Shoppers slam Zara’s Barbie collection for committing ‘unrealistic body type’

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Zara’s new collaboration with Mattel’s Barbie has sparked outrage online – with many slamming the collection for promoting an ‘unrealistic body type’.

The predominantly pink eight-piece activewear collection includes a hoodie, joggers, a long-sleeved top, shorts, t-shirts and swimwear.

Zara also sells limited edition Barbie dolls for £ 29.95, with all proceeds going to the Spanish charity Entreculturas, which helps develop educational activities.

Take to Instagram account @BuienRadarNL, one furious shop wrote, “ Okay, aside from being a complete trainwreck of a collection destined to be dumped, Zara’s recent Barbie collection has raised a lot of really interesting and justifiable concerns among our followers on the subject of perpetuating Barbie’s unrealistic body type. ‘

When most brands seem to be aware that the average dress size for women in the UK is a 16 and they start showing diversity in sizes in their images, Zara has always dug the heels in the ground in this regard.

Zara's new collaboration with Mattel's Barbie has sparked outrage online - with many slamming the collection for promoting an 'unrealistic body type'.  Pictured: Bikini top with detachable cup and straight neckline

Zara’s new collaboration with Mattel’s Barbie has sparked outrage online – with many slamming the collection for promoting an ‘unrealistic body type’. Pictured: Bikini top with detachable cup and straight neckline

The collection includes a hoodie, sweatpants, a long-sleeved top, shorts, t-shirts and swimwear.  Pictured pants with high waist, elasticated waistband and adjustable drawstrings

The collection includes a hoodie, sweatpants, a long-sleeved top, shorts, t-shirts and swimwear. Pictured pants with high waist, elasticated waistband and adjustable drawstrings

A frustrated customer called the collection 'an utter train wreck destined for landfill' (photo)

A frustrated customer called the collection ‘an utter train wreck destined for landfill’ (photo)

It continued, ‘At a time when EDs are rightly discussed more than ever as harmful to young women, a collection honoring a plastic doll has proportions impossible to achieve by a real human – with creative direction, such as photography from a low angle, designed to elongate their bodies to a level of deformation – feels deaf. ‘

The person urged their 46,300 followers to go to the comments section if they wanted to, hoping to get the retailer to listen to people’s reactions – and it didn’t take long for people to do just that.

“I think it’s the term ‘unrealistic’ that we should focus on here,” wrote one. As someone who is aware of being healthy – not carrying extra fat on my body and also not being underweight, I think that ‘skinny shaming’ is just as harmful as promoting obesity as ‘normal’.

“I think companies that influence the weight and image of girls should try harder to be realistic, that’s all.”

In response to the photos (in the photo), one person commented, 'I think it's the term "unrealistic" we should focus on this'

In response to the photos (in the photo) one person commented, ‘I think it’s the term’ unrealistic ‘that we should focus on here’

Another told how they were 'disappointed' and that they thought the 'skewed boy image' was left in the 90s (photo)

Another told how they were ‘disappointed’ and that they thought the ‘skewed boy image’ was left in the 90s (photo)

Another shared how they struggled to determine “what the message should be” – adding, “This is hurting my brain.”

A third said they saw the marketing as a ‘missed opportunity’ and explained, ‘Barbie’s strength is that she can be whoever she wants: she can be a princess, a doctor, a mother, an astronaut and so on.

“Instead, this campaign appears to be promoting Barbie as a body type that women should aspire to.”

Meanwhile, a fourth commented, ‘Seriously Zara: I really thought we left this distorted body image in the 90s? Disappointed, ‘while another added,’ This is so unattainable. ‘

Elsewhere, others took a different view and spoke out in defense of the campaign (photo)

Elsewhere, others took a different view and spoke out in defense of the campaign (photo)

However, others took a different view and spoke out in defense of the campaign.

‘The collection images give me the creeps, but as a skinny girl, the term’ unrealistic body type ‘has always been a trigger point when referring to skinny girls,’ wrote one.

Skinny girls are not ‘not normal’ or ‘unhealthy’ (although some may be, I won’t take that away.) I agree we need diversity, but so are the skinny girls and I don’t think it’s fair to be offensive or demeaning to thin just because the media has done damage. ‘

A second commented, “No. I prefer a thinner aesthetic and prefer to see clothes on thinner models. I just don’t think much of the stuff hangs well on larger models, with a few exceptions, and that I would be much less likely to buy for it. ‘