Scientists discover the world's most mature cheese: 7,200-year-old remains of & # 039; feta & # 039; they find each other

Scientists have discovered the world's most mature cheese, made in Croatia more than 7,000 years ago. In the photo there are examples of types of Neolithic Dalmatian ceramics

Scientists have discovered the world's most mature cheese, made in Croatia by Neolithic farmers more than 7,000 years ago.

During the excavations of ancient pottery, researchers found traces of a feta cheese in the remains of the horns to drink ritons and sieves dating from 5300 BC.

Access to fresh milk and cheese has been linked to the expansion of agriculture across Europe, which began about 9,000 years ago.

But until now, the evidence of cheese production in the Mediterranean dates back to the early Bronze Age, about 5,000 years ago.

The latest discovery pushes back previous estimates of when cheese production began among the first human settlements in more than 2,000 years.

Researchers believe that milk and cheese production in Europe's early farmers reduced infant mortality and helped stimulate the demographic changes that drove farming communities to expand to northern latitudes.

Scientists have discovered the world's most mature cheese, made in Croatia more than 7,000 years ago. In the photo there are examples of types of Neolithic Dalmatian ceramics

Scientists have discovered the world's most mature cheese, made in Croatia more than 7,000 years ago. In the photo there are examples of types of Neolithic Dalmatian ceramics

WHEN DID PEOPLE BEGIN TO MAKE CHEESE?

During the excavations of ancient pottery, researchers found traces of a feta cheese in the remains of horns and rhytm screens dating from 5300 BC.

Access to milk and cheese has been linked to the expansion of agriculture across Europe about 9,000 years ago.

The two towns, Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj, were occupied between 6000 and 4800 BC and have various types of pottery in that period.

The residents of these villages seem to have used specific types of ceramics for the production of different foods, with cheese residues being the most common in rhyta and sieves.

According to the latest findings, cheese was established in the Mediterranean 7,200 years ago.

Fermented milk products were easier to store for Neolithic humans and had a relatively low lactose content.

It would have been an important source of nutrition for all ages in the first agricultural populations.

Therefore, the authors suggest that cheese production and associated ceramic technology were key factors that helped the expansion of the first farmers in northern and central Europe.

Researchers led by Sarah McClure of Pennsylvania State University analyzed stable carbon isotopes of fatty acids preserved in ceramic fragments (pieces of ceramic material) from two Neolithic villages on the Dalmatian coast east of the Adriatic Sea.

The two villages, Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj, were occupied between 6000 BC and 4800 BC and have various types of ceramics in that period, according to research published in Plos One.

The scientists found evidence that milk, along with meat and fish, are consumed throughout this period and evidence that cheese started around 5,200BC.

"The evidence we have comes from the fatty acids that remain as residues in the pottery, so we do not know how the cheese would have tasted, it was probably a soft and firm cheese, something like a farmer's cheese or feta cheese" said Dr. McClure to MailOnline.

"Since these were farmers who grew wheat, I imagine they would have eaten it as it is, possibly with unleavened bread, stews, roasts, porridge and fruit.

"I think he understood it pretty quickly, since it's an excellent food that can be stored for a while and is quite nutritious," he said.

The residents of these villages seem to have used specific types of ceramics for the production of different foods, with cheese residues being the most common in rhyta and sieves.

According to the latest findings, cheese was established in the Mediterranean 7,200 years ago.

Fermented milk products were easier to store for Neolithic humans and had a relatively low lactose content.

The newspaper would have been a crucial source of nutrition for all ages in the first agricultural populations.

Scientists believe that cheese production and associated ceramic technology were key factors in helping the expansion of the first farmers in northern and central Europe.

On the image is the archaeological site of Pokrovnik during the excavation with the modern village, Dalmatia, Croatia. During ancient pottery excavations, researchers found residues of a feta cheese in the remnants of horns and rhytm screens dating to 5300BC.

On the image is the archaeological site of Pokrovnik during the excavation with the modern village, Dalmatia, Croatia. During ancient pottery excavations, researchers found residues of a feta cheese in the remnants of horns and rhytm screens dating to 5300BC.

On the image is the archaeological site of Pokrovnik during the excavation with the modern village, Dalmatia, Croatia. During ancient pottery excavations, researchers found residues of a feta cheese in the remnants of horns and rhytm screens dating to 5300BC.

Researchers led by Sarah McClure of Pennsylvania State University analyzed stable carbon isotopes of fatty acids preserved in ceramic fragments (pieces of ceramic material). Access to milk and cheese has been linked to the expansion of agriculture across Europe about 9,000 years ago (pictured)

Researchers led by Sarah McClure of Pennsylvania State University analyzed stable carbon isotopes of fatty acids preserved in ceramic fragments (pieces of ceramic material). Access to milk and cheese has been linked to the expansion of agriculture across Europe about 9,000 years ago (pictured)

Researchers led by Sarah McClure of Pennsylvania State University analyzed stable carbon isotopes of fatty acids preserved in ceramic fragments (pieces of ceramic material). Access to milk and cheese has been linked to the expansion of agriculture across Europe about 9,000 years ago (pictured)

This research is the first evidence of cheese production through identified stages of milk fermentation in functionally specific vessels in the Mediterranean region more than 7,000 years ago.

The oldest cheese outside of Europe was found last month in an Egyptian tomb of 3,200 years old.

The cheese was buried next to Ptahmes, mayor of the ancient Egyptian capital of Memphis, whose resting place was rediscovered in 2010 after being lost under the desert sand for millennia.

The two villages, Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj, were occupied between 6000 and 4800 BC and have several types of ceramics in that age range, according to the research.

The two villages, Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj, were occupied between 6000 and 4800 BC and have several types of ceramics in that age range, according to the research.

The two villages, Pokrovnik and Danilo Bitinj, were occupied between 6000 and 4800 BC and have several types of ceramics in that age range, according to the research.

A jar contained a solidified whitish mass, as well as parts of a canvas cloth that is believed to have once covered the top of the jar in an attempt to preserve its contents.

The peptides detected during the analysis of the jar revealed that the sample was a dairy product made with cow's milk and goat's or sheep's milk.

"The characteristics of the canvas fabric, which indicate that it was adequate to contain a solid rather than a liquid, and the absence of other specific markers, support the conclusion that the dairy product was a solid cheese," the researchers said. They were guided by the University of Catania, in Italy.

Other peptides in the food sample suggest that it was contaminated with Brucella melitensis, a bacterium that causes brucellosis.

This life-threatening disease spreads from animals to people, usually by eating unpasteurized dairy products.

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