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The police have revealed the effects of class A drugs by releasing a photo of a slender 53-year-old heroin addicted woman. Graham is pictured for her arrest

Shocking photos show effects of class A drugs on a slender 53-year-old woman whose heroin and cocaine addictions were so bad that many neighbors were forced to leave

  • The police released photos of Lynley Graham after she was sentenced to 18 months
  • She was accused of possession of class A drug with the intention of delivering
  • Drug addiction and abuse contributed to 3,756 deaths in the UK in 2017
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The police have revealed the effects of class A drugs by releasing a photo of a slender 53-year-old heroin addicted woman.

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Etched with broken lines in her face and chiselled cheeks to the bone, this is the face of a woman who demonstrates the dramatic extent of substance abuse.

Lynley Graham's weak and weak figure is the victim of years of drug use and addiction.

The custody photo was released by Humberside Police when Graham was imprisoned for 18 months for drug offenses.

The police have revealed the effects of class A drugs by releasing a photo of a slender 53-year-old heroin addicted woman. Graham is pictured for her arrest

Lynley Graham has now been sentenced to 18 months in prison after finding heroin and cocaine and accused of possession of a class A drug with the intention of delivering

Lynley Graham has now been sentenced to 18 months in prison after finding heroin and cocaine and accused of possession of a class A drug with the intention of delivering

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The police have revealed the effects of class A drugs by releasing a photo of a slender 53-year-old heroin addicted woman. Lynley Graham has now been sentenced to 18 months in prison after finding heroin and cocaine and accused of possession of a class A drug with the intention of delivering

Graham was arrested after tips from the public in the seaside town of Withernsea.

Her behavior was so bad that many neighbors were forced to leave the area.

She was found in possession of class A drugs including heroin and cocaine and was subsequently accused of having a class A drug with the intention of delivering.

On the Humberside Police Facebook page, users could quickly point out the toll that the abuse had taken.

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Christine Storey said: & I am 64, I look young compared to her. Is she perhaps a lesson in what drug abuse can do to your skin? & # 39;

Chloe Smith said: “She may need help, but this is a photo you should show to teenage drug users to try and deter them from drug use, because she looks 80 so let's see what drugs do to you & # 39;

And Pat Beischer said: & # 39; Linley was a sweet girl when she was younger, just show you what drugs can do. & # 39;

Drug addiction and abuse can tear families apart, devastate lives and contributed to more than 3,756 British deaths in 2017.

On the Humberside Police Facebook page, users could quickly point out the toll that the abuse had taken

On the Humberside Police Facebook page, users could quickly point out the toll that the abuse had taken

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On the Humberside Police Facebook page, users could quickly point out the toll that the abuse had taken

Continued drug use can lead to abscesses, tooth decay – or & # 39; meth mouth & # 39; as is generally known – and premature aging of the skin, which often adds someone decades.

Perhaps one of the most worrying and surprising consequences of the consumption of Class A drugs is the skeletal characteristics.

Drugs affect almost every system in the body, and bloodshot eyes, dilated pupils, swollen faces, and discolored skin are all noticeable signs of drug abuse. It can also be a steep and rapid change, with faces and figures being destroyed in a few years in some cases.

Graham was arrested after tips from the public in the seaside town of Withernsea. Stock photo

Graham was arrested after tips from the public in the seaside town of Withernsea. Stock photo

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Graham was arrested after tips from the public in the seaside town of Withernsea. Stock photo

Heavy methamphetamine users can develop dull skin and self-injured wounds caused by users plucking their face and body to reduce the feeling of insects crawling under their skin.

The skeletal appearance is often the result of a suppression of the appetite, mainly because meals are not regularly consumed.

Cocaine can lead to chronic skin ulcers, pus-filled skin and the development of Buerger's disease, an inflammation in small and medium blood vessels.

Heroin also has the ability to reduce the moisture content in the epidermis – the outermost layer of the skin – which contributes to dry, aged and itchy skin, often up to decades of a person's appearance.

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