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Sir David Attenborough braves extreme temperatures of -18C for The Green Planet

Sir David Attenborough returned to our screens for The Green Planet this month.

And in the coming scenes, the broadcaster can be seen braving extreme temperatures of -18°C as he kicks off the episode in Finland.

The 95-year-old made his way to Tykky Forest, just inside the Arctic Circle, where ice and snow cover the red pine trees to form sentinel formations, as he explores the four seasons through plant life.

Brrrr!  Sir David Attenborough, 95, braves extreme temperatures of -18C as he explores a forest in the Arctic Circle for the next episode of The Green Planet

Brrrr! Sir David Attenborough, 95, braves extreme temperatures of -18C as he explores a forest in the Arctic Circle for the next episode of The Green Planet

Filming took place in 2020, just weeks before the lockdown was imposed, as David and the crew battled the freezing cold to complete the programme.

Series producer Rosie Thomas says: ‘The temperatures in Finland in February are certainly not warm, even with the sun. It was -18°C.

“Batteries ran out extremely quickly, our drones struggled and no one could stay warm for long. Fortunately, the crew was able to stay relatively warm in a tiny cabin on top of the mountain.’

To freeze!  David made his way to the Tykky Forest where ice and snow cover the red pine trees to form sentinel formations as he explores the four seasons through plant life

To freeze!  David made his way to the Tykky Forest where ice and snow cover the red pine trees to form sentinel formations as he explores the four seasons through plant life

To freeze! David made his way to the Tykky Forest where ice and snow cover the red pine trees to form sentinel formations as he explores the four seasons through plant life

Speak with the mirror She added: ‘He had hot water bottles, heated blankets and he was wearing about six coats.

“I was there for 10 days and it snowed every day except the day David was there and the sun came out.”

This is because David proved again that age was just a number when he impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming.

The environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that aired last week.

Young at heart: This comes after David proved once again that age was just a number when he impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming

Young at heart: This comes after David proved once again that age was just a number when he impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming

Young at heart: This comes after David proved once again that age was just a number when he impressed the crew of The Green Planet with his rowing skills during filming

David had the world heritage site of Falling lakes in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, the show bosses refused to let him row back.

Producer Mike Gunton described the moment when David rowed everyone back to shore in a “heavy old boat.”

Filmed using groundbreaking technology, the five-part series is split into five distinct plant worlds: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds, and human worlds.

Covid travel restrictions meant the series, made by the world-renowned Natural History Unit at BBC Studios, was filmed over four years.

Boat: The environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that aired last week

Boat: The environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that aired last week

Boat: The environmentalist showed his stamina when he insisted on rowing himself back across a Croatian lake after shooting scenes for the show that aired last week

David believes that The Green Planet series is timely, especially with biodiversity declining faster than at any other time in human history.

A 2018 study found that human activity has been responsible for the loss of 83 percent of the world’s wild mammals and 50 percent of our plants.

He said, “The world has become plant-conscious. There has been a global revolution in attitudes towards the natural world,” he said earlier.

Strong: David had visited the Falling Lakes World Heritage Site in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, he refused to let show bosses push him back

Strong: David had visited the Falling Lakes World Heritage Site in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, he refused to let show bosses push him back

Strong: David had visited the Falling Lakes World Heritage Site in Plitvice and after exploring the area and vegetation, he refused to let show bosses push him back

‘Without plants we would starve, without plants we wouldn’t be able to breathe. The world is green, but people’s understanding of plants, albeit in a limited way, has not kept up with that.

“This will bring it home. It’s a cliché now, but every bite of air we take, and every bite of food we eat, depends on plants.’

He says one of his favorite moments was filming giant redwoods in California for the Seasonal Worlds episode.

The Green Planet, Seasonal Worlds, airs on BBC One on January 23 at 7pm.

Amazing: The five-part series is split into five different worlds that plants inhabit: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds and human worlds

Amazing: The five-part series is split into five different worlds that plants inhabit: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds and human worlds

Amazing: The five-part series is split into five different worlds that plants inhabit: tropical worlds, water worlds, seasonal worlds, desert worlds and human worlds

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