See the other side of the moon like never before: China releases stunning new images

See the other side of the moon like never before: China releases stunning new images captured by its Yutu 2 robber as the mission moves to another long lunar night

  • The mission of China & # 39; s moon has exceeded expectations and has released new moon images
  • Yutu 2 and his lander are in hibernation as the look to enter their fifth Monday
  • The mission seems to analyze the layers of the moon's mantle, never seen before

China & # 39; s Chang & # 39; e 4 lander and Yutu 2 rover captured new images during their successful mission to explore the other side of the moon while the duo looks forward to extending their studies to a fifth Monday.

On the moon, the cycle of day and night is almost 30 Earth days in total, each with about two weeks.

The new images captured from the rover, Yutu 2 and released this month, offer more of the mission's journey after a first photo round was released after their arrival at the 115-mile-wide Von Kármán crater in January.

Objectives of the lander and rover mission – the very first to go across the moon's exploration – include analyzing chemical differences between the moon-facing side of the moon and the target area of ​​the mission.

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China & # 39; s Chang¿e 4 mission has been a great success with his lander and robber who have amply exceeded their expected lifetime. The new images captured from the rover, Yutu 2 and released this month, offer more of the mission's journey

The Chang & # 39; e 4 mission in China has been a great success with his lander and robber, who have amply exceeded their expected lifetime. The new images captured from the rover, Yutu 2 and released this month, offer more of the mission's journey

As reported by the Planetary Society, no hard science about Chang & # 39; e 4's mission has yet emerged, but scientists involved in the project said the area under investigation shows potential evidence for excavation deep material that could reveal the mineralogy of the moon's mantle. & # 39;

The other side of the moon, which is the hemisphere that is always off Earth, has yet to be explored by such missions, and like its Earth-visible counterpart, the location experiences intervals of two weeks of sunlight and two weeks of darkness.

According to a report from Space.com, the mission of Chang & # 39; e 4 has already greatly exceeded expectations.

The spacecraft was initially designed to last a total of about three lunar days.

Both the lander and the robber are currently in sleep mode while resting on a moon night, but on April 28, when another day of two weeks arrives on the other side of the moon, both would go on their fifth Monday, considering she & # 39; still fully intact.

With their extensive data, scientists hope to reveal facts about our early solar system. The other side of the moon, which is the hemisphere that is always off Earth, must still be investigated by such missions before

With their extensive data, scientists hope to reveal facts about our early solar system. The other side of the moon, which is the hemisphere that is always off Earth, must still be investigated by such missions before

With their extensive data, scientists hope to reveal facts about our early solar system. The other side of the moon, which is the hemisphere that is always off Earth, must still be investigated by such missions before

The robber of the mission, Yutu 2, has passed his predecessor with an extra 60 meters so far

The robber of the mission, Yutu 2, has passed his predecessor with an extra 60 meters so far

The robber of the mission, Yutu 2, has passed his predecessor with an extra 60 meters so far

Due to the harsh temperatures of the day rising to 390 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius), the robber must also take an occasional nap – short periods of hibernation – until he can move again.

Despite the dangers and obstacles of exploring the other side of the moon, the Yutu 2 has managed to travel less than 180 meters during its one-month stay.

With what data scientists have already collected and what bonus material the rover can also collect on potential efforts later this month, researchers are planning to analyze the results and then publish them in about a month, the Planetary Society said.

In addition to satisfying people's curiosity about the other side of the moon, the mission will also help scientists understand the composition of our early solar system.

Craters studied by the robber were created by an ancient impact where layers of the moon's mantle are exposed, where they can be studied to determine its content and more.

WHY DID CHINA KNOW THE LAND IN THE VON KARMAN CRATER?

Chang & e-4 landed in the Von Karman crater in the South Pole-Aitken basin.

This is a huge crater that is located at the southernmost point of the moon.

China chose to study the other side of the moon and thus defeated all other nations to the historical moment.

The basin is so far the largest known impact basin in the solar system.

The Chinese space agency hopes that by exploring the huge divot on the surface of the moon, they can shed some light on its history and geology by collecting stones that have never been seen before.

Researchers hope that the enormous depth of the crater will allow them to study the moon's mantle, the layer below the surface of the moon.

It is believed that the crater consists of various chemical compounds, including thorium, iron oxide and titanium dioxide.

It is also hoped that by assessing this 8-mile deep scar on the surface of the moon, scientists could find clues to merge the origins of the moon's mantle.

There is also another logistical reason for choosing the landing site, the crater is usually right in the south of the basin.

This increased the chance of a successful landing.

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