WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Senior Tory MP fears Boris Johnson has ‘lost his lead’ and has not fully recovered after the corona virus

Sir Paul's intervention came when the Boris Johnson government (shown today) is under increasing pressure over the pandemic

Sir Paul’s intervention came when the Boris Johnson government (shown today) is under increasing pressure over the pandemic

Boris Johnson has “ lost his lead ” and has not yet fully recovered from his personal battle with the corona virus, a leading Tory MP warned today.

When the prime minister was increasingly criticized for his approach to the pandemic, his mental acuity was questioned from his own party.

They expressed concern that in any other situation he would take it easy and return much slower to the strength of the work.

It was because a Nobel Prize-winning scientist tore Mr Johnson’s leadership, claiming it was not clear ‘who is in charge of the decisions.’

Sir Paul Nurse said Britain has been left on the ‘back foot’ with a lack of clear planning that has seen it ‘fired from successive crises’ in a devastating attack on the political establishment.

Priti Patel says ANYONE arriving in the UK will be self-quarantined for 14 days from June 8

Priti Patel confirmed today that all travelers returning to the UK from June 8 will undergo a 14-day mandatory quarantine period because she said Britain should now guard against importing cases of coronavirus.

Home Secretary said the UK should protect the “hard won progress” it has made in the fight against the deadly disease and that stringent border controls will help prevent a “devastating resurgence”.

Anyone entering the country from abroad should now provide an address and phone number to public health officials to determine where they will isolate themselves.

These officials then conduct random checks, finding that anyone who breaks the rules is faced with an initial fine of £ 1,000, with further non-compliance resulting in unlimited fines.

Any alien who refuses to comply with border measures may be refused entry. Ms Patel said that a “reckless minority” should not undermine the UK’s efforts to stop the spread of the disease.

Critics immediately demanded to know why border controls, which will be reviewed every three weeks, had not previously entered the crisis, as Ms Patel was accused of “acting too slowly”.

Sir Paul’s intervention came when the government was under increasing pressure over its approach to the pandemic. Bottlenecks include the death rate in nursing homes, a decision to end widespread tests early, and the slow rollout of a new test regimen.

Last night, Johnson was forced to reverse a widely unpopular decision to have foreign NHS and health personnel pay a supplement to access health care in the UK while working to save British life.

A senior Tory Member of Parliament told MailOnline, “Under normal circumstances, he probably would have taken it a bit easier. The man was nearly dead … pressure was put on him to come back. People usually don’t come back under the pressure he’s been under.

“He’s back in the line of fire and runs UK plc with 67 million people and all the problems out there.”

For most workers, colleagues would make sure that they “left the home by 5:20 PM and make sure he has his weekends off,” said the Tory.

“Boris has lost that lead. You could say Boris, we want you to take a very difficult turn, and he would use his common sense and get out.

“The disease may have had an impact. The spontaneity … I wonder if he’s mentally ill because he’s been seriously ill. ‘

The prime minister has also been increasingly scrutinized for a lack of public appearances, interviews and press conferences since returning to work following his hospitalization in the coronavirus.

He held only one of the daily press conferences at number 10 on May 11, with other ministers taking the lead, including Interior Minister Priti Patel tonight.

Sir Paul Nurse said Britain has been left on the 'back foot' with a lack of clear planning that has seen it 'fired from successive crises' in a devastating attack on the political establishment.

Sir Paul Nurse said Britain has been left on the 'back foot' with a lack of clear planning that has seen it 'fired from successive crises' in a devastating attack on the political establishment.

Sir Paul Nurse said Britain has been left on the ‘back foot’ with a lack of clear planning that has seen it ‘fired from successive crises’ in a devastating attack on the political establishment.

The geneticist, who won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine, criticized the Prime Minister (pictured last night) and told the BBC Today program, “I’m not entirely convinced that we are actually very clear in good leadership.”

