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Shelley Luther, owner of a salon in Dallas, says she doesn’t regret not defying the Texas home order

The owner of the Dallas salon who was in jail for refusing to shut down her company during the coronavirus pandemic, described her two-day stint in lock-up as “not pleasant” – but says she doesn’t regret the decisions made there have brought.

Shelley Luther spoke Fox news host Sean Hannity on Thursday evening hours after she walked free from the Lew Sterrett Justice Center after the Texas Supreme Court ordered her release.

Salon A La Mode’s owner was sentenced to seven days in prison on Tuesday for refusing to close her business in accordance with state domestic orders.

District judge Eric Moye, who gave the sentence, had given Luther the option of avoiding prison if she apologized for what he described as her “selfish” behavior, paid a fine, and kept her doors closed until the salon restrictions were lifted.

But Luther disagreed with those terms, and on Thursday she told Hannity she supports that decision.

“Frankly, that was the last thing I was going to do,” she said. “I just couldn’t, I couldn’t apologize.”

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Shelley Luther, owner of the Dallas salon who was in jail for refusing to shut down her business during the coronavirus pandemic, described her two-day stint in lock-up as `` uncomfortable '' in an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity on Thursday evening

Shelley Luther, the owner of the Dallas salon who was jailed for refusing to shut down her company during the coronavirus pandemic, described her two-day stint in lock-up as “not pleasant” in an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity on Thursday evening

The interview came hours after Luther walked free from the Lew Sterrett Justice Center after the Texas Supreme Court ordered her to release her

The interview came hours after Luther walked free from the Lew Sterrett Justice Center after the Texas Supreme Court ordered her to release her

The interview came hours after Luther walked free from the Lew Sterrett Justice Center after the Texas Supreme Court ordered her to release her

Luther said the two days she spent in prison were “uncomfortable” – partly because she was lonely in her cell.

“The worst part was that I wasn’t allowed to call anyone all night when I got there,” she said.

“And that’s kind of scary because I have a daughter who just turned 17 at home, and if my boyfriend wasn’t there to tell you, you know, to talk to her or something, I wouldn’t have come home and she wouldn’t have known where I was. ‘

Luther, the owner of Salon A La Mode, was sentenced to seven days in prison on Tuesday for refusing to close her business in accordance with the state's state-owned properties. She is depicted in her mugshot

Luther, the owner of Salon A La Mode, was sentenced to seven days in prison on Tuesday for refusing to close her business in accordance with the state's state-owned properties. She is depicted in her mugshot

Luther, the owner of Salon A La Mode, was sentenced to seven days in prison on Tuesday for refusing to close her business in accordance with the state’s state-owned properties. She is depicted in her mugshot

Luther complied with the shutdown orders when they were first passed on March 22, but after seeing them renewed over and over for weeks, she got frustrated.

“Dallas County judge Clay Jenkins kept pushing back the date we would open weeks in advance before hearing anything new about what happened to masks or anything,” she said.

“When he finally pushed it back one last time, I just woke up one day and said, ‘I have to open, my stylists are calling me, they’re not finishing their mortgage. I am two months late on my mortgage. “

“My stylists told me they wanted to [to go] go underground and go to people’s houses, “she continued. “I just said,” You know, that’s not a good idea, because we can’t control the environment there. We don’t know if it’s been disinfected or anything, “and I just decided I’d open it.”

Luther reopened her salon on April 24, despite the home stay. She insisted that the salon set strict sanitary and social distance measures at the time.

She said the stylists tried to use gloves first, but they couldn’t work with them.

“But,” she said, “we made sure that there were no customers waiting in the salon at all. I had chairs six feet away from the salon, and when the hairdresser was done and wearing a mask – we didn’t let clients in without a mask – they immediately cleaned their hands, the hairstylist cleaned their hands. They came in, they cut and that person left. ‘

Luther imagined that he received a quote from Dallas City officials on April 24

Luther imagined that he received a quote from Dallas City officials on April 24

Luther imagined that he received a quote from Dallas City officials on April 24

She received multiple quotes for opening her company against the state orders, including a letter of penalty from the Dallas County judge Clay Jenkins on April 24.

The next day at an Open Texas meeting to reopen businesses in Frisco, Texas, she saw the letter tear to pieces for a cheering crowd.

Subsequently, on April 28, she received a temporary restraining order issued by the court instructing her to close her business.

