Scientists find 125 million-year-old fossilized remains of superpterosaurus

Scientists find 125 million-year-old fossilized remains of superpterosaurus with a wingspan of 20 feet that could have been one of the largest species ever in the air

  • The Hatzegopteryx fossil has shed new light on this beautiful winged species
  • It was discovered by Robert Coram embedded in the cliffs of the Isle of Wight
  • Huge pterosaurs ruled the sky about 150 million years 125 million years ago
Advertisements

With a wingspan of 20 feet and a weight of 650 pounds, the giant pterosaurus cast an impressive figure that dives through the air of the Jurassic era.

And 125 million years later, the huge size of the beast continues to amaze scientists who have found the remains of one of the beasts deep in the cliffs of the Isle of Wight.

The fossil of Hatzegopteryx has shed new light on this beautiful species that some believe was the greatest flying creature of the period.

It is believed that these flying monsters have ruled the air for about 150 million years, during which time they have evolved from rodent size to a figure similar to a modern fighter jet.

Advertisements

Equipped with an extended jaw, the giant pterosaurus - who hunted dinosaurs - would break and kill their prey

Equipped with an extended jaw, the giant pterosaurus – who hunted dinosaurs – would break and kill their prey

With a wingspan of 20 feet and a weight of 300 kg, the giant pterosaurus cast an impressive figure that dives through the air of the Jurassic era

With a wingspan of 20 feet and a weight of 300 kg, the giant pterosaurus cast an impressive figure that dives through the air of the Jurassic era

With a wingspan of 20 feet and a weight of 300 kg, the giant pterosaurus cast an impressive figure that dives through the air of the Jurassic era

The find was made by the British Fossils chief Robert Coram who said: & # 39; It is perhaps the largest flying creature that has lived so far & # 39 ;, said the Sunday Times.

The Isle of Wight is rich in fossils and is visited by dinosaur lovers who comb the south side for remains.

Coram added: & # 39; We think this is one of the first superpterosaurs. The Isle of Wight is widely expected by people almost every day, so it's a matter of being able to see the little things that they can't. & # 39;

Advertisements

Equipped with an extended jaw, the giant pterosaurus – who hunted dinosaurs – would break and kill their prey.

In an article with Professor David Martill of Portsmouth University, he wrote: & # 39; A morphometric analysis suggests an original span of approximately 5.6 m.

The fossil of Hatzegopteryx on the southwest coast of the Isle of Wight (photo) has shed new light on this beautiful species that some believe was the largest flying creature of the period.

The fossil of Hatzegopteryx on the southwest coast of the Isle of Wight (photo) has shed new light on this beautiful species that some believe was the largest flying creature of the period.

The fossil of Hatzegopteryx on the southwest coast of the Isle of Wight (photo) has shed new light on this beautiful species that some believe was the largest flying creature of the period.

It is believed that these flying monsters ruled the air for about 150 million years, during which time they evolved from rodent size to a figure similar to a modern fighter jet

It is believed that these flying monsters ruled the air for about 150 million years, during which time they evolved from rodent size to a figure similar to a modern fighter jet

Advertisements

It is believed that these flying monsters ruled the air for about 150 million years, during which time they evolved from rodent size to a figure similar to a modern fighter jet

& # 39; with an early Barremian age, this pterosaurus would have been a giant for its time. & # 39;

Pterosaurs – also called pterodactyls – existed alongside and at the same time as dinosaurs.

Because of their gigantic size, paleobiologists have long wondered how the creatures managed to take off, because their masses would suggest that generating sufficient momentum would be impossible.

But 3D models have now shown that bulging leg muscles and flexible wing structure enabled the giant pterosaurus to jump into the air.

Advertisements

Michael Habib from the University of Southern California wrote: & # 39; Unlike birds, which only walk and jump with their hind legs in the air, pterosaurs were on all fours.

& # 39; Mathematical modeling indicates that launching from a quadrangular posture – first depositing with the hind legs and then with the front legs – would have yielded the leaping power giant pterosaurs needed for takeoff. & # 39;

WHAT WERE PTEROSAURS?

Neither birds nor bats or pterosaurs were reptiles who ruled heaven in the Jura and Cretaceous.

Scientists have long debated where pterosaurs fit on the evolutionary tree.

Today's leading theory is that pterosaurs, dinosaurs, and crocodiles are closely related and belong to a group known as archosaurus, but this is still unconfirmed.

Neither birds nor bats, pterosaurs, were reptiles who ruled heaven in the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods (impression of the artist depicted)
Advertisements

Neither birds nor bats, pterosaurs, were reptiles who ruled heaven in the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods (impression of the artist depicted)

Neither birds nor bats, pterosaurs, were reptiles who ruled heaven in the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods (impression of the artist depicted)

Pterosaurs evolved into dozens of species. Some were as large as an F-16 fighter jet and others as small as a sparrow.

They were the first animals after insects to evolve: not only jumping or sliding, but also with their wings flying to generate lift and travel through the air.

Pterosaurs had hollow bones, large brains with well-developed optic lobes, and various tips on their bones to which fly muscles were attached.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news

- Advertisement -