WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Scott Morrison blamed for turning women against him causing Liberals to lose election 

Scott Morrison’s unpopularity cost the Liberal Party a winnable election against an opposition that lost millions of votes to the Greens and independents.

Labor won a comfortable victory on Saturday that is likely to send Anthony Albanese to The Lodge with a majority government.

However, his primary vote was just 32.8 percent, down 0.5 percent compared to 2019, and he only won a dozen seats at most.

Instead, the 5.5 per cent that walked away from the Coalition went to The Greens and the independent ‘Greens’ who snatched nine new seats between them.

Nowhere was this more apparent than at Ryan’s headquarters in Brisbane, where the Liberal MP was replaced by Elizabeth Watson-Brown of The Greens.

Scott Morrison's unpopularity cost the Liberal Party a winnable election against an opposition that lost millions of votes to the Greens and independents.

Scott Morrison’s unpopularity cost the Liberal Party a winnable election against an opposition that lost millions of votes to the Greens and independents.

Since its creation in 1974, the Liberals have won this seat in every general election, losing it briefly to Labor in a 2001 by-election but regaining it the same year.

The Greens gained a 10.2 percent turnaround to finish second in the primary vote on 30.5 percent, with Labor slipping back 2.2 percent.

Mrs Watson-Brown won 52.9 per cent of the final vote with a Labor preference.

This lineup of candidates, funded by millionaire Simon Holmes to Court, advocated strong action on climate change and other progressive policies and eliminated six moderate liberals in the inner-city constituencies.

Political analysts pointed out that these trends showed that Labor had not really learned the lesson.

Instead, it was the Coalition that lost out, as the big swing to minor parties showed that voters were frustrated with both options, not simply enamored with Labour.

Greens candidate Elizabeth Watson-Brown (left) celebrates the snatching of Ryan's former safe Liberal seat alongside Brisbane City Council Councilor Jonathan Sri (right).

Greens candidate Elizabeth Watson-Brown (left) celebrates the snatching of Ryan’s former safe Liberal seat alongside Brisbane City Council Councilor Jonathan Sri (right).

Monique Ryan, seen here with her children, spearheaded the rise of the Teal Independents by taking the Liberal Kooyong seat from former Treasurer Josh Frydenberg.

Monique Ryan, seen here with her children, spearheaded the rise of the Teal Independents by taking the Liberal Kooyong seat from former Treasurer Josh Frydenberg.

Political reporter Samantha Maiden said that Morrison “really screwed it up” and that the Liberals might have won because of Labor’s weakness if he hadn’t been so unpopular.

He said that Morrison was particularly unpopular with women, which was a decisive factor in his downfall.

“The data is pretty clear that it was also a women-driven loss,” she said.

“It was the women who decided that they were not happy with what was offered to them. It was women who helped elect a record number of independent women.’

Watson-Brown said she felt the mood swing among liberal voters ahead of the election.

“A lot of people came up to me before the vote and said, ‘Elizabeth, I’m voting for you this time. I’ve been a liberal voter for a long time and I feel completely abandoned,'” she said.

This analysis was supported by Dave Sharma, the outgoing MP from the wealthy Wentworth seat, once held by former Liberal Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Allegra Spender (right) holds on tight to her sister Bianca Spender as she ran for the Wentworth seat in Sydney, which she successfully claimed from Liberal Dave Sharma.

Allegra Spender (right) holds on tight to her sister Bianca Spender as she ran for the Wentworth seat in Sydney, which she successfully claimed from Liberal Dave Sharma.

Teal independent Allegra Spender, daughter of designer Carla Zampatti, who was reported by The Guardian to have thrown an election night party packed with wealthy young professionals who had fallen out with the Liberal Party.

“The polls showed that he (Morrison) had a negative approval rating in seats like mine, and he was a drag on the vote,” Sharma told ABC on Wednesday.

“When you talked to people, it was almost visceral.

They would say that he is too religious, they did not like that he once brought coal to parliament.

“They didn’t believe her sincerity on climate change, they didn’t like our handling of the Brittany Higgins rape allegations and Grace Tame’s comments; that kind of things.

The highest-profile Liberal eliminated by an independent was Josh Frydenberg, who lost to Monique Ryan in Kooyong, a seat with a prestigious Liberal pedigree of former members.

A handful of other once-strong Liberal seats, all held by men, also fell to Teal women, while Zali Stegall easily retained the Warringah seat she sensationally seized from former Liberal Prime Minister Tony Abbott in 2019.

Dave Sharma said Scott Morrison generated an 'almost visceral disgust" among voters in his constituency who did not like his more conservative approach to his handling of various issues

Dave Sharma said that Scott Morrison generated an “almost visceral dislike” among voters in his constituency who disliked his more conservative politics on his handling of various issues.

Outgoing finance minister Simon Birmingham has admitted the Liberals face an almost “impossible” task in forming a government if they cannot win back “heart seats”.

Mr Birmingham also believed that the women had sent the Liberals a “very clear message” that they needed to shortlist more women.

Former Victorian Liberal Deputy State Manager Tony Barry told ABC that the Liberals had “lost their base”. It seems that we no longer have a natural electorate.’

Steggall said the Teals’ success showed the Liberals had lost touch with their staunchest supporters.

‘The Liberal Party has lost its way when it comes to representing sensible views, [the] sensible center and has moved so far to the right that it has left so many people disenfranchised,” Ms Steggall told the Nine Network.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More