Short dog syndrome: smaller males urinate on higher lamp posts to make them look bigger

Cornell researchers now believe that some small dogs try to trick the system by tilting their pee so that it goes higher than their actual body size.

According to the researchers, the smaller dogs urinate more on the objects to deceive other dogs and think that they are bigger.

Male dogs spray urine as an "odor marker" for others, and it is known to include information about their age, health, sex, and size.

However, researchers now believe that some small dogs try to trick the system by tilting their pee to go higher than their actual body size.

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Cornell researchers now believe that some small dogs try to trick the system by tilting their pee so that it goes higher than their actual body size.

Cornell researchers now believe that some small dogs try to trick the system by tilting their pee so that it goes higher than their actual body size.

WHY PET DOGS PEE SO MUCH?

Odor marking is a common mode of communication in mammals.

Male dogs spray urine as an "odor marker" for others, researchers say.

In this way, fragrance marking is considered an "honest signal" that transmits accurate information to potential competitors and is related to the animal's attributes.

Researchers at Cornell University led by Betty McGuire found that small dogs urinated more often than larger dogs, and were more likely to urinate toward vertically oriented targets.

"Small adult male dogs can place higher urine marks, relative to their own body size, than older adult male dogs to exaggerate their competitive ability," the researchers wrote in the Journal of Zoology.

The team videotaped the voices of adult male dogs and then measured the height of the urine marks and the degree of raised leg angles.

They discovered that small dogs tipped their legs proportionately more when urinating than larger dogs, and they marked more height than expected for their size.

"Our findings support the raised leg angle as a proxy for the height of the urine mark and provide additional evidence that the fragrance mark may be dishonest," they wrote.

They discovered that small dogs tipped their legs proportionately more when urinating than larger dogs, and they marked more height than expected for their size.

They discovered that small dogs tipped their legs proportionately more when urinating than larger dogs, and they marked more height than expected for their size.

They discovered that small dogs tipped their legs proportionately more when urinating than larger dogs, and they marked more height than expected for their size.

"The small males seemed to make an extra effort to lift their legs, some small males would almost fall," McGuire told New Scientist.

The team believes that the move may be to try an avid confrontation with larger dogs.

"Assuming that body size is a substitute for competitive ability, small adult male dogs can place higher urine marks, relative to their own body size, than older adult male dogs to exaggerate their competitive ability," he concluded. the team.

"Direct social interactions with other dogs can be particularly risky for small dogs," says McGuire.

This risk may be the reason why small dogs seem to prefer the marking of odors, and they do so more often than large dogs; it allows them to establish a presence without interacting directly with competitors.

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