Seven-year-old who died after waiting in hospital was ‘overlooked’ – staff have been cut, allegations

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The fallout from the tragic death of a seven-year-old in a Perth hospital escalated with the recognition that the extremely ill girl may have been ‘overlooked’ – and claims that staff cuts put patients at risk.

Western Australian Health Minister Roger Cook admitted that Aishwarya Aswath may have been missed when he called for an urgent investigation into her death at Perth Children’s Hospital last Saturday.

Her devastated parents claim they repeatedly begged the hospital reception staff for help because the little girl’s eyes went cloudy and her hands got cold – but they had to wait more than two hours to be seen.

Aishwarya Aswath died after allegedly waiting two hours for emergency treatment at Perth Children's Hospital, her parents claim.

Aishwarya Aswath died after allegedly waiting two hours for emergency treatment at Perth Children’s Hospital, her parents claim.

Now, staff at the hospital under fire allege that the nurse-patient relationship has become dangerous, with cuts in the number of nursing staff putting patients at risk.

A nurse in Perth recalled eight nurses who attempted to care for 93 patients on a recent shift, 7 News reported.

The nurse said that this ratio was dangerous, but that it “became the norm” due to staff cuts during Covid.

There were also ‘several other incidents resulting in significant damage’.

The circumstances surrounding Aishwarya's death will be the subject of an internal investigation

The circumstances surrounding Aishwarya's death will be the subject of an internal investigation

The circumstances surrounding Aishwarya’s death will be the subject of an internal investigation

Another Perth mom, Emma, ​​claimed that her extremely ill two-year-old – Amanda – had twice been expelled from the Perth Children’s Hospital ERP.

Amanda was later diagnosed with sepsis and was at risk for organ failure, but she miraculously survived.

“I’m angry, you know I hoped they would have woken up to what happened to Amanda,” Emma said.

A mother who took her one-year-old son to Perth Children’s Hospital on the same night Aishwarya Aswath was dying in the reception area claimed the child was ‘easily’ the sickest while there.

“ The whole process there that night was regrettable, ” said the woman, who chose to remain anonymous. WAToday“This whole system has failed that young family and my heart breaks for them.”

Nurses at Perth Children's Hospital have defended themselves saying that staff shortages put patients at risk

Nurses at Perth Children's Hospital have defended themselves saying that staff shortages put patients at risk

Nurses at Perth Children’s Hospital have defended themselves saying the staff shortage puts patients at risk

Emergency departments in Western Australia have been crying out for help for months, said Australian Medical Association WA president Dr. Andrew Miller.

“ We know bad things are happening, we know people get sick and die, even children, but what families need in this day and age is to know that everything possible has been done, even if the worst outcome was inevitable here, ” said Dr. Miller to Perth. radio 6PR.

The WA government blamed additional mental health demands, staff shortages and strict Covid cleaning standards for delays in treating patients.

“We were a couple of doctors that night,” Health Secretary Roger Cook told reporters.

“Obviously, it is an essential part of running an emergency department in any dynamic environment.”

Aswath Sasidharan in the photo left with the youngster's mother, Prasitha Sasidharan.  He broke down when he called for authorities to investigate his daughter's death

Aswath Sasidharan in the photo left with the youngster's mother, Prasitha Sasidharan.  He broke down when he called for authorities to investigate his daughter's death

Aswath Sasidharan in the photo left with the youngster’s mother, Prasitha Sasidharan. He broke down when he called for authorities to investigate his daughter’s death

‘In a post-Covid world we see higher volumes and we see greater sharpness and complexity.’

Mr Cook acknowledged that the WA hospital system faced ‘challenges’ and said closing the border had made it difficult to hire staff.

The circumstances surrounding Aishwarya’s death will be the subject of an internal investigation by the Child and Adolescent Health Service, expected to last four to six weeks.

CAHS Chair Debbie Karasinski has revealed that four doctors in the hospital’s emergency department fell ill that night.

Aishwarya was rated as a category four patient, the second lowest urgency.

Ms. Karasinski was unable to provide details of the incident and said she did not know whether staff shortages were a contributing factor.

Aishwarya’s mother Prasitha Sasidharan claimed she was told that a doctor would “come and see,” but no one came for two hours.

WA Health Minister Roger Cook admitted that Aishwarya Aswath may have been 'overlooked'

WA Health Minister Roger Cook admitted that Aishwarya Aswath may have been 'overlooked'

WA Health Minister Roger Cook admitted that Aishwarya Aswath may have been ‘overlooked’

‘I asked them … change her eyes, they asked if it’s normal and I said’ it’s not normal, she didn’t have it before ‘,’ ‘Mrs. Sasidharan told 9 News

‘We begged them to come and have a look. They didn’t think it was an emergency.

“I’ve been to the front desk maybe four or five times. I literally begged them “please help, please help”. ‘

The seven-year-old’s father, Aswath Chavittupara, was devastated when he called for authorities to investigate his daughter’s death.

‘I loved my daughter. This should never happen to another child in this country, ”he said.

The hospital management offered the family their ‘sincere condolences’.

Her death is also being investigated by the coroner.