WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Self-employed who do not help Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s bailout

Rishi Sunak finally unveiled a multimillion-pound coronavirus for millions of afflicted self-employed people tonight – but left hundreds of thousands just above a ‘cliff edge’ line asking how they would make ends meet.

Ken Price, 50, who works as a roofer in London and the South East, said he was concerned that people would have to wait until June for the rescue payment,

“Three months will be hard enough for people who have money behind them,” he told MailOnline.

Made available in this image by the British government as no media allowed 10 Downing Street due to the coronavirus pandemic, in which the Chancellor of the Treasury Rishi Sunak held a digital press conference on the COVID-19 coronavirus, in 10 Downing Street, London today

Made available in this image by the British government as no media allowed 10 Downing Street due to the coronavirus pandemic, in which the Chancellor of the Treasury Rishi Sunak held a digital press conference on the COVID-19 coronavirus, in 10 Downing Street, London today

“People who live from week to week are in trouble.

“How many people do you know who can sit at home for two and a half months without paying their bills?”

He added that the financial survival during lockdown depends on ‘the goodwill of creditors’.

“It’s a wait-and-see job,” he said. “It is clear that we are in unknown territory, but it seems that it is a matter of choosing between food and bills.”

“Come April, those bills just don’t get paid.”

Driving instructor Rob Cooling echoed Price’s concerns, saying many self-employed people will struggle if they have to wait until June for their money.

Pictured: Rob Cooling, 40, from Nottingham, who runs Apple Driving School, and teaches special needs students. “I think many driving instructors will feel like they could have driven it for a month if they got money in April, but if it doesn’t turn up until the end of June, many will have a hard time,” he said

His company, Apple Driving School, teaches special needs students.

The 40-year-old Mr. Cooling from Nottingham normally earns approximately £ 20,000 a year after taxes.

But on Monday, he had to postpone all his classes for at least a month after the prime minister announced a lockdown.

Mr Cooling, who has been leading the school for 15 years, said: “I love my job and it was very sad to have to cancel.

“I think many driving instructors feel they could have chased it off for a month if they got money in April, but if it doesn’t show up until late June, many will be struggling.”

Joe Nutkins earns £ 13,500 a year through her dog training business. And she has received loans from old customers who want to help her during the outbreak.

Joe Nutkins (pictured) earns £ 13,500 a year through her dog training business. And she has received loans from old customers who want to help her during the outbreak

Joe Nutkins (pictured) earns £ 13,500 a year through her dog training business. And she has received loans from old customers who want to help her during the outbreak

Joe Nutkins (pictured) earns £ 13,500 a year through her dog training business. And she has received loans from old customers who want to help her during the outbreak

Her company, Dog Training for Essex and Suffolk, is twelve years old and has annual sales of around £ 28,000.

But the 40-year-old now fears that if the money doesn’t come soon enough, she won’t be able to afford the £ 700 a month rent for her businesses.

Joe, who lives with husband Jon, 40, a police community support officer, asks dog owners £ 140 to attend an 11-week puppy course.

Many pay a deposit of £ 45 and then the full balance. But since the outbreak started, older owners and others who live with vulnerable people have lost weight.

Her income this week was just £ 200. Every month she has to earn at least £ 1,200 a month to pay her £ 700 rent, along with bills, insurance premiums and loan repayments she has taken out for renovations.

Joe said, “When I discovered that I wouldn’t be able to take classes in person, my anxiety levels got very high.

“I need to see if I’m eligible and if this money won’t come in until June, I may need to apply for a business interruption loan.”

Hannah Murphy is not sure if she is eligible for government support.

The mother of three runs Globe Fit, which gives dance and fitness classes to schools.

Her after-tax income is over £ 50,000, but this includes dividends from her husband’s business.

Hannah Murphy (photo) is not sure if she is eligible for government support. The mother of three runs Globe Fit, which gives dance and fitness classes to schools

Hannah Murphy (photo) is not sure if she is eligible for government support. The mother of three runs Globe Fit, which gives dance and fitness classes to schools

Hannah Murphy (photo) is not sure if she is eligible for government support. The mother of three runs Globe Fit, which gives dance and fitness classes to schools

She says she will have to check her accounts to make sure they won’t push her over the threshold where most of her income doesn’t come from self-employment.

Ms. Murphy usually gives workshops in schools across the country, but these have not been possible since the schools were closed on Friday.

