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Senior politician says it would be awkward if he needed to take his trousers off in press conference

Weird moment a senior politician says it would be awkward if he had to take off his pants in the middle of a press conference

  • Michael McCormack joked about having to take his pants off during the press
  • The former deputy prime minister was attacked by a ‘rogue’ bull ant on Monday
  • He said the election results would have been closer if he were the leader of the National Party.

A senior politician has joked about taking off his pants in the middle of a press conference after being attacked by a ‘rogue’ bull ant.

Former Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack was speaking to reporters in Wagga Wagga, in his Riverina constituency, on Monday when the incident unfolded.

A staff member at Mr. McCormack’s side noticed the large ant and began earnestly petting the politician’s shoulders before the insect traveled south.

“Sorry, Michael, you have a rogue bull ant,” says the man. ‘He’s gone for your…’

Senior politician says it would be awkward if he needed

“If I have to take my pants off in the middle of this news conference, it’s going to be awkward,” McCormack told reporters Monday.

“If I have to take my pants off in the middle of this press conference, it will be awkward,” the MP replied with a laugh.

But it worked for Peter Malinauskas. He took off his shirt and won the post of Prime Minister of South Australia. A rogue bull ant. What could be worse?

McCormack was referring to a viral video of the 41-year-old man seen shirtless holding his daughter Eliza in a kiddie pool in February.

The video quickly had tongues wagging with then-Prime Minister Steven Marshall joking that he would cut carbs out of his diet after watching the video.

The Riverina member told reporters Monday that he believed the federal election results would have been closer had he been leader of the National Party.

Mr McCormack referenced now-viral images of the 41-year-old man seen shirtless while holding his daughter Eliza in a kiddie pool in February (pictured)

Mr McCormack referenced now-viral images of the 41-year-old man seen shirtless while holding his daughter Eliza in a kiddie pool in February (pictured)

The Riverina member (pictured with his wife Catherine in 2019) said he believed the federal election results would have been closer if he were the leader of the National Party.

The Riverina member (pictured with his wife Catherine in 2019) said he believed the federal election results would have been closer if he were the leader of the National Party.

McCormack lost his leadership to Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce last year and has not ruled out challenging him for the job.

There shouldn’t have been a change in leadership of the National Party in June last year, there simply shouldn’t have been,” he told reporters on Monday.

“In the last election, all the Nationals went back to their seats, and we had a couple of transition seats with incumbents retiring and new members coming in, and the votes were much higher last time than this time.”

While the number of Liberal seats has been greatly diminished by the Independents and the Greens in the Lower House, the Nationals have retained all of their seats.

McCormack cited Joyce’s stance on climate policy as a factor behind the Coalition’s loss of seats in this election, but said he would focus on his role in Riverina.

It comes as Labor remains on track to secure the minimum number of seats needed to form a majority government.

Mr. McCormack (pictured during Question Time in May 2021) cited Mr. Joyce's stance on climate policy as a factor behind the Coalition's loss of seats in this federal election.

Mr. McCormack (pictured during Question Time in May 2021) cited Mr. Joyce’s stance on climate policy as a factor behind the Coalition’s loss of seats in this federal election.

Numbers tallied by the Australian Electoral Commission show Labor currently leading with 76 seats. But some, including Gilmore’s headquarters on the south coast of New South Wales, are too close to call.

On Monday morning, senior Labor figures were not ready to claim a majority government victory but said there was a “strong and credible path” towards it.

‘We are hoping for a majority government, but there are more votes to count. Thats the reality. We have a few more days to go,” newly sworn-in Finance Minister Katy Gallagher told ABC News Breakfast on Monday.

The latest figures from the Australian Electoral Commission have Labor ahead with 76 seats and the coalition with 58 MPs.

Mail-in votes will continue to be received and counted until June 3, and written votes will be returned on or before June 28.

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