Sir Paul McCartney & # 039; misremembers & # 039; writing The Beatles & # 039; Follow & # 039; In my life & # 039;

The two frontmen of the Beatles wrote some of the hits of the band, but the debate about who really created & # 39; In My Life & # 39; It is debated. Sir Paul McCartney (right) says he put lyrics by John Lennon (left) to the music, while Lennon insisted that his colleague had a minimal entry

Sir Paul McCartney has long claimed that he played a key role in the writing of the Beatles hit song "In My Life", even though the track is attributed to his bandmate John Lennon .

Since the murder of Lennon in 1980, the mystery surrounding the song, which was included in the Rubber Soul album of 1965, was not resolved.

However, the scientists who used the statistical analysis to identify the musical signatures of each of the composers now claim to have a definitive answer.

According to the research, it highlights 149 different metrics to determine the musical fingerprints of each composer, it is overwhelmingly likely that & # 39; In My Life & # 39; has been written by Lennon and that McCartney simply has "misremembers". writing the song.

Sir Paul McCartney has always maintained that he put John Lennon's lyrics to music, while Lennon insisted that his fellow member of the band had a minimal input in the creation.

However, the latest findings reveal that, stylistically, there is less of a possibility in 50 that McCartney has written the music in "In My Life", which is appears as number 23 in the list of the best songs of Rolling Stone.

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The two frontmen of the Beatles wrote some of the hits of the band, but the debate about who really created & # 39; In My Life & # 39; It is debated. Sir Paul McCartney (right) says he put lyrics by John Lennon (left) to the music, while Lennon insisted that his colleague had a minimal entry

The two frontmen of the Beatles wrote some of the hits of the band, but the debate about who really created & # 39; In My Life & # 39; It is debated. Sir Paul McCartney (right) says he put lyrics by John Lennon (left) to the music, while Lennon insisted that his colleague had a minimal entry

Mark Glickman, a professor of statistics at Harvard University, and Jason Brown, a professor of mathematics at Dalhousie University, used computer analysis to analyze the musical styles of The Beatles.

The researchers found a clear difference in the way the two musical icons use the tone.

McCartney's tracks tended to be complex and varied, while the tone in Lennon rarely changed, the study revealed.

"Consider Lennon's song," Help! ", Explained Dr. Glickman.

"Basically it says:" When I was younger, much younger than today ", where the tone does not change much.

& # 39; It stays on the same note repeatedly, and it only changes in short steps.

"While with Paul McCartney, you take a song like & # 39; Michelle & # 39; In terms of tone, it's everywhere & # 39 ;.

They "decomposed" Beatles songs between 1962 and 1966 and analyzed 149 different metrics to determine the musical fingerprints of each composer.

This allowed the researchers to develop an auditory signature for the artist based on the frequency of chords, chord transitions, melodic notes, as well as tone.

"The basic idea is to convert a song into a set of different data structures that are susceptible to establishing a signature of a song using a quantitative approach.

"Think of decomposing a color into its constituent components of red, green and blue with different weights attached.

"The probability that" In My Life "has been written by McCartney is .018, which basically means that it's quite a convincing Lennon song, McCartney reminds me badly.

Sir Paul McCartney (pictured) has long claimed that he wrote the classical song, telling music writer and broadcaster Paul Gambaccini in the 1970s: "Those were the words that John wrote, and I wrote him the melody. That was great & # 39;

Sir Paul McCartney (pictured) has long claimed that he wrote the classical song, telling music writer and broadcaster Paul Gambaccini in the 1970s: "Those were the words that John wrote, and I wrote him the melody. That was great & # 39;

& # 39; The Word & # 39 ;, from the same album that & # 39; In My Life & # 39 ;, Lennon has always been attributed (in the photo), but researchers have discovered it almost certainly thanks to a Sir Paul's classic.

& # 39; The Word & # 39 ;, from the same album that & # 39; In My Life & # 39 ;, Lennon has always been attributed (in the photo), but researchers have discovered it almost certainly thanks to a Sir Paul's classic.

US researchers UU They used computer analysis to analyze the musical styles of the Beatles. They found that the probability of & # 39; In My Life & # 39; has been written by McCartney (left) is .018. Which basically means that it's quite convincingly a Lennon song (right, pictured in 1971)

Researchers & # 39; decomposed & # 39; the songs of the Beatles (in the image) from 1962 to 1966 and analyzed 149 different metrics to determine the musical fingerprints of each composer. This allowed the researchers to develop an auditory signature for the artist

Researchers & # 39; decomposed & # 39; the songs of the Beatles (in the image) from 1962 to 1966 and analyzed 149 different metrics to determine the musical fingerprints of each composer. This allowed the researchers to develop an auditory signature for the artist

Researchers & # 39; decomposed & # 39; the songs of the Beatles (in the image) from 1962 to 1966 and analyzed 149 different metrics to determine the musical fingerprints of each composer. This allowed the researchers to develop an auditory signature for the artist

Sir Paul McCartney has always claimed that he created the classical song, telling music writer and broadcaster Paul Gambaccini in the 1970s: "Those were the words that John wrote, and I wrote him the melody.

According to McCartney, he put lyrics to music after finding inspiration in Smokey Robinson and The Miracles.

John Lennon always disputed this fact and said that only the middle-eight & # 39; and the harmonies came from his bandmate.

The investigation also threw a curved ball into the mix, after revealing that a track that was long written by Mr. Lennon was actually created by McCartney.

& # 39; The Word & # 39 ;, also from Rubber Soul, has always been attributed to Lennon, but researchers claim that it is almost certainly by Sir Paul.

Sir Paul McCartney will not respond to the study, said a spokesman for the singer.

HOW DOES THE HUMAN BRAIN DETECT THE PITCH?

Changes in vocal tone, part of what linguists call "speech prosody," are almost as fundamental to human communication as melody is to music.

In tone languages, such as Mandarin Chinese, pitch changes can completely alter the meaning of a word

But even in a non-tonal language such as English, differences in tone can significantly change the meaning of a spoken sentence.

The ability of the brain to interpret these changes in tone on the fly is remarkable, given that each speaker has its own style and vocal tone: some have low voices and others high.

The brain must track and interpret these pitch changes while analyzing at the same time what consonants and vowels are pronounced, what words they form and how they are combined in phrases and sentences, in a millisecond.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, discovered that brain cells are responsible for studying ten patients suffering from epilepsy in 2017.

These cells are found in a small area known as the superior temporal gyrus (STG).

As the tone of the prayer increases, the neuronal activity increases.

What this research showed is that there are specific regions and selected cells that can detect differences in tone.

Some neurons distinguish between the sounds of speakers based on differences in their average vocal tone range.

In addition to tone, the human brain also has different regions that help determine between sounds.

Some neurons pick up fundamental differences in the sound of words, for example, "reindeer" sounds different from "lawyer" no matter who is speaking.

Another group of neurons distinguishes between different patterns of intonation.

This animation highlights cells sensitive to tuning in a small area of ​​the brain known as the superior temporal gyrus (STG). As the tone of the sentence increases (red), the neuronal activity in certain areas increases (credit: Carla Schaffer / AAAS)

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