Scott Morrison knocks a beer back during a visit to the city and fights flood damage

Prime Minister Scott Morrison posed for a photo with a schooner of beer in his hand while chatting with farmers during his first trip since winning the election.

Mr. Morrison flew to northwestern Queensland to inspect properties that were flooded by the February floods, which are thought to have killed 500,000 cattle.

A relaxed-looking Morrison seemed to be channeling late Bob Hawke while drinking a pint while he was chatting with locals in the Cloncurry bowls club on Thursday.

Hawke was known as the leader of the beer lover who was often depicted with a beer in his hand.

Two opened cans of XXXX Gold mid-strength appeared strategically placed in front of Morrison while he spoke to a barber at the bar.

Premier of the people: Scott Morrison and the head of the North Queensland Livestock Industry Recovery Agency Shane Stone drink a beer during a visit to Cloncurry Bowls Club during the Thursday in Cloncurry

Premier of the people: Scott Morrison and the head of the North Queensland Livestock Industry Recovery Agency Shane Stone drink a beer during a visit to Cloncurry Bowls Club during the Thursday in Cloncurry

Cheers: Thursday marked the first trip for the newly elected leader after last week's elections

Cheers: Thursday marked the first trip for the newly elected leader after last week's elections

Cheers: Thursday marked the first trip for the newly elected leader after last week's elections

Morrison later paid homage to the resilience of Queenslanders who had been devastated by the natural disaster as he addressed the crowd from the club's steps.

& # 39; What I absolutely know is that this part of Australia will be lively, successful and prosperous for generations to come & # 39 ;, he told hundreds of locals on Thursday night.

& # 39; It will happen because of the hard work and commitment of the people who are here.

& # 39; This was one of those moments when I think Australians really all came together and showed everyone what we can do. & # 39;

Hours prior to his trip to the club, the prime minister had stepped directly from an airplane and was on his way to meet with a water repair agency.

The agency, led by Shane Stone, former head of the Northern Territory, has since the start in March nine community forums spread over outback Queensland.

The new Bob Hawke? Standing on the steps of the Cloncurry bowls club, he paid tribute to the resilience of Queenslanders, destroyed by the natural disaster

The new Bob Hawke? Standing on the steps of the Cloncurry bowls club, he paid tribute to the resilience of Queenslanders, destroyed by the natural disaster

The new Bob Hawke? Standing on the steps of the Cloncurry bowls club, he paid tribute to the resilience of Queenslanders, destroyed by the natural disaster

Farmers are offered payouts, concessional loans and access to support for mental health care.

More than $ 3.3 billion has been paid or committed to help farmers respond and recover.

Mr. Morrison praised the agency for reaching desperate farmers so quickly.

& # 39; It was a very, very significant and very fragile time for this part of the country, & he said to the heads of the agencies.

& # 39; The speed with which we had to respond was really clear to me. The urgency was what was needed and governments really had to get up. This team here has enabled the government to stand up. & # 39;

Hundreds of locals entered the bowling club to join the premier for a sundowner.

With an open fire on the barbecue, Mr. Morrison sauntered his way through a heaving crowd past the bar, often stopping for a kiss and a hug.

Reports from that time suggested that millions of dollars in cattle drowned or frozen to death during the floods

Reports from that time suggested that millions of dollars in cattle drowned or frozen to death during the floods

Reports from that time suggested that millions of dollars in cattle drowned or frozen to death during the floods

The man in caps had a different gift – this time for the local collector.

Among the crowd was Brenda Bulley, a grayer from nearby Julia Creek.

She lost more than 60 percent of her shares in three buildings in the flood of February.

Nearly 2000 of her cattle were killed.

& # 39; The impact was devastating – to see the shares that had suffered, the way they died – the amount of shares we lost, & # 39; said Bulley.

& # 39; Even though it was a major financial setback, it was simply devastating to see how they died. & # 39;

In the aftermath of the floods, Ms. Bulley has received two special grants for disaster recovery worth $ 75,000, purchasing nearly 300 small oxen.

& # 39; Personally, we just want to say thank you – what he did is great – and also to follow up and return, & # 39; she said.

It is the Prime Minister's second trip to Cloncurry this year.

In February he inspected herds of cattle that had drowned, others were frozen and some were dead in dry mud.

On Friday, the Prime Minister is expected to visit a family farm that has received restoration subsidies, before meeting other primary producers during an outback sporting event.

The last visit reflects Mr Morrison's first voyage when he became Prime Minister last year, calling drought the top priority for his government.

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