Simon and Jakob are middle class students who will vote for a party with neo-Nazi roots

Jakob Bartel, 19, said his parents worked in the health service and had seen how patients who lived in the country for 20 years still had to use hospital translators because their Swedish was very poor.

The far-right leader who threatens to shake Sweden's socialist nirvana and send shockwaves to Europe in today's elections has vowed to "do something new" for his nation after a campaign dominated by immigration issues.

Jimmie Akesson, whose Sweden Democrats (SD) are prepared for an amazing breakthrough that could make it emerge as the country's biggest party, used a rally in Malmö to express his divisive message about migration.

After changing the name of a party with neo-Nazi roots, Akesson leads the polls in a country that has seen left-wing Social Democrats finish first in every election since 1917.

Jakob Bartel, 19, said his parents worked in the health service and had seen how patients who lived in the country for 20 years still had to use hospital translators because their Swedish was very poor.

Jakob Bartel, 19, said his parents worked in the health service and had seen how patients who lived in the country for 20 years still had to use hospital translators because their Swedish was very poor.

Yesterday, Stefan Löfven, the Social Democrat prime minister, warned that backing the SD was "dangerous" and said it was "like trying to put out the fire with alcohol".

The rally followed a furor over Akesson's comments in the final election debate that immigrants could not get a job because "they are not Swedish" and "they do not fit."

"We are the only ones who understand that you do not change your values ​​just because you change the ground under your feet," he told his supporters in Malmö. "Point out that the immigrants who have just arrived are not Swedes, they can not be against democratic values."

Tommy Brorsson, 72 (pictured), president of Örkelljunga SD and restorer of vintage sports cars, claimed that the influx of immigrants had brought down school rules and had left residents afraid to walk outside during the weekend. night. "We need the old Sweden," he said.

Tommy Brorsson, 72 (pictured), president of Örkelljunga SD and restorer of vintage sports cars, claimed that the influx of immigrants had brought down school rules and had left residents afraid to walk outside during the weekend. night. "We need the old Sweden," he said.

Tommy Brorsson, 72 (pictured), president of Örkelljunga SD and restorer of vintage sports cars, claimed that the influx of immigrants had brought down school rules and had left residents afraid to walk outside during the weekend. night. "We need the old Sweden," he said.

His speech, quartered by leftist protesters, focused relentlessly on crime, immigration and security. "It is so important and fantastic to break the hegemony of the Social Democratic Party that is 100 years old," he said.

The rival parties have ruled out forming a government with Akesson, leaving fears of political stalemate as voters shift to extremes of right and left in a nation famous for its high taxes, a strong welfare state and social liberalism.

Sweden seems destined to become the last country affected by the populist insurgency sweeping Europe and challenging the political demands of Austria to Germany, Italy and other parts of Scandinavia. It has welcomed more immigrants and refugees per head than any other country in Europe since 2015. Despite low unemployment, it has the fastest-growing inequality of any industrialized nation and there is widespread pessimism about the future.

After changing the name of a party with neo-Nazi roots, Akesson is in the lead in some polls in a country that has seen left-wing Social Democrats finish first in every election since 1917.

After changing the name of a party with neo-Nazi roots, Akesson is in the lead in some polls in a country that has seen left-wing Social Democrats finish first in every election since 1917.

After changing the name of a party with neo-Nazi roots, Akesson is in the lead in some polls in a country that has seen left-wing Social Democrats finish first in every election since 1917.

Among those who listened to Akesson were two students from the University of Malmö who were preparing to cast their first ballot. "I would support him for the migration," said Simon, 18. "My friends and I have been robbed several times, my mother was robbed by foreigners.

Jakob Bartel, 19, said his parents worked in the health service and had seen how patients who lived in the country for 20 years still had to use hospital translators because their Swedish was very poor. "This costs money," he said. "I do not blame the immigrants but the politicians."

However, Thea, a 19-year-old from Lund, said: "Sweden should be a country for everyone." That is scary [the SD] it could be the biggest party. "

Yesterday, Stefan Löfven, Social Democrat prime minister, warned that supporting the SD was "dangerous". and he said it was like trying to put out the fire with alcohol & # 39;

Yesterday, Stefan Löfven, Social Democrat prime minister, warned that supporting the SD was "dangerous". and he said it was like trying to put out the fire with alcohol & # 39;

Yesterday, Stefan Löfven, Social Democrat prime minister, warned that supporting the SD was "dangerous". and he said it was like trying to put out the fire with alcohol & # 39;

Such are the divisions in this nation recognized for its serenity, stability and socialism, but which has been torn by the arguments about integration into a society that offers free housing, medical care and great benefits for all.

