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Shipwreck in Maine is identified as a British ship that went missing during the Battle of Yorktown

The skeletal remains of a shipwreck in the Maine coastline have been identified as a British ship from the Battle of Yorktown.

The ship is moored on Short Sands beach and has been exposed to storms tearing through the area several times in the past.

The wreck, which consists of the bottom of the hull, is about 50 feet long and was 60 feet before it was destroyed.

Researchers who examined the ship used drones equipped with geographic dating technology to determine that it was built in 1754 and laid in a sand grave sometime in 1769.

In addition to identifying it as a Revolutionary Warship, the team also believes it was the ship known as the ‘Defiance’, a cargo ship with a crew of four, flour, pork and other supplies when it hit rocks at Cape Neddick Cove during a storm.

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The skeletal remains of a shipwreck off the coast of Maine have been identified as a British ship from the Battle of Yorktown. The ship is stuck in Short Sands beach and has been exposed to storms tearing through the area several times in the past

The skeletal remains of a shipwreck off the coast of Maine have been identified as a British ship from the Battle of Yorktown. The ship is stuck in Short Sands beach and has been exposed to storms tearing through the area several times in the past

The Battle of Yorktown is considered to be the “great battle of the American Revolutionary War.”

The British Army surrendered on October 19, 1781, forcing their government to discuss a peace treaty with the Americans.

About 8,000 British soldiers stormed the beach to be outnumbered by American and French forces, forcing General Cornwallis to raise the white flag to surrender.

And the shipwreck is a reminder of the American’s victory that day.

The wreck, which consists of the bottom of the hull, is about 50 feet long and was 60 feet before it was destroyed. Researchers who examined the ship used drones equipped with geographic dating technology to determine that it was built in 1754 and laid in its sand grave sometime in 1769.

The wreck, which consists of the bottom of the hull, is about 50 feet long and was 60 feet before it was destroyed. Researchers who examined the ship used drones equipped with geographic dating technology to determine that it was built in 1754 and laid in its sand grave sometime in 1769.

The wreck, which consists of the bottom of the hull, is about 50 feet long and was 60 feet before it was destroyed. Researchers who examined the ship used drones equipped with geographic dating technology to determine that it was built in 1754 and laid in its sand grave sometime in 1769.

In addition to identifying it as a Revolutionary Warship, the team also believes it was the ship known as the 'Defiance', a cargo ship with a crew of four, flour, pork and other supplies when it hit rocks at Cape Neddick Cove during a storm

In addition to identifying it as a Revolutionary Warship, the team also believes it was the ship known as the 'Defiance', a cargo ship with a crew of four, flour, pork and other supplies when it hit rocks at Cape Neddick Cove during a storm

In addition to identifying it as a Revolutionary Warship, the team also believes it was the ship known as the ‘Defiance’, a cargo ship with a crew of four, flour, pork and other supplies when it hit rocks at Cape Neddick Cove during a storm

However, the wooden remains have not been identified for years.

A storm had first revealed the ship in the 1950s, again in 1960, 1983, 2013 and finally in 2018 when experts finally decided to investigate its origins.

The project, led by Stefan Claesson, a certified unmanned aerial vehicle (UAS) map scientist, used a range of archaeological techniques, scientific dating and documentary research to date the ship, according to AncientOrigins.net.

With his specialty, Claesson unleashed a drone with a Geographic Information System (GIS) to map and investigate the site.

A storm had first revealed the ship in the 1950s (pictured), again in 1960, 1983, 2013 and finally in 2018 when experts finally decided to investigate its origins

A storm had first revealed the ship in the 1950s (pictured), again in 1960, 1983, 2013 and finally in 2018 when experts finally decided to investigate its origins

A storm had first revealed the ship in the 1950s (pictured), again in 1960, 1983, 2013 and finally in 2018 when experts finally decided to investigate its origins

The project, led by Stefan Claesson, a certified unmanned aerial vehicle (UAS) mapping scientist, used a range of archaeological techniques, scientific dating and documentary research to date the vessel

The project, led by Stefan Claesson, a certified unmanned aerial vehicle (UAS) mapping scientist, used a range of archaeological techniques, scientific dating and documentary research to date the vessel

The project, led by Stefan Claesson, a certified unmanned aerial vehicle (UAS) mapping scientist, used a range of archaeological techniques, scientific dating and documentary research to date the vessel

Prior to this work, the ship had been a mystery to residents, as it would only appear during a storm and then be reburied by sand drifts.

Now Claesson and his team think they have unraveled its secrets.

They determined that the ship dates from the mid-eighteenth century and was built in 1754 with wood cut from trees in 1753.

It was about 60 feet long when it sailed the ocean, but the surviving structure is only 50 feet.

Prior to this work, the ship had been a mystery to residents as it would only appear during a storm and then be reburied by moving sand

Prior to this work, the ship had been a mystery to residents as it would only appear during a storm and then be reburied by moving sand

Prior to this work, the ship had been a mystery to residents as it would only appear during a storm and then be reburied by moving sand

They determined that the ship dates from the mid-eighteenth century and was built in 1754 with wood cut from trees in 1753. It was about 60 feet long when it sailed the ocean, but the remaining structure is only 50 feet

They determined that the ship dates from the mid-eighteenth century and was built in 1754 with wood cut from trees in 1753. It was about 60 feet long when it sailed the ocean, but the remaining structure is only 50 feet

They determined that the ship dates from the mid-eighteenth century and was built in 1754 with wood cut from trees in 1753. It was about 60 feet long when it sailed the ocean, but the remaining structure is only 50 feet

After determining the data, Claesson went looking for the ship itself.

He examined the archives of the Peabody Essex Museum and searched the archives of Daniel Moulton, a local notary who documented all wrecks in Maine between 1750 and 1794.

“I think it’s the boat Defiance,” Claesson said Newsbreak.

“I think the ship is a pink, a kind of freighter.”

“Defiance fits every description.”

Additional investigations revealed that the Defiance left Salem, Massachusetts for Casco Bay in Portland, Maine on its last voyage.

On board were four crew members, four, flour, pork and other supplies when it held a cluster in the rocks of Cape Neddick Cove during a storm.

The crew survived the impact, but the ship was lost.

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