Aside from his speech to the nation on May 10, his only other visible public appearances were two disappointing performances to the Prime Minister’s questions.

But this afternoon, he finally agreed to face MEPs’ questions next week with a performance in the Commons Liaison Committee.

The MP said they still thought the prime minister would get out of the situation, suggesting that every government would be under attack on this issue. “We’re on a sticky wicket. You don’t have to look too much under the surface to find things you criticize, “they said.

The future of ‘spoons: boss Tim Martin reveals plans to REOPEN 875 pubs

JD Wetherspoon today unveiled its £ 11million master plan to reopen the 875 pubs as soon as the government nods them in July – but while the blueprint promises social distance, no mention is made of the two-meter rule that experts say catering sector will decimate.

Drinkers are told to ‘not meet in large groups’ and are expected to disinfect their hands on arrival and at other times during their visit.

They will be following one-way systems to the toilets and through the bar where the checkouts are shielded to protect the staff likely to wear masks, gloves and eye protection, the chain said.

The staff will hand over any drinks that hold the base of the pint or wine glass and when ordered via a smartphone they will be delivered to a tray at the table for the customers to take for themselves the chance of spreading Covid-19 to reduce.

Families are asked to keep children seated and always to the toilet.

The 875 pubs in the UK and Ireland open during the usual hours from 8am to around 1am and encourage customers to order using the poster app telling them ‘there’s no need to visit the bar’.

However, people can pay in cash or with a card if necessary and should not move furniture

But they warned that Sir Keir Starmer had made progress in the Commons. ‘It goes well. We have to be careful. Keir is a smart guy. He can think, “said the Member of Parliament.

Sir Paul, the director of the renowned Francis Crick Institute, said the country was “increasingly catching up” and that scientists and politicians should define “a much clearer, publicly presented strategy” to deal with the pandemic.

The geneticist, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2001, told the BBC Today program: ‘I am not entirely convinced that we are actually very clear about having good leadership.

‘The question I keep asking myself is: do we have a good government system here that can combine preliminary knowledge, scientific knowledge with political action?

“And the question I constantly ask myself is: who is actually responsible for the decisions? Who develops the strategy and the operation and implementation of that strategy?

“Are they ministers? Is public health England? The National Health Service? The Office for Life Sciences, Sage (Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies)? I don’t know, but more importantly, do they know? ‘

Last night, another top scientist claimed that thousands of lives could have been saved from Covid-19 if the British blockade had been imposed just a week earlier.

Government scientific advisor Sir Ian Boyd, member of the number 10 SAGE panel, admitted “that it would have made quite a difference” if ministers had acted against the outbreak earlier.

Figures from the Department of Health show that 36,042 Britons died after a positive test for the coronavirus, which began to spread rapidly in the UK in March.

The government is expected today to unveil a new quarantine program that will isolate anyone entering the UK for 14 days.

And the so-called ‘certificates of immunity’ from the coronavirus that would allow the British to return to work have come a step closer after the ministers announced that mass antibody tests are underway.

NHS and health care providers will get the tests starting next week after Matt Hancock announced that the government has signed a contract for 10 million kits.

The screening will finally reveal who has experienced the disease and has emerged with some degree of resistance, a blind spot that has so far been a major blow to the UK’s response.

Asked about how to address the outbreak by the country on BBC Radio 4’s Today program, Sir Paul said, “I’m not sure we’re quite right.”

Sir Paul added: “Everyone involved, not just the politicians, the scientists and the doctors, we all make mistakes and we should try to learn from what mistakes have been made so far.

“I have a feeling that the UK has been too much in the background, catching up, firefighting through successive crises.”

He suggested that what was needed was to “get a much clearer, publicly presented strategy on what we are actually trying to do, and the evidence on which it is based.”

