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Sea bacon? Toxic creature that looks like RAW MEAT washes up on the Australian beach

Sea bacon? Toxic red and white creature that looks like RAW MEAT washes up on an Australian beach

  • The Spanish Dancer sea snail moves by contracting and waving its body
  • This makes the poisonous marine animal look like it’s dancing
  • Seen outside the water, “the creature may look like a piece of raw bacon”

It looks like something from the delicatessen in the supermarket, but this bizarre discovery is actually a poisonous marine animal that is best known for its dances.

Stephanie Harrison, 29, met the rarely seen critter on the banks of the Elliott River in Queensland, Australia, while enjoying the great outdoors.

“I was camping and fishing with my husband when we saw him,” said Stephanie from Bundaberg.

‘It was really flat with different shades of red and white over it. It looked soft and slimy, but we didn’t touch it. ”

The red and white sea snail looks like something from the deli in the supermarket, but the bright colors serve as a warning to potential predators that it is toxic

The red and white sea snail looks like something from the deli in the supermarket, but the bright colors serve as a warning to potential predators that it is toxic

Seen outside the water, “the creature could look like a piece of raw bacon,” according to the local media in Bundaberg

What she had found was the mysterious Spanish sea snail.

When threatened, it swims away by contracting its body and waving – a graceful movement that gives the creature its name.

Seen outside the water, “the creature could look like a piece of raw bacon,” according to the local media in Bundaberg.

It is a common species in the Indo-Pacific region, but most people will never encounter it – they tend to avoid daylight and hide among the rocks.

“I’ve never seen one,” said Stephanie.

“My grandfather said they usually stay in the ocean; it is very rare to see them along the rivers and creeks. ”

This is how the Spanish dancer normally looks under water. It swims away by contracting its body and waving - a graceful movement that gives the creature its name

This is how the Spanish dancer normally looks under water. It swims away by contracting its body and waving - a graceful movement that gives the creature its name

This is how the Spanish dancer normally looks under water. It swims away by contracting its body and waving – a graceful movement that gives the creature its name

Nourished by a diet of sponges, the Spanish dancer absorbs toxins from his prey and uses a chemical defense for himself and his eggs (shown in their poisonous rosy cluster)

Nourished by a diet of sponges, the Spanish dancer absorbs toxins from his prey and uses a chemical defense for himself and his eggs (shown in their poisonous rosy cluster)

Nourished by a diet of sponges, the Spanish dancer absorbs toxins from his prey and uses a chemical defense for himself and his eggs (shown in their poisonous rosy cluster)

The bright colors of the Spanish dancer serve as a warning to potential predators that they are not good to eat and can even make them sick.

It is a message that Stephanie received loud and clear.

“We didn’t touch it because we didn’t know for sure if it was toxic with its bright colors,” she said.

“We didn’t know anything until we asked it at a fishing group on Facebook.”

Nourished by a diet of sponges, the Spanish dancer absorbs toxins from his prey and uses a chemical defense for himself and his eggs.

The rarely seen sea critter was spotted on the banks of the Elliott River in Queensland, Australia

The rarely seen sea critter was spotted on the banks of the Elliott River in Queensland, Australia

The rarely seen sea critter was spotted on the banks of the Elliott River in Queensland, Australia

It is such a successful deterrent that the species places its eggs in view of coral reefs, leaving them unaffected in a rosy cluster, peppered with poison to ward off predators.

All specimens are both male and female, but they cannot fertilize themselves, and always need a partner.

“We are very lucky to see one up close and personally, because they are very rare,” Stephanie said.

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