In Örkelljunga, a market city in difficulties 60 miles from Malmö, almost one in four people supported the SD in the last elections in 2014, one of its largest voting shares. Now he hopes to win the backing of at least a third of the local citizens, even though a candidate had to withdraw last week after a newspaper published posts on Facebook saying "Hitler was not that bad" & # 39; and he did not lie about Jews & # 39;

Tommy Brorsson, 72, president of Örkelljunga SD and restorer of classic sports cars, said the influx of immigrants had brought down school standards and left residents afraid to walk outside at night. "We lack the old Sweden," he said.

The rally followed a furor over Akesson's comments in the final election debate that immigrants could not get a job because "they are not Swedish" and "they do not fit."

The rally followed a furor over Akesson's comments in the final election debate that immigrants could not get a job because "they are not Swedish" and "they do not fit."

The rally followed a furor over Akesson's comments in the final election debate that immigrants could not get a job because "they are not Swedish" and "they do not fit."

He also claimed that there had been a series of sexual assaults, pointing to the case of a Syrian migrant accused of raping a 13-year-old girl in July. "This is not what we expect in the field," he said. "It's not a pleasant situation."

The SD has made a strong game of such cases. A television documentary last month claimed that 58 percent of rapists in Sweden were born abroad, although experts say that the crime rates of migrants in general are not that different from low-income ones.

Even a staunch green voter told me that she supported the SD position on migration, however, others fear its impact. "They want to divide the country into good Swedes and bad Swedes," said nurse assistant Sella Karabit, 38. "I do not want a divided country."

Rival parties have ruled out forming a government with Akesson, leaving fears of political stalemate as voters shift to extremes of right and left in a nation famous for its high taxes, a strong welfare state and social liberalism.

Rival parties have ruled out forming a government with Akesson, leaving fears of political stalemate as voters shift to extremes of right and left in a nation famous for its high taxes, a strong welfare state and social liberalism.

Rival parties have ruled out forming a government with Akesson, leaving fears of political stalemate as voters shift to extremes of right and left in a nation famous for its high taxes, a strong welfare state and social liberalism.

Standing next to the SD post in Gothenburg, where the ruling Social Democrats have dropped to fourth place in the polls, I found a Jewish hospital doctor covered with a sign that highlights the anti-Semitic comments of the party figures. Patrik Hallmem, 36, said he was concerned about polarization in Sweden. "We've seen these things before in the 1930s," he added. & # 39; What will be the next step? & # 39;

Analysts like Tino Sanandaji believe that these events are the result of the main parties making a discussion about the immigration taboo. "The SDs were a small radioactive party, but when this happened, they kept growing," he said. However, is migration part of a broader picture in which a liberal nation has been absorbed by fears in a world shaken by globalization and rapid technological change?

"We've been optimistic for years, but people are increasingly scared," said Erik Zsiga, a columnist who served as press secretary for Carl Bildt, the former conservative prime minister.

He says that the nerves began to tinkle in 2014 after the invasion of Crimea, with Sweden – which is not a member of NATO – reintroducing compulsory military service this year due to the Russian threat in the Baltic.

Zsiga's opinion was partially supported by Magdalena Andersson, the finance minister considered the next leader of the Social Democrats, who warned that support for the far right was increasing in the strongholds of the working class due to job insecurity.

"Research shows that the reason why you think migration is an important issue is that you do not have a job or at least you feel that your presence in the labor market is insecure," he told The Mail on Sunday while campaigning in Stockholm on Friday.

His party won half of the votes in 1968. However, a YouGov poll four days ago put the Social Democrats one point behind the SD, which was at 24.8 percent, the moderates-along with our conservatives-in 16.5 percent and the left party, former communists, almost 10 percent. In 2010, the SD won only 5.7 percent of the vote. The far right has already forced changes in migration, with numbers going down from 163,000 in 2015 to 23,000 this year, and has demanded a two-year margin for newcomers.

He has frequently challenged the liberal consensus with slogans that promise "real change". and has made exaggerated claims of & # 39; prohibited zones & # 39; – 23 zones – especially vulnerable & # 39; identified by the police – in cities such as Gothenburg and Malmö.

Among them is Rosengård, the neighborhood of Malmö where the footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic grew up, who has been shaken by bombings and car incinerations in gang wars. He saw another fatal shooting in July, between 11 this year in a city the size of Bradford.

Next to a soccer field with the Zlatan footprints preserved in concrete, I met a couple from Lebanon with two children. "The last two years have been a problem for people who have been shot and burned cars," the 27-year-old woman said. "We care about the safety of our children here."

She is training to be a teacher and her husband studies nursing. "Maybe it was not a good policy to put many new refugees in one place, but we are building this society, not destroying it."

Then, I asked, who would she vote for? She smiled and then replied: "Probably the Social Democrats." At least some Swedes still believe in their old post-war dream.

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