sen. Graham Claims Members of His FAMILY Are Not Working Because of Bidenden’s $300 Unemployment Benefits

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Lindsey Graham revealed on Tuesday that members of his family have not returned to work due to Joe Biden’s $300-a-week boost — after half of US states canceled payments.

“There are a lot of jobs that will not be filled and will never be filled until you change the benefit structure,” Graham said during an interview with acting director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Shalanda Young at a budget committee hearing on Tuesday. .

“Does that logic make sense to you, given where we stand in our economy?”

“I understand the logic, but I haven’t met any Americans who would rather not work either,” Young insisted.

It was then that Graham suggested that members of his own family don’t like to work by saying, ‘I have a lot of people in my family who don’t work because they get — I’ll show you some of my family.’

Senator Lindsey Graham suggested his family would rather collect unemployment than work as he revealed on Tuesday that his relatives are not working because they get more benefits

Senator Lindsey Graham suggested his family would rather collect unemployment than work as he revealed on Tuesday that his relatives are not working because they get more benefits

The comment came during an interrogation at a hearing with OMB Acting Director Shalanada Young, who claimed: 'I also haven't met any Americans who would rather not work'

The comment came during an interrogation at a hearing with OMB Acting Director Shalanada Young, who claimed: ‘I also haven’t met any Americans who would rather not work’

The comments come as 25 of the 27 Republican-led states have announced they are opting out of Biden's $300-a-week unemployment benefit.

The comments come as 25 of the 27 Republican-led states have announced they are opting out of Biden’s $300-a-week unemployment benefit.

In March 2019, the average weekly payment to an unemployed person was $348 when combining federal and state payments.  That nearly tripled to $938 in March 2020. Now they're at $638 a week -- $300 more than before the pandemic.  Someone who worked 40 hours a week in 2019 now gets nearly $16 an hour for doing nothing at home, which is more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25

In March 2019, the average weekly payment to an unemployed person was $348 when combining federal and state payments. That nearly tripled to $938 in March 2020. Now they’re $638 a week — $300 more than before the pandemic. Someone who worked 40 hours a week in 2019 now gets nearly $16 an hour for doing nothing at home, which is more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25

APRIL 2021 UNEMPLOYMENT IN STATES FALLS INCREASED BENEFITS

ALABAMA

Unemployed residents: 79,332

Unemployment rate: 3.6%

ALASKA

Unemployed residents: 23,629

Percentage of unemployed: 6.7%

ARIZONA

Unemployed residents: 239,495

Percentage of unemployed: 6.7%

ARKANSAS

Unemployed residents: 59,389

Percentage of unemployed: 4.4%

FLORIDA

Unemployed residents: 487,388

Unemployment rate: 4.8%

GEORGIA

Unemployed residents: 221,140

Percentage of unemployed: 4.3%

IDAHO

Unemployed residents: 28,156

Percentage of unemployed: 3.1%

INDIANA

Unemployed residents: 131,101

Unemployment rate: 3.9%

IOWA

Unemployed residents: 61,648

Unemployment rate: 3.8%

MARYLAND

Unemployed residents: 193,122

Unemployment rate: 6.2%

MISSISSIPPI

Unemployed residents: 80,270

Unemployment rate: 6.3%

MISSOURIA

Unemployed residents: 126,758

Percentage of unemployed: 4.1%

MONTANA

Unemployed residents: 19,978

Unemployment rate: 3.8%

NEBRASKA

Unemployed residents: 28,415

Percentage of unemployed: 2.8%

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Unemployed residents: 21,410

Percentage of unemployed: 2.8%

NORTH DAKOTA

Unemployed residents: 16,838

Percentage of unemployed: 4.2%

OHIO

Unemployed residents: 272,516

Percentage of unemployed: 4.7%

OKLAHOMA

Unemployed residents: 79,583

Percentage of unemployed: 4.3%

SOUTH CAROLINA

Unemployed residents: 120,783

Unemployment rate: 5.1%

SOUTH DAKOTA

Unemployed residents: 13,062

Percentage of unemployed: 2.8%

TENNESSEE

Unemployed residents: 166,704

Unemployed percentage: 5%

TEXAS

Unemployed residents: 943,503

Percentage of unemployed: 6.7%

UTAH

Unemployed residents: 45,094

Percentage of unemployed: 2.8%

WEST VIRGINIA

Unemployed residents: 45,793

Percentage of unemployed: 5.8%

WYOMING

Unemployed residents: 15,747

Unemployment rate: 5.3%

*The national unemployment rate in April 2021 was 6.1%

“The bottom line is I think there are people, they’re not bad people, but they’re not going to work for $15 an hour and put $23 out of work,” he continued.