Customers can pay £ 5 to join one of her online classes, but with celebrities like Joe Wicks offering free workouts, she says she only earns ‘pocket money’ right now.

Ms. Murphy, who lives in Fareham, Hampshire, with husband Tom, 36, a project manager, started Globe Fit seven years ago and is working with about 40 freelance instructors, who are desperately waiting to find out what the government will do to help them .

Ms. Murphy, 35, said, “I’m obviously happy to get something, it’s just kind of confusing and I think I should sit down and work where I am.”

Ruth Mary Chipperfield, 30, runs Ruth Mary Jewelery, an online Birmingham jewelry store, but is concerned that reinvesting her profits into gold since the company opened three years ago means she is not entitled to Sunak’s scheme.

Ruth Mary Chipperfield (photo), 30, runs Ruth Mary Jewelery, an online jewelery store in Birmingham, but is concerned that reinvesting her profits into gold since the company opened three years ago means she is not entitled to Sunak's scheme

Ruth Mary Chipperfield (photo), 30, runs Ruth Mary Jewelery, an online jewelery store in Birmingham, but is concerned that reinvesting her profits into gold since the company opened three years ago means she is not entitled to Sunak's scheme

Ruth Mary Chipperfield (photo), 30, runs Ruth Mary Jewelery, an online jewelery store in Birmingham, but is concerned that reinvesting her profits into gold since the company opened three years ago means she is not entitled to Sunak’s scheme

“I have no profit on the tax return. But my overheads are still going on, ”she told MailOnline.

She added that the £ 20,000 work planned has “ dried up ” since the coronavirus started migrating across the country.

“They can still go on after all this, but the problem is that my clients’ own finances are also drying up and people are super careful.”

The 30-year-old said reinvesting in precious gold means she’s still “ handing out quite a bit. ”

“Because it’s based on profit and not revenue, I’m not entitled to anything.”

Matt Rann, 27, and his wife Annalize, 25, from Portsmouth, who produce personalized photo charms through their company Annalize Jewelery, told the MailOnline that their limited liability status and role as director means they will fall through the gaps of the rescue program .

Matt Rann, 27, and his wife Annalize, 25, from Portsmouth, (pictured in a family photo) who produce personalized photo charms through their company Annalize Jewelery, told the MailOnline that their limited liability status and their role as directors means that they the gaps of the bailout will fall

Matt Rann, 27, and his wife Annalize, 25, from Portsmouth, (pictured in a family photo) who produce personalized photo charms through their company Annalize Jewelery, told the MailOnline that their limited liability status and their role as directors means that they the gaps of the bailout will fall

Matt Rann, 27, and his wife Annalize, 25, from Portsmouth, (pictured in a family photo) who produce personalized photo charms through their company Annalize Jewelery, told the MailOnline that their limited liability status and their role as directors means that they the gaps of the bailout will fall

He said, “For us, sales have fallen by about 75-80 percent. Everything we do is generally bought for birthdays and gifts. It is one of the first things people turn down when they have no money. Jewelry is not a luxury.

‘On paper we are employed by our own public limited company and are paid via a PAYE. As directors we pay ourselves the minimum wage and the rest is dividend.

“We have been told that we cannot renew ourselves because we are directors, and we cannot claim self-employment because we are not classified as such.

“I think the government has done a good job and done as much as possible, but it’s almost as if they were in a bit of a rush and failed to work out the conditions and leave a lot of questions open.

“I think it leaves a pretty big hole and a lot of people in the same situation as us. We are directors, but are not considered self-employed. ‘

Photo of Jess Salamanca, who started Banana Scoop in June, said she can't claim Rishi Sunak's new scheme because she's only been active for ten months

Photo of Jess Salamanca, who started Banana Scoop in June, said she cannot claim Rishi Sunak's new scheme because she has only been active for ten months

Photo of Jess Salamanca, who started Banana Scoop in June, said she can’t claim Rishi Sunak’s new scheme because she’s only been active for ten months

Some who were about to start their businesses have been derailed by the coronavirus outbreak.

Jess Salamanca, founder of Banana Scoop, a dairy-free and vegan ice cream company in June.

She said she cannot claim the Sunak scheme since she has only been active for 10 months.

“The problem is they forget certain people and understand it’s incredibly complex,” she said.

“Those who have been doing their own business for a few months will miss the boat on this one.”

.

Comments
Loading...