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Sikh volunteer group makes 189 consecutive days of curries to deliver to Melbourne families

A group of selfless Sikh volunteers have reached out for nearly six months of consecutive days to donate hearty meals to families in need in Melbourne.

Sikh Volunteers Australia reached 189 consecutive days on Tuesday donating free curries to underprivileged people in the city.

The volunteer group posted a video on their social media channels on Monday showing chefs hard at work in the kitchen getting their food deliveries ready for the day.

The footage shows five volunteers packing dozens of containers filled with rice, salad and curry while listening to music in their industrial cooking house.

Sikh volunteers Australia donated food (pictured) 189 consecutive days to Melbournians in need during the coronavirus pandemic

Sikh volunteers Australia donated food (pictured) 189 consecutive days to Melbournians in need during the coronavirus pandemic

Volunteer Coordinator Manpreet Singh told Daily Mail Australia that the organization’s 189-day donation series had happened organically.

“We started on March 18 for two weeks because of government announcements and it slowly got up to more days and just happened continuously,” Singh said.

“We received continued support from our community and volunteers, so we continued to expand our service to nearly six months.”

The organization was founded in 2014, with their food delivery service starting in 2017 in honor of Sikh First Master Guru Nanak Dev Ji, who started a free food service in the 15th century to help those in need.

They began serving food to homeless people twice a week, but have grown into their full-day operation in response to COVID-19.

More than 260 volunteers participated in the organization during the pandemic, including 35 people every day to help prepare food, cook and deliver meals.

At their peak, the organization delivers up to 900 meals a day to six municipalities in the city

At their peak, the organization delivers up to 900 meals a day to six municipalities in the city

At their peak, the organization delivers up to 900 meals a day to six municipalities in the city

Their meals are given to the elderly, the unemployed, health workers and COVID people

Their meals are given to the elderly, the unemployed, health workers and COVID people

Their meals are given to the elderly, the unemployed, health workers and COVID people

Ten vehicles transport food via contactless delivery to six municipalities in Melbourne, including City of Casey, Frankston, Dandenong, Monash, Mornington Peninsula and Kingston.

The organization celebrated their 100,000th meal delivery on September 16, with daily delivery numbers fluctuating with the pandemic.

Singh said the group peaked at 900 meals a day during the initial shutdown.

“We currently go out 450 meals a day,” he said.

“Our food goes to the elderly, single mothers, the unemployed, international students, health workers and people struggling with COVID-19.”

The organization delivered meals to thousands of residents trapped in the towers of Melbourne’s housing committee in July.

“When the news got out, we got a few reports that people needed help,” Mr. Singh said.

Sikh Volunteers Australia's delivery service is run in honor of Sikh First Master Guru Nanak Dev Ji, who started a free food service in the 15th century to help those in need

Sikh Volunteers Australia's delivery service is run in honor of Sikh First Master Guru Nanak Dev Ji, who started a free food service in the 15th century to help those in need

Sikh Volunteers Australia food delivery is carried out in honor of Sikh First Master Guru Nanak Dev Ji who started a free food service in the 15th century to help those in need

“We didn’t have a lot of information, we just loaded up our vans and served there for seven days.”

Sikh Volunteers Australia works through donations of time and money from people and businesses in the wider community.

Mr Singh said the community’s generosity has allowed their service to continue without any sign of delay in the future.

“The community response has been overwhelming,” he said.

“Within six months we have received so many messages from people who are so grateful for this service.

‘Many people have lost their jobs due to the pandemic and it will take a long time for everything to return to normal, maybe even years.

“We will keep this service going because it still bother people so much.”

Volunteer Coordinator Manpreet Singh told Daily Mail Australia that the organization currently serves 450 meals a day

Volunteer Coordinator Manpreet Singh told Daily Mail Australia that the organization currently serves 450 meals a day

Volunteer Coordinator Manpreet Singh told Daily Mail Australia that the organization currently serves 450 meals a day

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