Sir Paul added, “And we don’t get that in communication. Maybe there is a strategy in there, I don’t see it. ‘

Detailed statistics show that in the UK more than 44,000 people have already died with COVID-19, but this study from the University of Southampton suggests the number could have been kept at 11,200 if lockdown had previously been introduced

Detailed statistics show that in the UK more than 44,000 people have already died with COVID-19, but this study from the University of Southampton suggests the number could have been kept at 11,200 if lockdown had previously been introduced

Detailed statistics show that in the UK more than 44,000 people have already died with COVID-19, but a study from the University of Southampton suggested the number could have been kept at 11,200 if lockdown had been previously introduced

When asked about the use of quarantine, Sir Paul suggested that more evidence was needed about the infectivity of people with coronavirus and how it was revealed by symptoms.

Australia urges it to be the first country to be exempted from UK’s new 14-day quarantine regulations, as arrivals face ‘home’ sampling

Australia is committed to being the first country to be exempted from the UK’s new 14-day coronavirus quarantine – as arrivals face ‘home samples’ and £ 1,000 fines for breaking the rules.

Ministers will reveal plans for compulsory isolation of everyone entering the country to prevent the deadly disease from flaring up again.

Those who ignore the orders will be fined £ 1,000followed by even more severe penalties for not paying.

Arrivals must provide an address where they will isolate themselves, imposed by public health officials who make random visits.

The exceptions to the strict regime will initially be very limited, especially for lorry drivers, NHS workers and fruit pickers who are considered essential to the economy and health services. Free movement with Ireland will also be maintained, with the Common Travel Area as an important part of the peace agreement.

The system is not expected to be completed until the Commons returns from the hiatus early next month. However, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has already raised the prospect of introducing “airlifts” to low-contamination countries at a later stage.

Reports in Australia suggest Prime Minister Scott Morrisson is pushing for his country, which has nearly eradicated the virus, to be left out of the sidewalks.

He said: “Since it has long been clear that people can be infected without symptoms and therefore be contagious to other people, yet we have not tested such people in hospitals and care homes.

“So we’ve made people, healthcare providers, who may be infected, have patients infect themselves, infect themselves, and have made hospitals potentially unsafe places.

“We need to see a changed strategy there that depends on the real evidence.”

He continued, “I don’t see any clarity in the public sphere about these kinds of arguments that need to be presented to the public so they feel safe when they go to the hospital.”

Sir Paul said there was “one more mistake” when the test strategy was implemented.

He said, “There were many labs across the country, smaller labs that could have increased testing capacity much faster than was possible with the major labs.”

Sir Paul said he did not feel that there should now be a formal inquiry into the UK’s response to the outbreak, but that it would require more “openness” in addition to “greater public domain debate.”

Northern Ireland minister Brandon Lewis said he “would disagree” with Sir Paul’s criticism, explaining that the government had followed “the best advice there is”.

He said, “I think this has seen us as a government have been very clear with people, very transparent with people.

“The prime minister himself has been very clear – the prime minister is ultimately responsible.

“We follow the best advice from the scientific advisors, our chief medical advisors and the teams there, but ultimately it is the ministers who make decisions.

“And I think this is one of the things we’ve seen during this process is our job of making sure we get as much information to people as we can to make sure people understand what we can do to play our part in keeping the R level down. ‘

Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis said he “would disagree” with Sir Paul’s criticism and explained that the government followed “the best advice there is”

Thousands of lives could have been saved if Britain imposed a WEEK earlier than March 23, says a government scientific advisor

Sir Ian Boyd, member of the number 10 SAGE panel, admitted 'it would have made a big difference' if ministers had previously acted to combat the outbreak

Sir Ian Boyd, member of the number 10 SAGE panel, admitted 'it would have made a big difference' if ministers had previously acted to combat the outbreak

Sir Ian Boyd, member of the number 10 SAGE panel, admitted ‘it would have made a big difference’ if ministers had previously acted to combat the outbreak

Thousands of lives could have been saved from Covid-19 if Britain’s blockade had been imposed just a week earlier, a government scientific advisor claims.