“That doesn’t make you a bad person. If you work for $15 an hour, you’re almost an asshole.’

Graham, 65, has never been married and has no children. By the time he was 22, both of Graham’s parents had died, but he does have a sister who is about nine years his junior.

It is unclear which family members the senator is referring to.

Expert analysis revealed last month that the average unemployed American who receives state and federal benefits amid the pandemic is able to collect more unemployment than they would if they wanted to return to work.

People who made $32,000 before the pandemic now earn more on benefits. The median US salary for a person in 2019 was $31,133.

Labor shortages in the US and the high demand for jobs to be filled are worrying economists, who say it will lead to a huge rise in inflation as the economy continues to be stimulated with money raised by the federal government. pumped out.

Biden’s $1.9 trillion US bailout plan extended federal unemployment benefits of $300 a week until September.

Since then, 25 of the 27 states with Republican governors have said they will end that increased benefit this summer.

Graham noted during his questioning with Young that states, including South Carolina, have begun to end the increased unemployment benefits.

“A number of states are in fact canceling federal unemployment benefits for their state because they believe it will hinder the ability to re-employ people as the economy bounced back from the COVID pandemic,” Graham said.

Earlier in his interrogation, he told Young, “The reason I don’t want to beat you up over the budget is because I like you.”

However, he demanded that the process be twofold, as he nearly assured Republicans would reject the $6 trillion budget submitted by the Biden administration.

The states waiving the additional payments are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming.

The only two GOP governors standing are Charlie Baker of Massachusetts and Phil Scott of Vermont.

“I think we’re urging people not to work because they’re just making more money,” Graham said at Tuesday’s hearing. “I don’t blame them, I blame us.”

Biden defended the program in comments at the White House in May, where he claimed he “doesn’t see much evidence” that the rise in unemployment has stopped people from taking jobs, adding that “Americans want to work.”

Democrats attempted to increase weekly unemployment benefits to $400 a week in the US bailout, signed by Biden in mid-March. To gain more support — especially from moderate Democrats like West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin — the increased benefits stayed at $300.

All 25 states that waive the increased federal government unemployment benefits will still have state-level unemployment benefits that will be available to those who remain unemployed.

Last month, a report from the Department of Labor showed the country added a staggering 266,000 jobs in April, fueling GOP claims that the benefits are keeping people at home rather than at work.

Despite dismal job growth, governors assure there is a surplus of open positions in their respective states.

Some states have also reinstated pre-pandemic policies that require people coping with unemployment to prove they are actively looking for work.

States that voted for Biden in 2020 lost people in the workforce at a disproportionately higher percentage than red states. Many of these states also have the highest combined unemployment benefits when taking into account last year’s state and federal benefits.

Massachusetts has the highest unemployment benefits with a maximum of $855 per week. The unemployment rate in the northeastern state was 7.1 percent in April, higher than the national average of 6 percent.

The average weekly payment to an unemployed person in March 2019 was $348 when combining federal and state payments. That number nearly tripled to $938 in March 2020, when the pandemic hit the US for the first time — resulting in a record number of unemployed Americans.

That average payout was still $638 a week in May, which is $300 more than before, meaning someone who worked 40 hours a week before the pandemic is now getting close to $16 an hour doing nothing at home, which is more is than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25.

In eight states, unemployed Americans can earn at least $600 a week in benefits.  Massachusetts offers the most generous benefits.  The White House denied that these benefits are the cause of the record low job numbers and disappointing growth in April

In eight states, unemployed Americans can earn at least $600 a week in benefits. Massachusetts offers the most generous benefits. The White House denied that these benefits are the cause of the record low job numbers and disappointing growth in April

In April, just 266,000 people joined the workforce — a quarter of the 1 million forecast.  The loss stunned experts and many concluded that there is not enough reason to go back

In April, just 266,000 people joined the workforce — a quarter of the 1 million forecast. The loss stunned experts and many concluded that there is not enough reason to go back

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