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Scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have proven that the tape (photo) worked after testing it on & # 39; challenging & # 39; wounds in rats and pigs

The end of STEKEN? Scientists make double-sided tape that can seal internal wounds together in just FIVE SECONDS

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists proved that the tape worked
  • They tested it on & # 39; challenging & # 39; wounds on the lungs and intestines of rats and pigs
  • Experts say it can be life saving in preventing leaks after a stomach operation
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Surgical sutures can be replaced in one day with a double-sided adhesive tape that can seal wounds in just five seconds.

Scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have proven that the tape worked after testing it on & # 39; challenging & # 39; wounds in rats and pigs.

The tape – made by engineers after spinning inspiration – & # 39; fragile & # 39; fragile tissues such as the lung and intestines.

Experts say it can be life saving in preventing leaks after stomach surgery, which can lead to sepsis and other deadly complications.

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Scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have proven that the tape (photo) worked after testing it on & # 39; challenging & # 39; wounds in rats and pigs

Scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have proven that the tape (photo) worked after testing it on & # 39; challenging & # 39; wounds in rats and pigs

Dr. Xuanhe Zhao, an engineer who helped make the tape, said: “There are more than 230 million major operations around the world every year.

& # 39; Many of them need stitches to close the wound, which can actually cause tissue stress and cause infections, pain and scars. & # 39;

Dr. Zhao added: & # 39; We propose a fundamentally different approach to sealing tissue.

& # 39; Bonding soft or brittle fabrics such as the lung and trachea is very challenging, but with our double-sided tape we can easily seal them within five seconds. & # 39;

The team – inspired by the sticky substance that spiders use to catch prey – also discovered that the tape is faster than surgical adhesives.

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Medical adhesives, used since the 1970s and first used by the military, can take a few minutes to seal tissue.

The tape - made by engineers after spinning inspiration - & # 39; fragile & # 39; fragile tissues such as the lung and intestines

The tape - made by engineers after spinning inspiration - & # 39; fragile & # 39; fragile tissues such as the lung and intestines

The tape – made by engineers after spinning inspiration – & # 39; fragile & # 39; fragile tissues such as the lung and intestines

WHAT ARE THE DOWNSIDEN OF MEDICAL GLUES AND STITCHES?

There are more than 230 million major operations around the world every year, according to experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Many of them need sutures to close the wound, which can actually cause stress on the tissues and cause infections, pain and scars.

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Medical adhesives, used since the 1970s and first used by the military, can take a few minutes to seal tissue.

One of the most important chemicals used in medical adhesives can be toxic to people and cause pain and inflammation in the area where it is used.

Other surgical adhesives are made from water-based gels. These are less toxic, but do not bind with the same strength, doctors have said in the past.

One of the most important chemicals used in medical adhesives can be toxic to people and cause pain and inflammation in the area where it is used.

Other surgical adhesives are made from water-based gels. These are less toxic, but do not bind with the same strength, doctors have said in the past.

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Dr. Zhao and his colleagues have previously made gels that have proven to be stronger than the material that barnacles use to attach to rocks.

But this time they turned their attention to a tape, hoping that it would prove better than stitches and even faster than surgical glue.

The team was inspired by spiders, who produce an adhesive that helps them catch their prey in wet conditions – similar to those of human tissue.

Polysaccharides in the glue absorb water on an insect almost immediately, creating a small dry patch to which the glue sticks.

They were able to simulate this process by using polyacrylic acid, an absorbent material used in diapers. The acid contained chemicals that cause strong bonds.

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Depending on how the tape is used, engineers can determine how quickly it is broken down in the body by varying the ingredients that go into it.

Gelatin tends to break down in the human body within a few days or weeks, while chitosan – found in insect dishes – can last up to a year.

The double-sided tape can also be used to attach implantable medical devices to tissues, including the heart.

Tests with rats showed that the tape held a patch on their hearts for a few days. But more tests are needed, the researchers said.

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