Sir Ian Boyd, member of the number 10 SAGE panel, admitted “that it would have made quite a difference” if ministers had previously acted to combat the outbreak.

Figures from the Department of Health show that 36,042 Britons died after a positive test for the coronavirus, which began to spread rapidly in the UK in March.

But it is feared that the actual number of Covid-19 victims is closer to 60,000, taking into account suspected and indirect deaths.

Sir Ian’s claim comes after an investigation this week that activating the British blockade would have saved tens of thousands of lives a week earlier.

The shock study suggested that enforcing strict rules to combat the coronavirus crisis on March 16 could have reduced the number of deaths to 11,200.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson locked the country on March 23, 60 days ago, and banned people from meeting or making unnecessary trips.

Britain was one of the last countries in Europe to introduce the rules – Germany, Belgium, France, Spain and Italy had done it days or weeks earlier.

WHEN DID OTHER COUNTRIES GO IN LOCKDOWN AND HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE BEEN IN THEM?

A report published in March by Imperial College’s COVID-19 response team outlined the dates when several countries in Europe began their lockdown measures.

Each is listed below, in addition to the COVID-19 death toll for each country, as of May 20.

The numbers alone do not suggest a direct link between the timing of the lockdown and the number of people who died, demonstrating that other factors play a role.

France, Germany, Italy and Spain are the most similar in size to the UK.

  • Austria: March 16; 633 killed
  • Belgium: March 18; 9,150 killed
  • Denmark: March 18; 561
  • France: March 17; 28,022
  • Germany: March 22; 8,193
  • Italy: March 11; 32,169
  • Norway: March 24; 233
  • Spain: March 14; 27,778
  • Sweden: no lockdown; 3,743
  • Switzerland: March 18; 1,883
  • United Kingdom: March 24; 35,341

Sir Ian, a professor of biology at the University of St. Andrews, told it The Coronavirus news broadcast: ‘Acting very early was very important.

“I would have loved to have acted a week or two weeks earlier and it would have made quite a difference to the steepness of the infection curve and thus to the mortality rate.

“And I think that’s really the main problem – could we have acted before? Were the plates there earlier? ‘

He said that the UK, like some of its European counterparts, was “slower” than countries that had fought SARS in the early 2000s.

SARS, caused by a different type of coronavirus, infected 8,000 people worldwide and killed 774 people in 2002.

Sir Ian added, “One could point the finger at ministers and politicians because they are unwilling to listen to scientific advice.

‘You can point the finger at scientists because they are actually not explicit enough. But ultimately all of these also interact with public opinion.

“And I think some politicians would have liked to have reacted earlier, but in their political opinion it probably wasn’t feasible because people might not have reacted to the way they eventually reacted.”

Membership in the closed SAGE committee that advised the government on coronavirus treatment was finally made public earlier this month.

A TIMELINE OF THE UK’S COVID-19 LOCKDOWN

February 28: According to the World Health Organization, the virus began to spread uncontrollably in Britain.

3 March: The government and the NHS have officially launched a campaign urging people to wash their hands more often.

12 March: Anyone who developed a fever or a new cough, regardless of whether they were tested for COVID-19, was told to isolate for two weeks.

March 16: Social distance begins:

  • The public was told to avoid contact with people outside the home, work from home where possible, and take only essential trips, such as to and from work or medical appointments.
  • Pubs and restaurants are not forced to close, but people are encouraged to avoid them.
  • Likewise, the government refused to ban large gatherings and sporting events, but said that police and ambulances would no longer be provided for them.

20th of March: Large companies had to close immediately, including gyms, recreation centers, pubs, cafes, restaurants, theaters and cinemas.

March 23: Full lockdown introduced:

  • In a speech to the nation, Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged everyone to stay home unless necessary, go shopping alone, go to medical appointments, or exercise once a day.
  • People’s gatherings were banned regardless of size, and people were forbidden to mix with others outside their household.
  • Everyone was instructed to work from home if possible. Many non-essential workers were forced to stop working if they couldn’t do it from home.
  • Schools closed their doors except for the children of essential workers.

