Scott Morrison uploads a video to Twitter that says Australia's record drought is "necessary evil" # 039;

The new prime minister, Scott Morrison, has been criticized for uploading a video in which a farmer appears suggesting that the paralyzing drought in New South Wales is a

When he became prime minister, Scott Morrison said his top priority was to alleviate the record-breaking drought for Australian farmers.

But on Monday, the prime minister tweeted a video of his Prime Minister's Twitter account, in which farmers in New South Wales call the drought a "necessary evil."

Accompanied the video with the caption: "Another perspective on the drought", and at the end of the film there is an authorization confirming that the video was made on behalf of "S. Morrison, Liberal Party, Canberra & # 39 ;.

The new prime minister, Scott Morrison, has been criticized for uploading a video in which a farmer appears suggesting that the paralyzing drought in New South Wales is a "necessary evil".

Just two days after the tweet, the shadow agriculture minister, Joel Fitzgibbon, asked Mr. Morrison about the video during question time, saying: "Why are Australians making an extraordinary effort to help farmers in the drought, the Prime Minister is promoting material that rejects the farmers who suffer the most?

But Mr. Morrison replied that he had no memories. of & # 39; subject & # 39;

After the question time, Mr. Morrison said that the message was intended to highlight what the drought meant to the farmers who appeared in it, and not to "censor" the opinions of anyone else.

Mr. Morrison has been widely criticized for publishing the video, which rationalizes the drought that currently devastates the New South Wales region as "sensationalist" by the media.

Two farmers continue to say that "good operators" will survive the drought, while those who "probably should not be there anyway" will be eliminated.

The video presents comments from feedlot operators Michael MacCue and Sandy Munro in northwest New South Wales.

Feedlot operators Michael MacCue (left) and Sandy Munro (right) give their comments in the video titled: "Another perspective on drought"

Filming shows the two men marching well-fed cattle, saying that the drought has been "sensationalized" and that prepared farmers would survive, while the bottom 10% will not.

In the recording, both men showed their well-fed cattle, saying that those who were not prepared to weather a drought should not be farmers.

"We are competing with people who, in fact, if they had time to do so, would have sold their cows from the beginning, but now they are committed," said MacCue.

Mr. Munro minimized the natural disaster and said: "We have had droughts before and we will have them again".

Mr. Morrison has been criticized for the video, people say he is using it for his own benefit

Mr. Morrison has been criticized for the video, people say he is using it for his own benefit

Mr. Morrison has been criticized for the video, people say he is using it for his own benefit

A man who claims to be a farmer asks for a ballot after the controversial video

A man who claims to be a farmer asks for a ballot after the controversial video

A man who claims to be a farmer asks for a ballot after the controversial video

The sheep and cattle rancher Annabel Tully (right) collapsed while discussing the drought with the prime minister (left) in August

The sheep and cattle rancher Annabel Tully (right) collapsed while discussing the drought with the prime minister (left) in August

The sheep and cattle rancher Annabel Tully (right) broke while discussing the drought with the prime minister (left) in August

Those who reviewed the video did not agree with Mr. Morrison's reasoning, saying that the prime minister was using the drought to promote his own agenda.

Earlier in the week, Greenpeace Australia protested Mr. Morrison's return to parliament, lashing out at the lack of a climate change policy.

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