Home Life Style Senegalese father who lives in Cardiff with his conjoined twin girls, who share one pair of legs and several organs, says it’s a ‘huge privilege’ to raise them after being told they wouldn’t survive for more than a few days

Senegalese father who lives in Cardiff with his conjoined twin girls, who share one pair of legs and several organs, says it’s a ‘huge privilege’ to raise them after being told they wouldn’t survive for more than a few days

by Merry
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A father of conjoined twin girls has opened up emotionally about the

A father of conjoined twin girls has opened up emotionally about the “enormous privilege and blessing” of witnessing a “constant battle for life” every day in his inspiring seven-year-old daughters.

Ibrahima Ndiaye spoke candidly about being a father to Marieme and Ndeye, whom he brought to the UK from Senegal in 2017 when they were seven months old, to seek help from doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London.

Twins have separate brains, hearts and lungs, but they share a liver, bladder, digestive system and three kidneys. Doctors had predicted that they would not survive more than a few days after their birth.

Speaking to the new BBC documentary Inseparable Sisters, she enjoyed the joy of her children defying all odds as the girls were filmed celebrating their seventh birthday, and told the program about the challenges her family has faced.

“Having conjoined twins as a parent, you have something you didn’t expect,” he said.

A father of conjoined twin girls has opened up emotionally about the “enormous privilege and blessing” of witnessing a “constant battle for life” every day in his inspiring seven-year-old daughters.

‘Something you never imagined. I don’t pretend it’s easy. It is not. But it is a great privilege, a great blessing.

“You feel lucky to witness this constant battle for life.”

Ibrahima admitted that he was surprised when hospital staff told him that he was going to be the father of conjoined twins, as he had only been expecting one baby.

‘I read about conjoined twins. But it’s only for other people. Not for you. This is not going to happen to you,’ she said. “You are completely knocked down.”

Her world was thrown into orbit when she was told her new babies probably wouldn’t survive more than a few days.

“I was preparing to lose them very quickly,” he revealed. ‘The only thing we can do is simply be by their side and not let them walk this journey alone.

‘Two weeks passed, four weeks passed. We started to build hope and then we could see very clearly that we were going to be dealing with warriors. They clung to life.

Marieme and Ndeye were born in Senegal in 2016, where doctors believed their best chance for survival was separation.

Ibrahima Ndiaye spoke candidly about being a father to Marieme and Ndeye, whom he brought to the UK from Senegal in 2017 when they were seven months old, to seek help from doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London.

Ibrahima Ndiaye spoke candidly about being a father to Marieme and Ndeye, whom he brought to the UK from Senegal in 2017 when they were seven months old, to seek help from doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London.

Ibrahima Ndiaye spoke candidly about being a father to Marieme and Ndeye, whom he brought to the UK from Senegal in 2017 when they were seven months old, to seek help from doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London.

Speaking to the new BBC documentary, Inseparable Sisters, she enjoyed the joy of her children defying all odds as the girls were filmed celebrating their seventh birthday, and told the program about the challenges her family has faced.

Speaking to the new BBC documentary, Inseparable Sisters, she enjoyed the joy of her children defying all odds as the girls were filmed celebrating their seventh birthday, and told the program about the challenges her family has faced.

Speaking to the new BBC documentary, Inseparable Sisters, she enjoyed the joy of her children defying all odds as the girls were filmed celebrating their seventh birthday, and told the program about the challenges her family has faced.

The family contacted hospitals around the world, including Belgium, Germany, Zimbabwe, Norway, Sweden and the United States, “begging” for help before opting to take the twins to London.

Ibrahima hoped that doctors at London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital would be able to separate the girls and that they would be able to return to their brothers and sisters in Senegal.

But tests determined Marieme’s heart was too weak for surgery and doctors predicted she would not survive the operation.

Hospital officials helped Ibrahima deliberate the options and it was ultimately decided not to separate the girls.

Speaking about the impossible situation he found himself in, the father said: “At this point, it’s just killing one of my children for another. It’s just something I can’t do. I can’t afford to choose who will live and who will die.

‘I never expected one. So I had one, two three. This shows that whatever the complexity of your task, you can achieve it.’

Hospital officials helped Ibrahima deliberate the options and it was ultimately decided not to separate the girls.

Hospital officials helped Ibrahima deliberate the options and it was ultimately decided not to separate the girls.

Hospital officials helped Ibrahima deliberate the options and it was ultimately decided not to separate the girls.

Ibrahima and her daughters have been granted discretionary leave to remain in the UK so they can continue receiving medical treatment in Britain. They now live in Cardiff.

The twins’ mother returned to Senegal and takes care of her siblings.

Their father revealed on the show that he has taken on his “parental responsibility” to ensure the girls “have someone who is here to help them.”

“When they tell you from the beginning that there is no future, you live in the present,” he added. “I am completely immersed in this journey.”

In an emotional end to the programme, Ibrahima gratefully addressed the hospital and school staff who have supported him and his daughters on their journey.

“You have been fighting for these girls, I witness it every day,” she said.

In an emotional finale to the programme, Ibrahima gratefully addressed the hospital and school staff who have supported him and his daughters on their journey.

In an emotional finale to the programme, Ibrahima gratefully addressed the hospital and school staff who have supported him and his daughters on their journey.

In an emotional finale to the programme, Ibrahima gratefully addressed the hospital and school staff who have supported him and his daughters on their journey.

‘You are making my life easier at every moment… Thank you very much for everything.’

He also told the documentary that he and his daughters are “lucky to be part of this community” and “couldn’t hope for better.”

“This shows how resilient they are,” he added. They have achieved things that no one ever thought they would achieve and they are proving everyone wrong.

‘Where it comes from, I don’t know… They are giving me such joy that I would never find it anywhere.

“It’s a great blessing to be his father.”

Ibrahima concluded by urging parents who may find themselves in a similar situation to him to “never give up” and to “celebrate life.”

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