March 24: All non-essential businesses, including clothing stores and hairdressers, had to close.

The names of those on the panel had not previously been published for reasons of security and independence.

But officials bowed to mounting pressure and announced the names of 50 experts in many areas who met regularly during the pandemic.

The names on the list include well-known figures involved in the daily press conferences, including chairman Sir Patrick Vallance.

It also included Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty and his deputies Dr. Jenny Harries and Professor Jonathan Van Tam.

Other attendees included epidemiologist Professor Neil Ferguson and Dr. Demis Hassabis, the director of Google’s DeepMind subsidiary.

Dr. John Dagpunar, from the University of Southampton, echoed Sir Ian’s claims in shock research published earlier this week.

He said in his paper, “Literally, delaying starting a lockdown every day could result in thousands of additional deaths.”

Dr. Dagpunar, an expert in mathematical sciences, added, “It does ask why lockdown never occurred before?”

He predicted how different scenarios could have affected the progress of the Covid-19 outbreak in Britain.

The start of the shutdown a week earlier on March 16 could have limited the death toll to 11,200, his analysis showed.

The study of Dr. Dagpunar took into account, among other things, the number of people infected with the virus, the reproduction speed, the hospital bed and the capacity of the staff, and the number of patients who died.

He calculated the mortality rate at one percent and the reproduction rate (R) before lockdown at 3.18, meaning that every 10 patients infected another 32.

The paper estimated that 4.4 percent of all patients require hospital treatment, 30 percent of whom end up in intensive care.

Hospitalization of intensive care patients lasts an average of 16 days and half dies.

Of the remaining 70 percent, a hospital stay is an average of eight days and 11 percent die.

The study suggested that a closure that started a week earlier - on March 16 - would have resulted in a total of 11,200 people who died and only two percent of the population contracted the virus (98 percent susceptibility)

The study suggested that a closure that started a week earlier - on March 16 - would have resulted in a total of 11,200 people who died and only two percent of the population contracted the virus (98 percent susceptibility)

The study suggested that a closure that started a week earlier – on March 16 – would have resulted in a total of 11,200 people who died and only two percent of the population contracted the virus (98 percent susceptibility)

A second model, which best reflects what is currently happening in the UK, suggests that six percent of the population becomes infected and that approximately 39,000 people die. Demand for hospital beds is considerably higher than in the previous estimate. Britain is known to have more than 44,000 deaths already, so this estimate is still too low

A second model, which best reflects what is currently happening in the UK, suggests that six percent of the population becomes infected and that approximately 39,000 people die. Demand for hospital beds is considerably higher than in the previous estimate. Britain is known to have more than 44,000 deaths already, so this estimate is still too low

A second model, which best reflects what is currently happening in the UK, suggests that six percent of the population becomes infected and that approximately 39,000 people die. Demand for hospital beds is considerably higher than in the previous estimate. Britain is known to have more than 44,000 deaths already, so this estimate is still too low

The study suggests that an earlier shutdown would have led to smaller spikes in deaths and demand for hospital beds

The study suggests that an earlier shutdown would have led to smaller spikes in deaths and demand for hospital beds

The study suggests that an earlier shutdown would have led to smaller spikes in deaths and demand for hospital beds

The research of Dr. Dagpunar showed a sharper, higher spike in deaths and demand for hospital beds in the current UK situation, with closure closing on March 23. The total death toll for this model (39,000) has already been exceeded, however

The research of Dr. Dagpunar showed a sharper, higher spike in deaths and demand for hospital beds in the current UK situation, with closure closing on March 23. The total death toll for this model (39,000) has already been exceeded, however

The research of Dr. Dagpunar showed a sharper, higher spike in deaths and demand for hospital beds in the current UK situation, with closure closing on March 23. The total death toll for this model (39,000) has already been exceeded, however

