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Experts try to cultivate 5,000-year-old yeast found in clay pots to make the same type of bread that would have been broken by ancient Egyptians

Experts are trying to grow 5,000-year-old yeast found in clay pots to make the same type of bread that would have been broken by the ancient Egyptians.

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The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them.

In the same way, researchers also think they could make old beer.

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Experts try to cultivate 5,000-year-old yeast found in clay pots to make the same type of bread that would have been broken by ancient Egyptians

Experts try to cultivate 5,000-year-old yeast found in clay pots to make the same type of bread that would have been broken by ancient Egyptians

The plan to raise the bread of the elderly was devised by tech developer Seamus Blackley and biologist Richard Bowman of the University of Iowa – the latter of whom has devised a method for collecting microbes from old ceramics without damage.

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& # 39; You gently pump a liquid in with a syringe and some sterile cotton in contact with the ceramic. It penetrates and you suck it out again, & said Mr. Bowman The times.

The solution feeds the microbes, he explained, and added: & # 39; it doesn't take long for these guys to wake up & # 39 ;.

Blackley tasted microbes from bread molds, beer barrels and other artifacts from the collections of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Harvard's Peabody Museum, with help from Egyptologist Serena Love of the University of Queensland.

The collections of the museum in Boston even have a real Egyptian load of bread.

Before a dough can be kneaded, however, the pair must distinguish which of the collected microorganisms are from ancient times and what modern contaminants are from the museum or the archaeologists who dug up the pots.

& # 39; In the biolab, we will characterize and separate the different organisms we harvested from the vessels and breads & # 39 ;, Mr. Blackley wrote on Twitter.

We can then see what is modern, and probably a pollution, and what is old. We will then guess with all monsters what the actual Egyptian mix was. & # 39;

The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them. In the photo, Mr. Blakely worked at home to grow some yeast in his kitchen
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The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them. In the photo, Mr. Blakely worked at home to grow some yeast in his kitchen

The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them. In the photo, Mr. Blakely worked at home to grow some yeast in his kitchen

Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and fed a yeast culture in his kitchen

Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and fed a yeast culture in his kitchen

Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and fed a yeast culture in his kitchen

Blackley believes that those who bake ancient food have painted a bad picture of old baking skills.

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& # 39; They make these flat, disgusting cakes, & # 39; he said to the times.

& # 39; I promise you that a Roman centurio who returns from his absence would kill a baker who would give him something like that. & # 39;

And in ancient Egypt, he added, travelers would encounter three pyramids clad in white limestone. They are dazzling white. You are in the capital of the world. & # 39;

& # 39; These people had no waste food, & # 39; he went on.

& # 39; They loved bread. They were very good at making luxury breads and traditional breads for the army. & # 39;

Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and nourished the culture. & # 39; I was very careful & # 39 ;, he told The Times. & # 39; Those two jars literally burst from the yeast after two days. & # 39;
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Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and nourished the culture. & # 39; I was very careful & # 39 ;, he told The Times. & # 39; Those two jars literally burst from the yeast after two days. & # 39;

Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and nourished the culture. & # 39; I was very careful & # 39 ;, he told The Times. & # 39; Those two jars literally burst from the yeast after two days. & # 39;

Mr. Blakely, however, could not resist keeping some yeast for himself.

& # 39; I took an extra sample for myself, jumping the gun, to take home and trying to cultivate grain directly & # 39 ;, he wrote on Twitter.

Using Khorosan wheat that would have been available to ancient Egyptian bakers, Blakely ground flour and nourished the culture.

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& # 39; I was very careful & # 39 ;, he told The Times.

& # 39; Those two jars literally burst from the yeast after two days. & # 39;

& # 39; Finally, & # 39; he wrote on Twitter, & # 39; we have a pure monster of ancient Egyptian bread yeast if I can figure out how to make it.

& # 39; I hope all those little boys enjoy their first real meal in almost 5,000 years! & # 39;

The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them

The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them

The unusual baking project has been realized thanks to a special procedure for extracting old yeast from artifacts without damaging them

Mr. Blakely reportedly hopes to have his first bread rise in just a few days.

& # 39; I'll try this weekend if I'm lucky & # 39 ;, he told The Times.

& # 39; It's so beautiful for me. You can literally break bread with your ancestors. & # 39;

When they are done baking, they plan to write an academic article describing their research.

WHAT CAN NEW DISCOVERIES IN THE NILE VALLEY REVEAL ABOUT OLD EGYPT?

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Researchers from the University of Chicago recently discovered two old buildings in southern Egypt.

They tell a lot about the history of the country, but they have also asked new questions to archaeologists.

The preservation of one of the buildings is curious for the researchers, who find it strange that the building has not been stripped of its materials after they think it was abandoned.

Depicted is an archaeologist from the University of Chicago who investigates remains of ancient Egypt. Researchers recently found two buildings that were built during a turning point in the country's history: when Pharaohs became interested in provincial regions

Depicted is an archaeologist from the University of Chicago who investigates remains of ancient Egypt. Researchers recently found two buildings that were built during a turning point in the country's history: when Pharaohs became interested in provincial regions

Depicted is an archaeologist from the University of Chicago who investigates remains of ancient Egypt. Researchers recently found two buildings that were built during a turning point in the country's history: when Pharaohs became interested in provincial regions

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The trend at the time was to take all usable materials when leaving buildings, but the building remained untouched. This is strange considering that wood was a rarity in the region.

Researcher Nadine Moeller said: & # 39; s so unique site. We have found it difficult to find architectural parallels because no other settlement in Upper Egypt has so many elaborate remains from this period. We have learned so much and there is more to come. & # 39;

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