The platypus (photo) can bend to death if the rubber band is not removed from the neck

Desperate search for platypus with painful suffocating death as a result of tightening the wristband around his neck

  • A platypus in Lismore can grind to death with a rubber band around its neck
  • WIRES have started catching efforts to locate the animal, but have not been successful
  • Another platypus was killed after elastic bands were caught around his body
  • CABLES encourage people to reduce their plastic waste to protect wild animals

Wildlife officers have started a desperate search for a platypus with a life-threatening wristband around his neck.

The image was made this week by nature lover and photographer Wal Bailey, in Lismore, on the north coast of New South Wales, so the nature services started a direct search to find the affected animal.

There are fears that the amphibious animal will choke slowly and die if the orange rubber band is not removed quickly.

The platypus (photo) can bend to death if the rubber band is not removed from the neck

The platypus (photo) can bend to death if the rubber band is not removed from the neck

Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service (WIRES) posted the image on its Facebook page on Monday and urged the locals to monitor the affected platypus, which runs a risk of choking.

& # 39; The more immediate concern is that the band is caught on a snare in the creek as the platypus forages and that it can drown if it is unable to surface for air, & # 39; wrote a WIRES spokesperson.

Platypus are nocturnal, which makes searching for the animal difficult.

& # 39; Platypus are very mysterious creatures, mostly nocturnal but sometimes seen at dusk and in the morning. Observing this individual would be one thing – releasing the plastic ring would be a completely different problem, & said the spokesperson.

The organization contacted National Parks and Wildlife, the Ministry of Primary Industries, Southern Cross University, Lismore City Council, the local Landcare group, and the Australian Platypus Conservancy in an effort to find the band and remove the platypus.

Another baby platypus (photo) was euthanized in May after it was found struggling to move with four elastic bands wrapped around its body.

Another baby platypus (photo) was euthanized in May after it was found struggling to move with four elastic bands wrapped around its body.

Another baby platypus (photo) was euthanized in May after it was found struggling to move with four elastic bands wrapped around its body.

Initially, a containment effort was organized with volunteers from WIRES who laid nets and guarded them during the night.

The first attempt was unsuccessful and led to a second fall by the experienced platypus researcher Gilad Bino from the University of New South Wales.

Mr. Bino and his team stayed up again all night to check the traps but couldn't find the struggling platypus.

WIRES have encouraged people to reduce their plastic waste, as this could mean an early death for some of Australia & # 39; s most beloved wildlife.

& # 39; The plight of this poor platypus is yet another reminder to the public of the dangers of plastic rings, and the terrible toll plastic has on wildlife, & # 39; said the spokesman.

This is not the first time that a platypus has fallen victim to carefree litter.

Another baby platypus was euthanized in May after it was found struggling to move with four elastic bands wrapped around its body in Bright, Victoria.

The platypus was tragically put down after being unable to recover from the injuries due to the elastic bands (pictured)

The platypus was tragically put down after being unable to recover from the injuries due to the elastic bands (pictured)

The platypus was tragically put down after being unable to recover from the injuries due to the elastic bands (pictured)

The damage was so bad for the neck and foreleg of the creatures that the wounds had disappeared to the bone.

The chance that the animal would recover from its terrible injuries was considered so remote that it had to be deposited.

& # 39; The main threats to platypus are habitat change, pollution, change in river flow, illegal fishing nets, tramping river banks and entangling litter, & # 39; said Jo Mitlehner of Staghorn Wildlife Shelter.

& # 39; It is essential that we learn to stop waste on our waterways. & # 39;

CABLES ask anyone who has seen the platypus in Lismore to call 66281898 so that a rescue mission can be arranged.

Wildlife services encourage people to reduce their plastic waste to ensure that more animals are not injured

Wildlife services encourage people to reduce their plastic waste to ensure that more animals are not injured

Wildlife services encourage people to reduce their plastic waste to ensure that more animals are not injured

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