The local resident Toni Miro did not hesitate to jump in and help the turtle who was clearly struggling in the water

Sea turtle caught in plastic is cut from ropes and junk and swims after rescuers spot it from the island of Majorca

  • Locals Toni Miro and Miguel Nicolau came to rescue the entangled turtle
  • A man on a cliff at Soller's beach had sounded the alarm after seeing it in the water
  • Toni Miro said it took 15 minutes to cut the marine animal off the ropes

This is the time when saveda locals were scrambling with sea turtles after being caught in a jumble of ropes and plastic from the Spanish island of Mallorca.

In a video of the rescue, Toni Miro can be seen venturing towards the turtle as he struggles in the crystal blue waters off Soller beach, in Port de Soller.

While his co-rescuer, Miguel Nicolau, navigates a boat behind him and comes closer to the sea creature, it becomes clear that the turtle's right wing is firmly entangled in a cluster of yellow ropes attached to two plastic bottles.

The local resident Toni Miro did not hesitate to jump in and help the turtle who was clearly struggling in the water

The local resident Toni Miro did not hesitate to jump in and help the turtle who was clearly struggling in the water

Mr. Miro grabs the turtle who has difficulty swimming and starts the delicate operation to free him.

He can be seen in the video with a small pair of scissors to cut the ropes, while avoiding the fluttering turtle's attempts to bite.

Mr. Nicolau helps by sticking to the caught pinball and the maze of waste.

The turtle is finally released and can be seen while swimming away from the boat while the duo is celebrating.

M. Miro told local paper Ultima Hora the rescue lasted about fifteen minutes.

& # 39; I jumped in, Miguel held him and after 15 minutes of trying to get him out without damaging him and getting bitten, we managed to cut the net and left the scene. & # 39 ;

A close-up image shows the turtle with the jumble of yellow ropes around its right front fin and what appears to be two plastic bottles attached

A close-up image shows the turtle with the jumble of yellow ropes around its right front fin and what appears to be two plastic bottles attached

A close-up image shows the turtle with the jumble of yellow ropes around its right front fin and what appears to be two plastic bottles attached

Miro uses a pair of scissors to cut through the tangle of plastic rope while his co-rescuer manes the boat and tries to hold on to the mess attached to the pinball machine

Miro uses a pair of scissors to cut through the tangle of plastic rope while his co-rescuer manes the boat and tries to hold on to the mess attached to the pinball machine

Miro uses a pair of scissors to cut through the tangle of plastic rope while his co-rescuer manes the boat and tries to hold on to the mess attached to the pinball machine

It is a delicate operation to cut the turtle's flipper away from the plastic rope without getting bitten

It is a delicate operation to cut the turtle's flipper away from the plastic rope without getting bitten

It is a delicate operation to cut the turtle's flipper away from the plastic rope without getting bitten

Mr. Miro said they had been warned by a man on a cliff above the harbor that the turtle had something strange in the water.

They investigated and found the tortoise struggling in the tangle of rope and plastic.

The video of the subsequent rescue was shared on social media with much commentary on the good deed and calling on people to do better with their use of plastics.

Helena Macein Sancho wrote: “Thank goodness you have found you! Well done. & # 39;

Lida Crespi said: & # 39; Reduce the use of plastic, no more excuses, thanks for helping. & # 39;

The turtle swims away as soon as the pinball is free from the tangle of plastic waste

The turtle swims away as soon as the pinball is free from the tangle of plastic waste

The turtle swims away as soon as the pinball is free from the tangle of plastic waste

A 2018 report published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, it appeared that there was a one in five chance (20 percent) of death for a turtle that caught only one piece of plastic. This increased to 50 percent if they took 14 pieces.

In 2017, a survey by 106 maritime experts from the University of Exeter showed that more than 1,000 turtles are killed each year after being caught in lost fishing nets, plastic twine and other garbage in the sea.

Ninety-one percent of entangled turtles are found dead in many who have had serious injuries, amputated limbs, or who have been choked to death.

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