Luther continued to ignore court orders and shared a Facebook Live video last week saying she intended to remain fully open and that it was her right.

“I’m still here, I’m here for your rights, and Salon A La Mode is open for business,” she said.

Luther argued that her business should be open because hair stylists have to work to take care of their families.

She also said that her salon is a safe and clean environment that does not threaten the spread of COVID-19.

Judge Moyé found Luther in the criminal and civil contempt of the court and offered her the option of avoiding prison if she apologized for being “selfish.”

She refused to admit that she had done something wrong and said to the judge, “I don’t agree with you, sir, when you say that I am selfish because feeding my children is not selfish. I have hungry hairdressers because they prefer to feed their children. So, sir, if you think the law is more important than children who are fed, continue with your decision. But I’m not going to close the salon. ‘

“Opposition to the court order was open, blatant and deliberate,” Moyé wrote in his decision.

“Although the defendants have been given an opportunity to do so, they have not repented, regretted, or regretted their contemptuous conduct.”

Luther can be seen at the Open Texas Rally in Frisco on April 25. During the rally, she tore down the quote the state had given her for opening her salon

Luther can be seen at the Open Texas Rally in Frisco on April 25. During the rally, she tore down the quote the state had given her for opening her salon

Luther can be seen at the Open Texas Rally in Frisco on April 25. During the rally, she tore down the quote the state had given her for opening her salon

Luther’s case has become a symbol of the rift that plagues America as protesters defy the orders of those at home to march to the capital’s buildings and end the closings, which they say destroy their freedom and make business , irreparably damage jobs and the economy.

Shelley Luther versus Texas home delivery

April 24th Shelley Luther defies the stay-at-home in Texas and reopens Salon A La Mode. She will receive a penalty payment from Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

April 25 Luther attends an Open Texas protest in Frisco and sees the judge’s letter tearing to pieces for a cheering crowd.

April 25 – Luther receives a temporary restraining order issued by the court with the order to close her company.

5th of May – Luther appears in court where she is sentenced to seven days behind bars for repeatedly challenging restrictions on those staying at home and court orders to close her business.

6 May – State officials, including Governor Abbott, are asking for her release, and protesters are gathering in front of the Dallas Municipal Court building on Wednesday.

May 7 – Governor Abbott amends his executive order to lift imprisonment as a penalty for non-compliance. The Texas Supreme Court then orders Luther’s release. Luther walks free from prison to a crowd of supporters.

The decision to put her behind bars sparked much protest from high-ranking state officials and anti-lockdown protesters demanding that she be released.

It took the Supreme Court time to make that happen.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott amended his executive order on Thursday morning, removing the possibility for citizens to be incarcerated for violating home orders.

His amendment applied to the conviction retroactively from 2 April.

The governor had forged the decision of the district judge, Eric Moyé, to imprison Luther and obey her release.

“Putting Texans in prison who shut down their businesses through no fault of their own is nonsensical, and I will not allow this to happen,” he said in a statement Thursday morning.

“That is why I am changing my executive orders to ensure that incarceration is not a penalty for breaking an order.”

Abbott mentioned the salon owner in the announcement, saying his order “will replace local orders and if used properly should free Shelley Luther.”

Luther turned the Lew Sterrett Justice Center into a heroic welcome for multitudes of supporters who had gathered to demand her release.

Crowds cheered “Shelley is free!” and clapped as she got out of prison, with lots of waving banners and balloons.

The emotional salon owner choked back tears as she thanked the crowds, saying she was “overwhelmed” with their support.

Luther cried when she was welcomed as a hero on Thursday when she got out of prison

Luther cried when she was welcomed as a hero on Thursday when she got out of prison

Luther cried when she was welcomed as a hero on Thursday when she got out of prison

The emotional salon owner embraced supporters who had gathered outside the prison, where she had been in isolation and custody for the past two days

The emotional salon owner embraced supporters who had gathered outside the prison, where she had been in isolation and custody for the past two days

The emotional salon owner embraced supporters who had gathered outside the prison, where she had been in isolation and custody for the past two days

Supporters gathered outside the Justice Center to welcome Luther to her release. Luther also received support from several senior state officials who condemned the judge's decision to imprison her

Supporters gathered outside the Justice Center to welcome Luther to her release. Luther also received support from several senior state officials who condemned the judge's decision to imprison her

Supporters gathered outside the Justice Center to welcome Luther to her release. Luther also received support from several senior state officials who condemned the judge’s decision to imprison her

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