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Jackson Pollock is one of the most forged painters of all time. But new scientific analyzes of the works of the American artist allow experts to confirm what true Jackson Pollocks are

Forgeries of Jackson Pollock's iconic, splatter-like paintings always drip into the art world.

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But a new scientific analysis of the works of the American artist can have experts confirm those that are real and that are just & # 39; Pollocks & # 39; to be.

Pollock did not create his most typical works with a brush, but by painting paint from above on canvas and weaving colorful filaments into abstract masterpieces.

Experts analyzing the physics of Pollock's technique have shown that the artist has a & # 39; sharp understanding & # 39; had a classical phenomenon in fluid dynamics, if it was unaware.

Jackson Pollock is one of the most forged painters of all time. But new scientific analyzes of the works of the American artist allow experts to confirm what true Jackson Pollocks are

Jackson Pollock is one of the most forged painters of all time. But new scientific analyzes of the works of the American artist allow experts to confirm what true Jackson Pollocks are

Their findings show that Pollock & # 39; s technique seems to be deliberately avoiding what is known as & # 39; coiling instability & # 39; – the tendency of a viscous liquid to form curls and coils when poured onto a surface.

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Senior researcher Professor Roberto Zenit of Brown University in the United States said: & # 39; Like most painters, Jackson Pollock has gone through a long process of experimentation to perfect his technique.

& # 39; What we were trying to do with this research is figuring out what conclusions Pollock has drawn to perform his paintings the way he wanted.

& # 39; Our main finding in this article was that Pollock & # 39; s movements and the properties of his paints were such that he avoided this rollable instability. & # 39;

Prof Zenit said that Pollock & # 39; s technique usually consisted of pouring paint directly from a can or past a stick onto a canvas lying horizontally on the floor, often the & # 39; drip technique & # 39; mentioned.

But he said that was a bit of a & # 39; wrong name & # 39; is in the fluid mechanics language, while & # 39; dripping & # 39; means that the liquid is dosed in a way that creates discrete drops on the canvas.

Professor Zenit said that Pollock largely avoided drops in favor of unbroken paint filaments that stretched over the canvas.

To understand exactly how the technique worked, Prof. Zenit and colleagues from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico analyzed an extensive video of Pollock at work, carefully measuring how fast he moved and how far from the canvas his paint was gutter.

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The research team then used an experimental set-up to replicate his technique.

Using the set-up, the researchers were able to deposit paint using a syringe mounted at different heights on a canvas with different speeds.

Pollock did not create his most iconic works with a brush, but by painting paint from above on canvas and weaving colorful filaments into abstract masterpieces

Pollock did not create his most iconic works with a brush, but by painting paint from above on canvas and weaving colorful filaments into abstract masterpieces

Pollock did not create his most iconic works with a brush, but by painting paint from above on canvas and weaving colorful filaments into abstract masterpieces

The experiments helped to identify the most important aspects of what Pollock did.

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Prof Zenit explained: & # 39; We can vary one thing at a time, so that we can decipher the most important elements of the technique.

& # 39; For example, we can vary the height from which the paint is poured and keep the speed constant to see how that changes things. & # 39;

The researchers discovered that the combination of Pollock & # 39; s hand speed, the distance he maintained from the canvas and the viscosity of his paint seem to be aimed at preventing winding instability.

Prof. Zenit said that anyone who has ever poured a viscous liquid – such as honey on toast – has probably seen some instability. When a small amount of viscous liquid is poured, it tends to pile up like a coil of rope before it seeps over the surface.

Senior researcher Professor Roberto Zenit, from Brown University in the United States, said: & # 39; Like most painters, Jackson Pollock has gone through a long process of experimentation to perfect his technique

Senior researcher Professor Roberto Zenit, from Brown University in the United States, said: & # 39; Like most painters, Jackson Pollock has gone through a long process of experimentation to perfect his technique

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Senior researcher Professor Roberto Zenit, from Brown University in the United States, said: & # 39; Like most painters, Jackson Pollock has gone through a long process of experimentation to perfect his technique

In the context of Pollock & # 39; s technique, Prof Zenit explained that the instability can result in paint filaments that make pigtail-like curls when they are poured out of the can.

Previous research showed that the curved lines in Pollock & # 39; s paintings were a consequence of this instability, but the new study shows the opposite.

Prof. Zenit said: & # 39; What we found is that he moved his hand at a sufficiently high speed and a sufficiently short height so that this rolling up would not take place. & # 39;

He says the findings & # 39; useful & # 39; can be when authenticating Pollock & # 39; s works. Too many tight curls may suggest that a drop-style painting is not a Pollock.

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Prof. Zenit said the findings could also provide information about other institutions in which viscous liquids are stretched into filaments, such as the manufacture of fiberglass.

But he says his greatest interest in the work is that it's just a & # 39; fascinating & # 39; way to investigate interesting questions in fluid mechanics.

Prof. Zenit added: & I consider myself a messenger of fluid mechanics.

& # 39; This is my excuse to talk about science. It is fascinating to see that painters are really fluid engineers, even though they may not know it. & # 39;

The full findings of the study were published in the journal PLOS.

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