Imperial College's COVID-19 Response Team, which advised the government, estimated in March that the global mean R0 of the coronavirus was 3.87. As social distance and locking took effect, that number has now dropped below 1, possibly as low as 0.5, meaning the virus will die out naturally if it continues

Imperial College's COVID-19 Response Team, which advised the government, estimated in March that the global mean R0 of the coronavirus was 3.87. As social distance and locking took effect, that number has now dropped below 1, possibly as low as 0.5, meaning the virus will die out naturally if it continues

Imperial College’s COVID-19 Response Team, which advised the government, estimated in March that the global mean R0 of the coronavirus was 3.87. As social distance and locking took effect, that number has now dropped below 1, possibly as low as 0.5, meaning the virus will die out naturally if it continues

Experts suggested the UK's coronavirus 'disappeared', with fewer deaths and new cases in London under 50 a day

Experts suggested the UK's coronavirus 'disappeared', with fewer deaths and new cases in London under 50 a day

Experts suggested the UK’s coronavirus ‘disappeared’, with fewer deaths and new cases in London under 50 a day

BUSINESS CHIEFS AND MPS CALL FOR A QUICK LOCKDOWN EXIT

Business leaders and politicians begged the government last night to unlock the economy and get Britain moving after figures showed that the Covid-19 outbreak came under control.

Experts suggested that the UK’s coronavirus “disappeared,” with fewer deaths and new cases in London below 50 a day.

Official figures on Thursday revealed how deaths, hospitalizations and new infections have fallen significantly since the epidemic peaked in early April.

The R rate – which shows how fast the virus is spreading – would also drop.

Professor Carl Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine at Oxford University, said the coronavirus was “disappearing at a faster rate” and urged politicians to “open up businesses” to prevent second wave of deaths from economic collapse. .

Conservative ex-leader Iain Duncan Smith said, “We have to be quick. The threat we are facing now, more serious than the corona virus, is that of a failing economy. ‘

Tory ex-minister John Redwood said, “We will have unemployment on a scale that has not been seen for many years … unless we get people on leave back to work.”

Dr. Dagpunar, who suggested these factors using an algorithm based on the timing of the British outbreak, suggested that the March 23 shutdown could have caused about 39,000 deaths in total.

Britain is known to have already passed this grim milestone number, suggesting the study’s estimate of death rate, virus R rate, or some other factor is too low.

If the blockade had started a week earlier, on March 16, the model suggested that there could have been a “ very large reduction ” in the number of deaths, with a limitation to about 11,200.

The virus would have infected four percent less of the population in this scenario (two percent compared to six percent), the study said, and demand for hospital beds would have been lower.

Dr. Dagpunar said, “In hindsight [this] clearly illustrates that previous action was needed and would have saved many lives. ‘

“Literally, delaying suppression every day can lead to thousands more deaths.

The same goes for premature relaxation, where it is recognized that the rate of decline is less than the growth rate, so the effect, while serious, is not as strong.

“These conclusions are the irrefutable consequence of the exponential growth and decline of a managed epidemic.”

The article by Dr. Dagpunar was published on the website medRxiv without being checked by other scientists or journal editors.

Uit peilingen van Britten blijkt dat ongeveer twee derde van de mensen denkt dat de regering er te lang over heeft gedaan om het Verenigd Koninkrijk op slot te doen.

Maar andere deskundigen zeggen dat de ministers het bewijs ‘uit het oog hebben verloren’ en zich haastten met de afsluiting, waarbij ze Zweden prees omdat het zijn lef vasthield en de economie niet stopzette.

Surveillanceonderzoek heeft aangetoond dat het cruciale R-percentage al begon te dalen voordat de draconische maatregelen werden ingevoerd.

En andere gegevens suggereerden dat de overdracht een hoogtepunt had bereikt nadat de zachtere sociale afstandsmaatregelen om de uitbraak te beteugelen op 16 maart werden uitgerold.

.

Comments
Loading...