Scientists detect a new form: 3D shape called & # 039; scutoid & # 039; allows cells to join without wasting energy

A team that studies the cells that give rise to embryos and can be found lining up our organs and blood vessels identified a three-dimensional shape that occurs when they bend and come together

Researchers have discovered a new geometric shape that has been hiding in plain sight.

A team that studies the cells that give rise to embryos and can be found lining up our organs and blood vessels identified a three-dimensional shape that occurs when they bend and come together.

The new form, called scutoid, allows these epithelial cells to be organized with the greatest efficiency, unlike the column or bottle shapes that scientists previously attributed to this process.

A team that studies the cells that give rise to embryos and can be found lining up our organs and blood vessels identified a three-dimensional shape that occurs when they bend and come together

A team that studies the cells that give rise to embryos and can be found lining up our organs and blood vessels identified a three-dimensional shape that occurs when they bend and come together

Epithelial cells are the basic components of embryonic development, and must withstand the twisting and packing that occurs as organs are formed.

In the new study, the researchers found that the process is based on a previously undescribed form, which allows cells to maintain maximum stability while conserving energy.

To get to the bottom of their nature, the researchers used computational models based on the Voronoi layout.

"During the modeling process, the results we saw were strange," said Javier Buceta, of Lehigh University.

"Our model predicted that as the curvature of the tissue increases, the columns and shapes of the bottles were not the only ways that the cells could develop.

"To our surprise, the additional form did not even have a name in mathematics, one does not normally have the opportunity to name a new form.

The new form, called scutoid, allows these epithelial cells to be organized with the greatest efficiency, unlike the column or bottle shapes that scientists previously attributed to this process.

The new form, called scutoid, allows these epithelial cells to be organized with the greatest efficiency, unlike the column or bottle shapes that scientists previously attributed to this process.

The new form, called scutoid, allows these epithelial cells to be organized with the greatest efficiency, unlike the column or bottle shapes that scientists previously attributed to this process.

The team analyzed the three-dimensional packing of tissues in different animals and found that they adopted the shapes predicted by the model.

They call the newly identified form the scutellum after the scrawny shield of the thorax of a beetle.

"We have unlocked the solution of nature to achieve efficient epithelial flexion," says Buceta.

According to the researchers, the form makes the method of cellular organization more efficient in terms of energy.

WHAT IS THE SHAPE & # 39; SCUTOID & # 39 ;?

Epithelial cells are the basic components of embryonic development, and must withstand the twisting and packing that occurs as organs are formed.

A team that studies these cells, which can be found by lining up our organs and blood vessels, identified a three-dimensional shape that occurs when they bend and come together.

The researchers discovered that the process is based on a previously unnamed form called scutoid, which allows cells to maintain maximum stability while conserving energy.

They call it Scouting after the scuffle of a beetle's thorax.

The scutoid form allows cells to join without wasting energy. They are calling the newly identified form, the sputum after the scutellum of the thorax of a beetle (picture e in the diagram above)

The scutoid form allows cells to join without wasting energy. They are calling the newly identified form, the sputum after the scutellum of the thorax of a beetle (picture e in the diagram above)

The scutoid form allows cells to join without wasting energy. They are calling the newly identified form, the sputum after the scutellum of the thorax of a beetle (picture e in the diagram above)

Previously, it was believed that the cells assumed a columnar or bottle-shaped shape when they came together.

"In addition to this fundamental aspect of morphogenesis, the ability to design tissues and organs in the future depends critically on the ability to understand, and then control, the three-dimensional organization of cells," the authors wrote in the study.

The discovery could be beneficial in tissue engineering, say the researchers.

"For example," Buceta says, "if you're looking to grow artificial organs, this discovery could help you build a scaffold to encourage this kind of cell packing, accurately imitating the way nature develops tissues efficiently."

(function() {
var _fbq = window._fbq || (window._fbq = []);
if (!_fbq.loaded) {
var fbds = document.createElement(‘script’);
fbds.async = true;
fbds.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbds.js”;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(fbds, s);
_fbq.loaded = true;
}
_fbq.push([‘addPixelId’, ‘1401367413466420’]);
})();
window._fbq = window._fbq || [];
window._fbq.push([“track”, “PixelInitialized”, {}]);
.