Six pints of beer a week linked to reduced heart attack risk, study says zegt

Drinking nearly half a liter for every day of the week may help prevent the deadly effects of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a new study reveals.

Experts from University College London say drinking up to 105 grams of alcohol per week is linked to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, angina or death in people with CVD.

This is equivalent to 13 British units of alcohol, which is less than six pints of medium strength beer or a little more than a bottle of wine.

However, the study authors were quick to emphasize that they are not advising people with CVD disease to start drinking if they are not already doing so.

Drinking up to 105 grams of alcohol per week – equivalent to 13 UK units of alcohol, less than six pints of medium strength beer or slightly more than a bottle of wine – may be associated with a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, angina or deaths among people with cardiovascular disease (CVD), experts from University College London say:

HEART AND vascular disease

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a general term for diseases of the heart or blood vessels.

It is usually associated with a buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries (atherosclerosis) and an increased risk of blood clots.

It can also be associated with damage to arteries in organs such as the brain, heart, kidneys and eyes.

CVD is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the UK, but it can often be largely prevented by living a healthy lifestyle.

All heart disease is heart disease, but not all heart disease is heart disease.

“Our findings suggest that people with CVD may not need to stop drinking to prevent additional heart attacks, strokes or angina, but may want to consider reducing their weekly alcohol intake,” said study author Chengyi Ding.

“Since alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of developing other diseases, people with cardiovascular disease who do not drink should not be encouraged to drink.”

The authors estimated the risk of heart attack, stroke, angina and death for 48,423 adults with CVD, using data obtained from the UK Biobank, the Health Survey for England, the Scottish Health Survey and 12 previous studies.

Participants reported their average alcohol consumption. Data on subsequent heart attacks, strokes, angina or death, over a period of up to 20 years, were obtained from health, hospitalization and death records.

Among people with CVD, those who drank up to 15 grams of alcohol a day – equivalent to less than two British units – had a lower risk of recurrent heart attack, stroke, angina or death, compared with those who drank no alcohol.

One unit is equal to half a pint of medium strength beer or half a standard glass of wine.

And those who drank more than 62 grams of alcohol a day – equivalent to less than eight British units – had no increased risk of recurrent heart attacks, strokes, angina or death compared to those who drank no alcohol.

Cardiovascular disease is the term for all types of diseases that affect the heart or blood vessels, including coronary heart disease (clogged arteries), which can cause heart attacks, strokes, congenital heart defects, and peripheral artery disease.

Cardiovascular disease is the term for all types of diseases that affect the heart or blood vessels, including coronary heart disease (clogged arteries), which can cause heart attacks, strokes, congenital heart defects, and peripheral artery disease.

UK DRINKING GUIDELINES

The NHS advises men and women to drink no more than 14 units a week to avoid health risks.

For example, a bottle of lager contains about 1.7 units and a large glass of wine about three units.

A pint of strong lager contains 3 units of alcohol, while the same volume of low strength lager contains just over 2 units.

Drinking heavily once or twice a week increases your risk of long-term illness and injury, according to the Chief Medical Officers’ guideline.

The risk of developing a range of health problems (including cancers of the mouth, throat and breast) increases the more you drink regularly.

Participants at the lowest risk of heart attack, stroke, angina or death drank between six and eight ounces of alcohol a day – equivalent to less than one British unit.

Those who drank six ounces of alcohol a day were 50 percent less likely to have a recurrent heart attack, angina, or stroke than those who didn’t drink.

And those who drank eight ounces a day had a 27 percent lower risk of death from heart attack, stroke or angina.

While those who drank seven ounces a day had a 21 percent lower risk of death from any cause, compared with those who didn’t drink.

The authors caution that their findings, published in BMC Medicine. may overestimate the reduced risk of recurrent heart attack, stroke, angina and death for moderate drinkers with CVD.

This is due to the underrepresentation of heavy drinkers and the categorization of former drinkers who may have stopped drinking due to ill health as non-drinkers in some of the included datasets.

The study follows a report in May from experts at Massachusetts General Hospital who concluded that consuming a moderate amount of alcohol daily may reduce the risk of death for people with CVD.

The authors linked moderate alcohol intake — defined as no more than one alcoholic drink for women and two for men per day — with a 20 percent lower risk of dying from CVD, in a sample of more than 50,000 people.

Interestingly enough, this percentage decrease compared to people in the sample with low alcohol intake – defined as less than one drink per week.

“The thinking is that moderate amounts of alcohol may have effects on the brain that can help you relax, reduce stress and, perhaps through these mechanisms, lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease,” study author Dr. Kenechukwu Mezue said at the time.

Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, with an estimated 17.9 million lives per year.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a general term for diseases of the heart or blood vessels.

It is usually associated with a buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries (atherosclerosis) and an increased risk of blood clots.

It can also be associated with damage to arteries in organs such as the brain, heart, kidneys and eyes.

CVD is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the UK, but it can often be largely prevented by living a healthy lifestyle.

All heart disease is heart disease, but not all heart disease is heart disease.

CVD events include heart disease and stroke.

Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, taking approximately 17.9 million lives each year.

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