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Single mother-of-three finally secures NSW home suitable for family including her disabled son

A single mother who was nearly homeless with her three children, including a disabled son, has finally secured a home for her family.

Bec Darby, 33, has struggled to find a rental home suitable for her wheelchair-bound son Hunter, 14, ever since her landlord told her they wanted the home she had rented seven years ago.

They were given only two months to find a new place.

The family nearly moved into their car, with Mrs. Darby being told by a government agency to consider putting Hunter in a care facility to increase her chances of finding a home.

But after her pleas for help were seen by a local real estate company in the Illawarra region of NSW, Mrs Darby and her three children now have a roof to sleep under.

Single mother of three Bec Darby (pictured), 33, was finally able to find a suitable home for her family in Shell Cove, south of the Illawarra.  She said 'It fits perfectly', for her disabled son Hunter, who was born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Single mother of three Bec Darby (pictured), 33, was finally able to find a suitable home for her family in Shell Cove, south of the Illawarra. She said ‘It fits perfectly’, for her disabled son Hunter, who was born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

“I think of all those people who live in tents and cars and can’t find anything and I’m so grateful to the community for helping us,” said Mrs. Darby. A current matter.

Hunter was born with a muscle-consuming disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a terminal illness with no cure.

Ms Darby, who works full-time in aged care, had previously looked at over 100 properties but could not find anything suitable for her son.

“It’s very stressful right now and it just doesn’t make sense,” she previously told the program.

“I’ve been told there’s a chance Hunter might have to go into a house to get us housing, and that’s very, very scary.

Hunter (pictured), 14, was born with a muscle-wasting disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a terminal illness with no cure

Hunter (pictured), 14, was born with a muscle-wasting disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a terminal illness with no cure

‘That’s not my concern. We stay together, my family.’

Her story caught the attention of Illawarra Estate Agents who helped the Darby family move into a new home in Shell Cove this month.

“I’m so relieved and so grateful,” Mrs. Darby said after moving in.

“This fits perfectly, it’s all flat, he can get out the back… it’s so close to everything and his friends and stuff and school.”

All the rooms in the house are on the same level, making it perfect for Hunter to get around.

The 14 year old now has his own bedroom and bathroom which are both wheelchair friendly.

“I like it better here than the last place,” he said.

“You can go down the street to the marina for lunch.”

Hunter Darby (right) has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and the family needs a home that can accommodate his wheelchair

Hunter Darby (right) has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and the family needs a home that can accommodate his wheelchair

Ms Darby said before securing her new home she was ‘mentally struggling’

“I’m really worried about the kids breaking up,” she said.

‘I called the public housing department, assuming that I would certainly be entitled to a priority list.

“You know, a single mother with kids, one with extra needs. But unfortunately I make too much money.

“So I don’t qualify for anything, that’s sickening.”

It was suggested to her that one way around the system was to get social housing by quitting her job.

“For me to quit my job and then have no money and live off the government to live in government housing… You want to work, you don’t want to be dependent on the state,” Ms Darby said earlier.

“It’s not what I want to show my kids, you know, I want to show them you can work and you can, you know, all those things.”

What is Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy?

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness due to the changes in a protein called dystrophin that helps keep muscle cells intact.

The symptoms of DMD begin in early childhood, usually between the ages of two and three.

The disease mainly affects boys, but in rare cases it can also affect girls.

Source: Muscular Dystrophy Association

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