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As a Sandhurst cavalry officer in his early twenties, Churchill was accused of acting as Oscar Wilde & # 39; and cavort with colleagues & # 39; s

Sir Winston Churchill is perhaps the historian of GAY and TV comedy Charlie Higson

  • As a cavalry worker at Sandhurst, he was accused of acting like Oscar Wilde & # 39;
  • His mother intervened and helped him avoid charges, writer Charlie Higson said
  • & # 39; He married Clemmie, but he may have been gay & # 39 ;, he added
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Britain's acclaimed war leader, Winston Churchill, may have been gay, according to stunning claims from author and TV comedy Charlie Higson.

As a Sandhurst cavalry officer in his early twenties, Churchill was accused of acting like Oscar Wilde & # 39; and cavort with fellow officers.

But, according to Higson, Churchill's mother intervened and helped him avoid charges at a time when homosexuality was illegal.

& # 39; He married Clemmie, but there is a possibility that he would have been gay & # 39 ;, Higson told an audience at the Chalke Valley History Festival.

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As a Sandhurst cavalry officer in his early twenties, Churchill was accused of acting as Oscar Wilde & # 39; and cavort with colleagues & # 39; s

As a Sandhurst cavalry officer in his early twenties, Churchill was accused of acting as Oscar Wilde & # 39; and cavort with colleagues & # 39; s

& # 39; In his early twenties, he was accused of acting like Oscar Wilde with some cavalry officers, but his mother managed to help him suppress the case. & # 39;

According to Higson – one of the main writers and stars of BBC sketch The Fast Show – Churchill carved a glamorous and heady figure as a young man and entertained musical hall entertainment and drinking cocktails.

& # 39; He would get drunk and show like young men, & # 39; he told the festival, which is sponsored by The Daily Mail, the sister document of The Mail on Sunday.

Churchill was admitted to Sandhurst in 1893. Higson said: "He loved many aspects of life in the army, he loved horse riding, he liked to play polo and worked very hard at Sandhurst and was one of the ten best graduates there in his year." ;

& # 39; He married Clemmie, but there is a possibility that he may have been gay & # 39 ;, Higson told an audience at the Chalke Valley History Festival

& # 39; He married Clemmie, but there is a possibility that he may have been gay & # 39 ;, Higson told an audience at the Chalke Valley History Festival

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& # 39; He married Clemmie, but there is a possibility that he may have been gay & # 39 ;, Higson told an audience at the Chalke Valley History Festival

Churchill had hoped that his police father Lord Randolph would be proud of his performance in Sandhurst, but his father died shortly after he left the military academy.

"I think Winston spent the rest of his life trying to impress his deceased father and prove that he could make something of himself and that he was worthy to bear the Churchill name," said Higson.

The star spoke of the rise of Lord Randolph as a British statesman – he held positions including treasury chancellor and leader of the House of Commons – before his career was tragically short when he died at the age of 45.

Tickets are available for the final day of The Chalke Valley History Festival, near Salisbury, Wiltshire. Go to cvhf.org.uk for details.

Appeasement is not a dirty word, says World War II historian

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According to historian Tim Bouverie, appeasement should not be a & # 39; dirty word & # 39; to be.

Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasing Nazi Germany collapsed in the decades after World War II because it was accused of stopping Hitler.

But Mr Bouverie – who has just written a critically acclaimed book on this subject – explained that the situation at that time seemed very different when the nation was still being chased by the mass victims of the First World War.

He told the public at the Chalke Valley History Festival yesterday: “The decision to wage war is always the most informed political decision.

& # 39; It is also important to say that a number of people have underestimated Adolf Hitler.

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& # 39; The British were deeply shocked by the speed at which Hitler established his dictatorship and began his rule of racial persecution. & # 39; Hitler: Chamberlain, Churchill And The Road To War is the first book written by Mr Bouverie, a former political journalist with Channel 4 News who has studied history in Oxford.

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