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The skin patch, developed by Imperial College London, contains micro needles such as teeth (photo) that accurately detect how much medicine is in a person's body

A skin patch with small needles can help treat patients who are seriously ill by measuring their level of antibiotics.

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Researchers at Imperial College London discovered that the patches can accurately detect how much medicine is in a patient's body.

This allows doctors to evaluate in real time how well a patient with an infection is responding to treatment – instead of waiting to see if it works.

The patch, 1.5 cm in the square, can also reduce the cost of the NHS, since doctors can optimize the dosage and reduce excessive use.

The skin patch, developed by Imperial College London, contains micro needles such as teeth (photo) that accurately detect how much medicine is in a person's body

The skin patch, developed by Imperial College London, contains micro needles such as teeth (photo) that accurately detect how much medicine is in a person's body

Dr. Timothy Rawson, of the infectious diseases department of Imperial, said: & # 39; Microneedle biosensors have great potential for monitoring and treating the sickest of patients.

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& # 39; When patients are treated in hospital for serious bacterial infections, the only way to see if antibiotics we give them is to wait and see how they respond, and to take regular blood samples to check their levels of the drugs in their system – but this can take time.

& # 39; Our biosensors can change that.

& # 39; By using a simple patch on the skin of the arm, or possibly at the site of infection, it can tell us how much of a drug is used by the body and provide us with essential medical information in real time. & # 39 ;

Microneedle biosensors are like a row of & # 39; teeth & # 39; that penetrate the skin and detect changes in the fluid between cells.

The teeth can be coated with enzymes that react with a drug of your choice, which changes the local pH of the surrounding tissue if the drug is present.

HOW DOES THE TUG DRUG RESISTANCE REDUCE?

The scientists behind the test at Imperial College in London believe that the test can improve the use of antibiotics and thereby reduce drug resistance.

Drug resistance occurs when microbes adapt over time and can withstand drugs that are intended to kill them by developing defense strategies.

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The most common form of drug resistance is antibiotic resistance, fulfilled by abuse and excessive prescription of medicines by general practitioners.

This is because unnecessary exposure of bacteria to drugs offers more possibilities for drug resistance to develop and spread.

Of the 150 million prescriptions for antibiotics that are written by US doctors every year, a third is not needed, according to The Wellcomme Trust.

A growing number of common bacterial infections – such as urinary tract infections, gonorrhea, tuberculosis or pneumonia – have become more dangerous because the standard antibiotics that worked for so long are no longer as effective.

Sometimes the bacteria behind them become & # 39; superbugs & # 39; mentioned.

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The rate at which the resistance spreads can be reduced with better use of existing antibiotics.

Professor Alison Holmes, of Imperial's Department of Infectious Disease, said: & # 39; Antibiotic resistance and drug-resistant infections are among the greatest threats to human health in the world today. & # 39;

Until now, the technology has been used to monitor blood sugar levels. The new results are published in The Lancet Digital Health magazine.

Dr. Rawson and colleagues tested the sensors in 10 healthy patients who received doses of penicillin.

The patches were placed on their forearms and connected to monitors, whereby measurements were regularly taken and compared with blood samples taken at the same time.

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Data from nine patients indicated that the sensors could accurately detect the changing concentration of penicillin in patients' bodies.

The overall measurements of the patches were similar to those of the blood samples and, over time, showed a clear decrease in penicillin concentration in the patient's body.

Professor Tony Cass, of the chemistry department, said: & # 39; This small, early phase study has shown that sensor technology is as effective as standard clinical clinical analysis.

& # 39; With further development, this technology can be crucial for the monitoring and treatment of patients with serious infections. & # 39;

If testing with a larger group of patients is successful, the team hopes that the patch would be more cost-effective for the NHS.

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Treatment for patients with life-threatening infections can be improved while treating less serious infections, thereby reducing drug use.

Optimal dosing can also reduce the number of infections that are resistant to drugs, usually antibiotics.

Antibiotic resistance, fueled by excessive use and prescription medication, can lead to life-threatening problems.

It has become a global threat, causing an estimated 23,000 deaths in the US each year, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Professor Alison Holmes, of the infectious diseases department of Imperial, said: & This technology can change the way we treat patients.

& # 39; Antibiotic resistance and drug-resistant infections are among the greatest threats to human health in the world today.

& # 39; Ultimately, this type of collaborative, multidisciplinary solution could lead to earlier detection and better treatment of infections, saving more lives and protecting these invaluable drugs for generations to come. & # 39;

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