Serena Williams defends her reaction to the referee in the US Open match

Serena Williams made headlines last year after losing her temper during the US Open final and flattening her racket, only for opponent Naomi Osaka to eventually win the game.

Her broken racket was the answer to a fight Serena had with the seat referee of the match, who believed that her coach, Patrick Mouratogloum, was coaching her from the sidelines. Serena denied the accusation but was still punished.

When she spoke with Business of Fashion in a new interview, the 37-year-old tennis player was asked if she regretted what happened during the game.

Frustrating loss: Serena Williams, 37, lost last year in the US Open finals against opponent Naomi Osaka during a heated game

Frustrating loss: Serena Williams, 37, lost last year in the US Open finals against opponent Naomi Osaka during a heated game

Angry: The match was controversial after a series of penalty's from the referee. One of the code violations resulted after Serena had thrown her racket

Angry: The match was controversial after a series of penalty's from the referee. One of the code violations resulted after Serena had thrown her racket

Angry: The match was controversial after a series of penalty's from the referee. One of the code violations resulted after Serena had thrown her racket

& # 39; That is really a loaded question, & # 39; Serena told the publication. & # 39; Do I regret being punished for something that has never happened in the history of tennis and that I have not used any curse word? And what do I feel sorry for? & # 39;

Responding in anger: she knocked her to the ground because the referee called her for coaching, a call rarely made in sports

Responding in anger: she knocked her to the ground because the referee called her for coaching, a call rarely made in sports

Responding in anger: she knocked her to the ground because the referee called her for coaching, a call rarely made in sports

The tennis game divided the world while people argued if any code violation – one for coaching, one for racket abuse and one for a game penalty – was justified based on the situation.

During the game, Serena said to umpire Carlos Ramos: & There are men here who are doing it a lot worse than me, but since I am a woman, are you taking this away from me? That is not good. & # 39;

Although Serena was confronted with her problems with how the chair referee treated her during the match, she was disappointed in her reaction to the situation.

& # 39; For me, as a perfectionist and as a professional, it would be impossible not to wish that I didn't treat many situations differently, even in that specific situation. So absolutely, & # 39; said Serena.

Her confession is because the match triggered a discussion about whether men and women were treated differently in tennis.

After the tennis match, ESPN carried out a study to see if it was true that men were treated with less weight when it came to breaking the rules than women.

In their research, the publication analyzed 200 sets that were played during the US Open.

Not happy: Serena defended her frustrations with the chair referee in an interview when she said that the call & # 39; never happened in the history of tennis & # 39 ;. But she regretted reacting in anger

Not happy: Serena defended her frustrations with the chair referee in an interview when she said that the call & # 39; never happened in the history of tennis & # 39 ;. But she regretted reacting in anger

Not happy: Serena defended her frustrations with the chair referee in an interview when she said that the call & # 39; never happened in the history of tennis & # 39 ;. But she regretted reacting in anger

Double standard: Why do I have to meet a standard other than the man? & # 39; Serena (pictured with Naomi) questioned during education how women are being judged more than men by their responses to situations

Double standard: Why do I have to meet a standard other than the man? & # 39; Serena (pictured with Naomi) questioned during education how women are being judged more than men by their responses to situations

Double standard: Why do I have to meet a standard other than the man? & # 39; Serena (pictured with Naomi) questioned during education how women are being judged more than men by their responses to situations

& # 39; In the 200 sets of tennis we analyzed, Williams was the only player to receive an official penalty, which is more eye-opening when you consider how much more coaching we saw in the men's games we watched, & # 39; wrote ESPN.

The publication found 20 coaching incidents for the men versus 8 coaching incidents for the women during the competitions. None of the men were punished and Serena, as everyone knows, was punished in particular.

Winning the King: It was Naomi's first Grand Slam victory last September when she defeated Serena

Winning the King: It was Naomi's first Grand Slam victory last September when she defeated Serena

Winning the King: It was Naomi's first Grand Slam victory last September when she defeated Serena

In addition to problems with the coaching call, Serena also referred to the problem with people who were upset by her anger during the match when they spoke with Business of Fashion.

She put forward a recent survey of women in the workplace with the words: & # 39; Many women said they felt they could control their emotions because they & # 39; were called too emotional or that they were called something else just because we face different challenges than men face.

& # 39; So I always think about that. Why do I have to face a different standard than the man? & # 39;

Serena is used to public control because she is particularly criticized for her reactions and the outfits she wears on the tennis court. But 23-time Grand Slam singles champions refuse to let their words influence her.

& # 39; It's part of life, you know, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; If someone is not scrutinizing you or talking about you, you are not doing something right. If everyone praises you and everything is perfect, then it's not the real world.

& # 39; People are going to examine you no matter what. They will find something wrong with you even if you do nothing wrong. And that doesn't let me influence anymore. I think I did that in the past. & # 39;