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The Senate has unanimously adopted a bill that turns animal abuse into a federal crime and will be sent to Donald Trump to sign up

The Senate has unanimously adopted a bill that turns animal abuse into a federal crime and will be sent to Donald Trump to sign into law.

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The Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture (PACT) Act, which criminalises certain acts of animal abuse, was passed by the House last month and extends a 2010 law.

The bipartisan bill will now be sent to Donald Trump's office for his signature, and if he signs it, it will become federal law.

The Senate has unanimously adopted a bill that turns animal abuse into a federal crime and will be sent to Donald Trump to sign up

The Senate has unanimously adopted a bill that turns animal abuse into a federal crime and will be sent to Donald Trump to sign up

Republican Senator Pat Toomey

Republican Senator Pat Toomey

Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal

Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal

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Republican Senator Pat Toomey, (left), from Pennsylvania, carried the bill along with Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal, (right), from Connecticut

Republican Senator Pat Toomey, from Pennsylvania, has co-sponsored the bill along with Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal from Connecticut.

Toomey said: “Adopting this legislation is a big win in the attempt to stop animal abuse and make our communities safer.

& # 39; There is evidence that the disturbed individuals who harm animals often commit violence against humans. It is appropriate that the federal government has strong animal cruelty laws and penalties. & # 39;

Blumenthal also claimed: & # 39; There is no place in a civilized society for mutilating and torturing animals – period.

& # 39; Senator Toomey and I have worked for years to hold the barbaric people who commit these crimes responsible, and I am happy that Congress is finally sending our bill to the president's office to be signed. & # 39 ;

A person can be prosecuted for crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating and impaling animals and sexually exploiting them under the PACT law.

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The convicted would face federal crimes, fines and up to seven years in prison.

Around 50 states currently have laws on their statute books against animal cruelty at state level.

Senator Pat Toomey (left) said there is evidence that the disturbed individuals who harm animals often commit violence against people

Senator Pat Toomey (left) said there is evidence that the disturbed individuals who harm animals often commit violence against people

Senator Pat Toomey (left) said there is evidence that the disturbed individuals who harm animals often commit violence against people

The bill was introduced to the House by Democrat Ted Deutch (left) and Republican Vern Buchanan (right) and was passed on October 22.

The bill was submitted to the House by Democrat Ted Deutch (left) and Republican Vern Buchanan (right) and was passed on October 22.

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The bill was submitted to the House by Democrat Ted Deutch (left) and Republican Vern Buchanan (right) and was passed on October 22.

Authorities could prosecute offenders because they will have federal jurisdiction and not be bound by state laws. They could also prosecute criminals if cruelty is committed on federal property.

The announcement was welcomed by Kitty Block, the director of the Humane Society, and Sara Amundson, president of the organization's legislative fund.

In a joint statement, they said: “The adoption of this bill is a well-deserved victory for us and our colleagues from the Animal Dispute Resolution Division of the Humane Society of the United States, who were helpful in helping the sponsors in drafting this legislation and have led the struggle to adopt the PACT Act for almost a decade now.

& # 39; The bill is a no-brainer for most Americans and this is the third time the entire Senate has voted in favor. & # 39;

The move was also welcomed by Sarah Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund (photo)
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The move was also welcomed by Sarah Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund (photo)

The move was also welcomed by Sarah Amundson, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund (photo)

The PACT Act that makes certain malicious animal atrocities within federal jurisdiction, including crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating and suffocating live animals, and sexual exploitation of them, a federal crime.

The bill was introduced to the House by Democrat Ted Deutch and Republican Vern Buchanan and was passed on October 22.

Buchanan said at the time that he was hopeful that the bill could be adopted.

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& # 39; This is a milestone that establishes a federal crime against malicious torture of animals for the first time.

He added: & # 39; We are optimistic that it will pass the Senate, which has already supported the bill in two previous sessions of Congress. & # 39;

The legislation would build on a measure signed by President Barack Obama that prohibits videos in which animals are burned, drowned, suffocated, impaled or tortured in other ways.

Animal welfare campaigners had claimed the law as it used to be, and did not focus on the cruelty that occurred in much of the content published online.

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