Serial burglar, 42, exposes $ 140,000 in Mission Impossible-style raids

The Cat Burglar with a Cause: Serial killer, 42, who stole $ 140,000 in Mission Impossible-style missions reveals his surprising motivation

  • A father and a Perth businessman made several advanced disasters for money
  • Simon Paul Giacomel, 42, stole more than $ 140,000 from small businesses
  • His toolbox consisted of a lock-pick, a torch, a mask, a torch and a angle grinder

Kelsey Wilkie for daily post Australia

A cat burglar has revealed that he has stolen more than $ 140,000 in cash in refined late-night raids to help pay a debt to his dying father.

Simon Paul Giacomel, 42, was imprisoned for six and a half years after he was found guilty of 41 crimes in a district court in Western Australia last week.

The father and businessman from Perth founded 15 different small businesses across Western Australia, including petrol stations, fast food restaurants and TABs, on the hunt for cash in 2017.

Simon Paul Giacomel (pictured), 42, was imprisoned for six and a half years after he had pleaded guilty to 41 crimes in a district court in Western Australia last week

Simon Paul Giacomel (pictured), 42, was imprisoned for six and a half years after he had pleaded guilty to 41 crimes in a district court in Western Australia last week

The & # 39; professional & # 39; burglar targeted 15 different small businesses across Western Australia, including petrol stations, fast food restaurants and TABs, hunting for money in 2017

The & # 39; professional & # 39; burglar targeted 15 different small businesses across Western Australia, including petrol stations, fast food restaurants and TABs, hunting for money in 2017

The & # 39; professional & # 39; burglar targeted 15 different small businesses across Western Australia, including petrol stations, fast food restaurants and TABs, hunting for money in 2017

His dying father had lent him $ 400,000 to start a coffee roasting business and he was trying to raise funds to pay him back, the West reported.

Giacomel, all dressed in black and a balaclava, spent eighteen months stealthily building, cutting a hole in each roof, and carefully lowering himself with a tool bag.

Using an angle grinder, he broke into safes and put money – up to $ 19,000 in some cases – into his bag before he returned through the hole.

He started with more than $ 140,000 and caused $ 100,000 in damages before being arrested in August 2017.

Giacomel, who worked as a pilot technician and cable fan on ships, was discovered by the police who hid on the roof of a building.

He was accompanied by an accomplice, a walkie-talkie and a toolbox.

His dying father lent him $ 400,000 to start a coffee roasting business and he tried to raise funds to pay him back (CCTV footage)

His dying father lent him $ 400,000 to start a coffee roasting business and he tried to raise funds to pay him back (CCTV footage)

His dying father lent him $ 400,000 to start a coffee roasting business and he tried to raise funds to pay him back (CCTV footage)

Giacomel, a father and a businessman, spent eighteen months scaling buildings to scale, cutting a hole in each roof and carefully lowering them with a bag full of tools (CCTV footage)

Giacomel, a father and a businessman, spent eighteen months scaling buildings to scale, cutting a hole in each roof and carefully lowering them with a bag full of tools (CCTV footage)

Giacomel, a father and a businessman, spent eighteen months scaling buildings to scale, cutting a hole in each roof and carefully lowering them with a bag full of tools (CCTV footage)

When the police searched his home, they found balaclavas and a pair of shoes that corresponded with a print on a number of crime scenes.

Prosecutor Elizabeth Swann disputed the claim that Giacomel's crimes were well-intentioned because his criminal records showed a number of burglary charges from the late nineties.

"He has a particularly advanced and planned way of doing things and it must be said that he is doing well", said Mrs. Swann.

Judge Bruce Goetze said the crimes were aggravated because of the level of planning involved.

Companies must be able to be served … have their property, protect their cash, their product that they sell … without having to worry about someone breaking in, forcing open safes and stealing things. & # 39;

The 42-year-old father died in 2018.

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