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Self-flying planes are on a path for takeoff with Boeing and Airbus testing autonomous systems

Self-flying planes are getting ready for takeoff as Boeing, Airbus and other companies are testing autonomous systems and craft — but pilots are pushing back on safety concerns.

The technologies enable autonomous landings, can handle inflight emergencies and relax the Federal Aviation Administration law requiring two pilots in the cockpit.

Pilots have shared their concerns on Twitter, with many stating that two pilots are needed in an emergency.

Tony Driza, who has been an airline pilot for 40 years, posted that he can “unequivocally state that when an emergency occurs in the cockpit, it takes a full crew to deal with it.”

While autonomous aircraft are still early days, Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun said in a Bloomberg TV interview, the technology will “eventually come to all aircraft.”

Boeing has developed an autonomous tanker aircraft for the US Navy, the MQ-25. The company sees the technology making its way into every aircraft

Boeing is moving towards an autonomous world and is working on systems for military purposes that will find their way into commercial flights.

The company delivered the technology to the US Navy with the MQ-25, an autonomous refueling aircraft that extends the combat range of deployed Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet, Boeing EA-18G Growler and Lockheed Martin F-35C fighters.

“I believe autonomy and team building will be one of the real drivers in aircraft development,” said Calhoun. Air and Space Forces.

Boeing’s rival Airbus is testing its DargonFly systems for commercial aircraft, which will provide automated landing technology and pilot assistance.

The technology’s vision is said to work faster than a human’s, allowing it to spot incoming obstacles more quickly.

DragonFly is also designed to provide a solution for safe flight and landing.

If the crew is unable to control the aircraft, the onboard function detects the problem and automatically selects the most appropriate airport to divert the aircraft.

DragonFly protest chief Isabelle Lacaze said in a rack“Just as dragonflies can recognize landmarks that help them define boundaries, our demonstrator is equipped with advanced sensing technology and software capable of managing in-flight and landing operations.”

Pilots Have Shared Their Concerns On Twitter, With Many Stating That Two Pilots Are Needed In An Emergency

Pilots have shared their concerns on Twitter, with many stating that two pilots are needed in an emergency

Boeing'S Rival Airbus Is Testing Its Dargonfly Systems For Commercial Aircraft, Which Will Provide Automated Landing Technology And Pilot Assistance.  The System Includes Cameras And Sensors That Sit On The Nose Of The Aircraft

Boeing’s rival Airbus is testing its DargonFly systems for commercial aircraft, which will provide automated landing technology and pilot assistance. The system includes cameras and sensors that sit on the nose of the aircraft

“The DragonFly demonstrator has been made possible through collaboration within the Airbus technical community and with our trusted third-party partners, and we look forward to the insights this final phase of testing will yield.”

A California startup, Xwing, is also looking to enter the autonomous aircraft race with its fully functional self-driving cargo plane.

While the name takes inspiration from Star Wars, the company aims to revolutionize the way goods are shipped.

The Xwing uses modified Cessna Grand Caravans aircraft that are completely autonomous from gate to gate.

In 2021, Xwing completed its first demonstration, with the CESSNA 208 Caravan (powered by Superpilot) reversing out of the gate, taxiing onto the runway, launching a predetermined mission, landing and returning to the gate all on its own.

The flight was supervised by Xwing’s remote crew on the ground, along with Xwing’s safety pilot, Ryan Olson, from the cockpit.

Xwing has since completed more than 17,000 flights covering two million miles and delivered more than nine million pounds worth of goods.

While autonomous aircraft sound like the way things are in the world, pilots are urging the FAA to say ‘no’ to the technology.”

A California Startup, Xwing, Is Also Looking To Enter The Autonomous Aircraft Race With Its Fully Functional Self-Driving Cargo Plane

A California startup, Xwing, is also looking to enter the autonomous aircraft race with its fully functional self-driving cargo plane

In 2021, Xwing Completed Its First Demonstration, With The Cessna 208 Caravan (Powered By Superpilot) Reversing Out Of The Gate, Taxiing Onto The Runway, Taking Off For A Predetermined Mission, Landing And Returning To The Gate All On Its Own

In 2021, Xwing completed its first demonstration, with the CESSNA 208 Caravan (powered by Superpilot) reversing out of the gate, taxiing onto the runway, taking off for a predetermined mission, landing and returning to the gate all on its own

While Autonomous Aircraft Sound Like The Way Things Are Going In The World, Pilots Are Urging The Faa To Say 'No' To The Technology'

While autonomous aircraft sound like the way things are going in the world, pilots are urging the FAA to say ‘no’ to the technology’

Jennifer Weeks Is Not A Pilot, But She Worked On A Case Study About The Airbus A320 That Was Forced To Land In New York'S Hudson River In 2009 After Hitting A Flock Of Birds

Jennifer Weeks is not a pilot, but she worked on a case study about the Airbus A320 that was forced to land in New York’s Hudson River in 2009 after hitting a flock of birds

James Newling said he flew 10 p.m. and found that the most important safety feature of an aircraft is “a multi-crew environment.”

“This is simply airline management increasing their bonuses while allowing a major deterioration in safety. FAA, please say no now,” he tweeted.

Jennifer Weeks is not a pilot, but she worked on a case study about the Airbus A320 that was forced to land in New York’s Hudson River in 2009 after hitting a flock of birds.

“Sully (the pilot) got credit, but without a first officer he would have figured out where to come down and do the water landing checklist at the same time. Two pilots are essential.’

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Jacky

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