Home Sports Shoaib Bashir takes four wickets to put England in control of fourth Test against India – with tourists 134 ahead at the end of day two in Ranchi

Shoaib Bashir takes four wickets to put England in control of fourth Test against India – with tourists 134 ahead at the end of day two in Ranchi

by Alexander
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Shoaib Bashir took four wickets to put England in control of the fourth Test against India

The HWhat Ben Stokes had when he watched Shoaib Bashir take his first tentative steps into first class last summer is proving more inspired by the day.

The England captain saw something he liked in that social media clip of raw bowling in one of the greats, Alastair Cook, and quickly told Brendon McCullum and Rob Key of his discovery.

What visceral instinct was on display on Saturday when the boy with just six appearances and a modest record for Somerset behind him before this tour became a man here by leading England to what would be an extraordinary series-levelling victory over India.

Remember, the 20-year-old had taken just 10 costly wickets when he was called up and was described by GM Key as potentially England’s next great spinner.

That seemed anything but hyperbole on the second day of the fourth Test when Bashir ripped the heart out of India’s batting and, with the almost as inexperienced Tom Hartley, steered England into a dominant position on an increasingly dangerous pitch.

Shoaib Bashir took four wickets to put England in control of the fourth Test against India

Shoaib Bashir took four wickets to put England in control of the fourth Test against India

England took a lead of 134 at the end of the second day in Ranchi thanks to their efforts.

England took a lead of 134 at the end of the second day in Ranchi thanks to their efforts.

England took a lead of 134 at the end of the second day in Ranchi thanks to their efforts.

First, Joe Root extended his hundred to an unbeaten 122 and Ollie Robinson made his first Test half-century before England were bowled out for 353 having scored 112 for five and almost out of the series at lunch on the first day.

Bashir then took four for 84, unsurprisingly the best figures of his fledgling career, as India struggled to cope with the uneven bounce and convert the England newcomer plucked from the cracked surface from his height of 6ft 4 inches.

And with the equally tall Hartley, whose introduction was delayed by Stokes to 32nd, joining in the fun by taking two wickets from his own India, at 219 for seven at last, they are still 134 behind and face the dangerous prospect of batting last .

It is no exaggeration to say that no other England regime would have gone for such an inexperienced player to take on the best slow bowlers in world cricket in their own backyard.

It is also no exaggeration to say that no England captain, barring Stokes, would have shown such faith and trust, not to mention expert handling, in so many young bowlers, particularly spinners, when introduced to the highest level.

Stokes was upset when Bashir’s first tour with England got off to a false start when he had to return home from his training camp in Abu Dhabi to sort out issues with his Indian visa due to his Pakistani heritage.

That controversy ruled him out of the first Test, but Stokes did not hesitate to bowl Bashir to the second as he took four wickets and made a favorable impression in hyped company in the second game at Visakhapatnam.

Now, after being left out for the third as England opted for a more balanced attack, Bashir was back to bowling on the kind of exceptionally dry, cratered surface he would never have seen before in his club and second team. experience.

Joe Root extended his hundred to an unbeaten 122 and Ollie Robinson made his first Test half-century.

Joe Root extended his hundred to an unbeaten 122 and Ollie Robinson made his first Test half-century.

Joe Root extended his hundred to an unbeaten 122 and Ollie Robinson made his first Test half-century.

England had been almost out of the series at lunch on the first day at 112 for five, but have recovered gloriously.

England had been almost out of the series at lunch on the first day at 112 for five, but have recovered gloriously.

England had been almost out of the series at lunch on the first day at 112 for five, but have recovered gloriously.

Those helpful conditions may have raised expectations on Bashir, but he again had the perfect captain to guide him in Stokes, who brought him on for the ninth over.

That came after a bowler at the other end of the experience scale, Jimmy Anderson, took his 697th Test wicket to send back captain Rohit Sharma, nibbling one that drifted wide outside off stump.

There was immediate support and attacking grounds for Bashir and how he responded even though Yashasvi Jaiswal did his best to discourage the newcomer by smashing him for his 23rd six of an outstanding series.

Bashir was not deterred, bowling unchanged in a 14-over spell between lunch and tea and taking three for five in a 41-ball spell to send back Shubman Gill, Rajat Patidar and Ravindra Jadeja.

When Bashir forced one through Jaiswal’s defences, with the help of a lower edge, during a spell of 31 overs interrupted only by the tea interval, he had taken four wickets for the first time in a first-class innings.

And, to add perspective, he had taken his first four-wicket haul against anyone in the Northants Second XI senior cricket bar for the Somerset two towards the end of last summer.

Hartley had Sarfaraz Khan caught brilliantly by a diving Root at slip (what a difference a Test has made for him) and then had Ravichandran Ashwin take the third narrow lbw decision, judged by technology as the umpire’s decision in favor of England in the innings.

It must be remembered that this is a form of dismissal, Stokes asked to be abolished after England was crushed in Rajkot, but although the vicissitudes of the DRS accompanied England, this time they were again on the wrong side of technology when Jaiswal was 40 years.

India’s new batting star was concerned about Robinson’s medium pace, which rarely exceeded 75 miles per hour on his return to England and overtook him just ahead of Zak Crawley at slip at one before then moving towards Ben Foakes.

As is customary with low catches, the umpires abdicated their responsibility and went upstairs where television official Joel Wilson ruled that the ball had not appeared on the foreshortened television evidence. A side angle that Wilson apparently didn’t see later appeared to show that the ball had indeed been carried.

Honestly, these calls are so unsatisfactory that the game would be better off reverting to the referees making the decision on the evidence of their own eyes and the defender’s word.

Dhruv Jurel and Kuldeep Yadav bounced back with an unbeaten stand of 42 at the end, but India remain far behind and England, thanks to the young spinner they plucked from obscurity, are very much in the driving seat.

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