Self-driving cars can be controlled by hackers to cause traffic jams and accidents in large cities

Deadly crashes, ambulances stopped in their tracks and chaos in chaos: how self-driving cars can be hacked to cause chaos, researchers claim

  • Physicists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Multiscale Systems, Inc. have published the findings of their research on ways in which future hackers can spread chaos
  • Their research found that blocking 20 percent of cars during rush hour at places such as New York City a & # 39; total traffic freeze & # 39; would cause
  • Hacking 10 percent of all cars during rush hour could make the traffic jam serious enough to prevent emergency vehicles from coming through the streets of the city
  • Researchers recommend breaking up digital networks used by connected cars so that hackers may not give hackers access to too many vehicles
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Self-driving cars can be hacked and forced to crash in the near future, researchers have warned.

Travel delays are perhaps the least worry of people in the year 2026 when tens of millions of self-driving cars are expected to drive on American roads recent data collected by physicists at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Fatal accidents and injured or sick people who die in ambulances stuck in a stalemate are two potentially serious consequences of cyber attack vehicles connected to the internet.

& # 39; Unlike most of the data breaches we are hearing about, hacked cars have physical effects, & # 39; said assistant professor and co-leader Peter Yunker of Georgia Tech's School of Physics in a written statement about the research.

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Driving through rush hour traffic in major cities such as New York is already a big hassle for millions of motorists, but researchers say the situation could be much worse in the near future as self-driving cars susceptible to hackers become the norm

Fatal accidents and injured or sick people dying in a stalemate in ambulances are two potentially serious consequences of cyber attacks on vehicles connected to the internet

Fatal accidents and injured or sick people dying in a stalemate in ambulances are two potentially serious consequences of cyber attacks on vehicles connected to the internet

Fatal accidents and injured or sick people who die in ambulances stuck in a stalemate are two potentially serious consequences of cyber attacks on vehicles connected to the internet (in the photo a self-driving Uber SUV is knocked down after a crash)

Yunker and three co-authors simulated what a group of hacked self-driving cars would do to drive traffic in a place like Manhattan, where streets and avenues form a grid designed to reduce the potential for commuter blocking.

Assistant professor and study co-leader Peter Yunker (photo) of Georgia Tech's School of Physics and three co-authors simulated what a group of hacked self-driving cars would do to do traffic in a place like Manhattan

Assistant professor and study co-leader Peter Yunker (photo) of Georgia Tech's School of Physics and three co-authors simulated what a group of hacked self-driving cars would do to do traffic in a place like Manhattan

Assistant professor and study co-leader Peter Yunker (photo) of Georgia Tech's School of Physics and three co-authors simulated what a group of hacked self-driving cars would do to do traffic in a place like Manhattan

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They found that only 20 percent of cars & # 39; s would crash during rush hour, a & # 39; total traffic freeze & # 39; would cause.

& # 39; With 20 percent, the city is split into small islands, where you might be able to crawl around a few blocks, but no one could move around the city, & # 39; said graduate research assistant David Yanni.

Hacking and shutting down only 10 percent of cars on the road during rush hour would be sufficient to prevent emergency vehicles from driving through the streets, prevent potentially dying people from being transported to hospitals, or worse, prevent EMT from traveling to sick and injured people comes first.

It is not just rush hour. The researchers determined that the same level of debilitating traffic jams would occur with a 20 percent hack during & # 39; average & # 39; traffic during the day. All this could happen in New York, although the most populous city in America is perhaps the least vulnerable to this sort of stalemate.

& # 39; Manhattan has a nice grid and that makes traffic more efficient & # 39 ;, Yunker said. & # 39; Looking at cities without large networks such as Atlanta, Boston or Los Angeles, and we think hackers can do more harm, because a roster makes you more robust with layoffs to come to the same places on many different routes. & # 39 ;

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Car engineers and city planners who want to avoid the potential threat of terrorists, hackers and other malicious cyber invaders may want to invest in placing smart cars on multiple digital networks to prevent cyber attackers from accessing each car by simply endanger one or two web networks.

& # 39; If you could also prevent cars & # 39; s from being hacked side by side at the same time, this would reduce the risk of blocking traffic together, & # 39; said postdoctural researcher and lead author Skanka Vivek.

An illustration of the effects that self-driving cars have hacked on traffic

An illustration of the effects that self-driving cars have hacked on traffic

An illustration of the effects that self-driving cars have hacked on traffic

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