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Senate committee to meet this week to discuss $4.5 BILLION in support for Taiwan

Senate committee meets this week to discuss $4.5 BILLION in support of Taiwan’s defense against China… as Ukraine’s fund rises above $15 billion despite US financial crisis

  • Sens. Bob Menendez, DN.J., and Lindsey Graham, RC, first introduced the Taiwan Policy Act in June
  • Bill allows $4.5 billion in security aid to be sent to island democracy as it fights an increasingly aggressive China
  • Such billions in foreign aid would come after US funding for Ukraine’s fight against Russia exceeded $15 billion
  • The bill also calls for the conclusion of a bilateral free trade agreement with Taiwan and the formal recognition of the Taiwanese government
  • It would recognize Taiwan as a key non-NATO ally – a designation that would accelerate arms sales, but is not a full defense pact

With the Senate back to work after the August recess, the Foreign Relations Committee will consider a bipartisan financing bill for Taiwan’s defense this week.

Sens. Bob Menendez, DN.J., and Lindsey Graham, RC, first introduced the Taiwan Policy Act in June. The bill makes it possible to send $4.5 billion in security aid to island democracy as it fights an increasingly aggressive China that has promised to “reunite” it with the mainland.

The committee will meet on Wednesday to review the bill.

Such billions in foreign aid would come after US funding for Ukraine’s fight against Russia surpassed $15 billion, despite reports that the funding is untraceable.

The bill also calls for the conclusion of a bilateral free trade agreement with Taiwan and the formal recognition of the Taiwanese government as “the legitimate representative of the Taiwanese people.” It would recognize Taiwan as a key non-NATO ally — a designation that would accelerate arms sales, but is not a full-blown defense pact.

Washington has long pursued a policy of strategic ambiguity in the region, refusing to say whether it would come to Taiwan’s aid if Beijing launched an invasion. It has refused to even call Taiwan a ‘nation’, reaffirming its support for the One China policy. Formal recognition of the Taiwanese government could be seen as a violation of the long-standing One China policy.

sen.  Lindsey Graham, RS.C.

sen.  Bob Menendez, DN.J.

Sens. Bob Menendez, DN.J., and Lindsey Graham, RC, first introduced the Taiwan Policy Act in June

The bill allows $4.5 billion in security aid to be sent to the island's democracy as it fights an increasingly aggressive China that has promised to

The bill allows $4.5 billion in security aid to be sent to the island’s democracy as it fights an increasingly aggressive China that has promised to “reunite” it with the mainland

“When it comes to Taiwan, our answer should be that we are for democracy and against communist aggression,” Graham said in June. ‘We live in dangerous times. China measures America and our commitment to Taiwan. The danger will only increase if we show weakness to Chinese threats and aggression towards Taiwan. I am hopeful that we will have strong bipartisan support for our legislation and that the Biden administration will support itself.”

However, the Biden administration was not quite on board as of August.

“The White House is very concerned. I have great concerns,” Senator Chris Murphy, D-Conn., told Bloomberg. Murphy, a member of the foreign relations committee, said that while it “makes sense for us to move closer to Taiwan,” he said he’s “not sure now is the time to throw 40 years of policy away.”

China, meanwhile, has grown increasingly enraged as an influx of US lawmakers made trips to Taiwan, starting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her Democratic delegation in July.

Chinese aircraft to conduct combat exercises around Taiwan in August

Chinese aircraft to conduct combat exercises around Taiwan in August

In this photo from China's Xinhua News Agency, a member of the People's Liberation Army looks through binoculars during military exercises as the Taiwanese frigate Lan Yang is seen from the rear on Friday, August 5, 2022.

In this photo from China’s Xinhua News Agency, a member of the People’s Liberation Army looks through binoculars during military exercises as the Taiwanese frigate Lan Yang is seen from the rear on Friday, August 5, 2022.

Recently, a bipartisan congressional delegation, Florida Democratic Representative Stephanie Murphy, concluded its trip on Friday after meeting President Tsai Ing-wen and other senior Taiwanese leaders. They were the sixth group of lawmakers to visit the island in recent days, starting with Pelosi’s delegation.

On September 1, the State Department announced a $1.1 billion arms deal with Taiwan for a package that includes 60 Harpoon anti-ship missiles and 100 Sidewinder tactical air missiles.

China warned of “countermeasures” if the sale goes through, saying it “seriously endangers US-China relations.”

China launched its first-ever military exercises in the Taiwan Straight last month, following Pelosi’s visit, past the median line, which both sides have respected for decades as an unofficial barrier.

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