the Prime Minister has concluded its negotiations with other European leaders and the Commission, that Parliament will vote on this.

"If that does not work out, we have to reach agreement – we can not only have constant uncertainty and I think Parliament should be invited to say what it agrees with, and that is something I think companies are up and down. the country would expect elected members to take responsibility, rather than just being critics. & # 39;

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) left an attempt today to give a stunted voice of no confidence in Theresa May in less than an hour today

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) left an attempt today to give a stunted voice of no confidence in Theresa May in less than an hour today

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today in the Commons) left an attempt today to give a stunted voice of no confidence in Theresa May in less than an hour today

Which Brexit options could MEPs vote if the May deal fails?

More than half a dozen government ministers urge the House to vote on & # 39; options & # 39; to continue if the Theresa May deal fails.

Here are some of the possibilities that can be considered:

NORWAY PLUS

MPs from different parties have motivated the idea of ​​a model from Norway.

It would effectively keep the UK in the internal market, with a customs bolt to avoid a hard Irish border, and donors say it would keep Britain close to the EU while cutting the contributions to Brussels.

Critics say, however, that it has the disadvantages of maintaining free movement, and greatly restricting the possibilities to conclude trade agreements elsewhere.

It is also thought that the EU is concerned about a country whose UK size is joining the EEA, while other states in the group may be resistant.

SECOND REFERENDUM

The so called People & # 39; s Vote & # 39; campaign has fought hard for a new national vote, with the support of other parties.

MPs would almost certainly be asked to support the idea in principle.

The article 50 process should probably be extended to allow a referendum, but the EU seems open to that possibility.

The biggest problem, however, is probably that even if the Commons can agree on holding a vote, they will be completely divided over the question.

Some want it to be a repeat of 2016 with Remain v Leave. Others say it must be the deal of May against no deal.

There are also people who support two voting rounds, or multiple choice.

CANADA PLUS

Brexiteers have demanded that the UK choose a different approach this time, looking for a looser, Canadian-style agreement with the EU.

The arrangement they want would be a relatively clean break with the EU, with the possibility of concluding trade agreements elsewhere.

But it would be far behind in the low-friction access that Labor and large numbers of Tories insist on.

DO NOT MANAGE DEAL

Brexiteers float a & # 39; managed & # 39; no deal that could occur in the votes.

It would mean that the UK offers the EU billions of pounds to secure a transitional period, even if there is no broader agreement.

However, there is little sign that the EU is ready to come to an agreement.

.