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The submarine from World War I covering the bay of Magdalena, Mexico, while being inspected by divers from the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History

Incredible 3D simulation shows US Navy WWI submarine lying on the seabed after it hits a school and sank into a Mexican bay in 1920

  • The USS H-1 was the first submarine in its class to be produced by the US Navy
  • The ship was launched in 1913 and patrolled along the west coast of the US and Long Island
  • Submarine got stuck in a school off the bay of Magdalena, Mexico in March 1920
  • Mexican scientists have produced a 3D model of the submarine to study the ship
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Scientists have succeeded in imitating a 3D model of a US Navy submarine from the WWI era that sank into a bay off the coast of Mexico while patrolling the coast.

Known as USS H-1, the ship was the first American H-class submarines to be named Seawolf when it was launched in 1913 and operated during the First World War.

All four sailors on board died as they tried to reach the coast when it ran aground in 1920 on a shallow after they had passed the Panama Canal.

The submarine was from Magdalena Bay when the four soldiers aboard, including Commander Lieutenant Commander James R Webb, were killed.

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Experts from the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) produced a 3D recreation of the USS H-1 wreck after taking thousands of underwater photos.

The submarine from World War I covering the bay of Magdalena, Mexico, while being inspected by divers from the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History

The submarine from World War I covering the bay of Magdalena, Mexico, while being inspected by divers from the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History

Model: The 3D image of the submarine while it is sitting on the seabed after it sank in 1920

Model: The 3D image of the submarine while it is sitting on the seabed after it sank in 1920

Model: The 3D image of the submarine while it is sitting on the seabed after it sank in 1920

The H-1 and H-2 in Coos Bay, Oregon, on an undated photo during the time of the submarine patrolling the west coast of the US

The H-1 and H-2 in Coos Bay, Oregon, on an undated photo during the time of the submarine patrolling the west coast of the US

The H-1 and H-2 in Coos Bay, Oregon, on an undated photo during the time of the submarine patrolling the west coast of the US

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The USS H-1 was launched on May 6, 1913 and was used for patrolling the west coast of the US, usually under the guidance of an H-2 submarine.

When it was launched, the ship was attached to Torpedo Flotilla 2 of the Pacific Fleet and was sometimes accompanied by sister ships H-2 and H-3.

After leaving his base in San Pedro, California, the H-1 spent the remainder of patrolling Long Island Sound and often had officer students from the submarine school on board.

The ship sank on March 12, 1920, while the US authorities tried to take it off the rocks, and further rescue attempts were abandoned.

Roberto Junco, the head of the Underwater Archeology Branch (SAS), told local media that the project, conducted in collaboration with the American archaeologist George Schwarz, aims to study and conserve the WWI-era ship.

Divers measure the H-1 submarine off the coast of Mexico as part of collecting measurements to make the 3D model
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Divers measure the H-1 submarine off the coast of Mexico as part of collecting measurements to make the 3D model

Divers measure the H-1 submarine off the coast of Mexico as part of collecting measurements to make the 3D model

Scientists succeeded in recreating the 3D model (photo) of a US Navy Seawolf submarine by measuring it underwater

Scientists succeeded in recreating the 3D model (photo) of a US Navy Seawolf submarine by measuring it underwater

Scientists succeeded in recreating the 3D model (photo) of a US Navy Seawolf submarine by measuring it underwater

Divers took measurements from every aspect of the WWI-era ship to create the detailed image

Divers took measurements from every aspect of the WWI-era ship to create the detailed image

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Divers took measurements from every aspect of the WWI-era ship to create the detailed image

The H-1 can be seen (above) in front of the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, on January 30, 1914, during the First World War

The H-1 can be seen (above) in front of the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, on January 30, 1914, during the First World War

The H-1 can be seen (above) in front of the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, on January 30, 1914, during the First World War

Junco said experts could measure and photograph the ship 14 meters under water during two different dives in 2017 and 2018.

He added: & # 39; The H-1 had thousands of full-length & width photos taken and the images were then placed in a computer program to create a 3D version. & # 39;

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According to reports, the subsequent 3D model allows experts to carefully study the wreck and assess its condition, as well as potential areas where it has been looted in the past.

The 3D model (photo) allows researchers to accurately study the wreck of the submarine and train its condition

The 3D model (photo) allows researchers to accurately study the wreck of the submarine and train its condition

The 3D model (photo) allows researchers to accurately study the wreck of the submarine and train its condition

All four sailors aboard the H-1 died when they ran aground at a school off the coast of Mexico. Shown is one of the divers taking measurements

All four sailors aboard the H-1 died when they ran aground at a school off the coast of Mexico. Shown is one of the divers taking measurements

All four sailors aboard the H-1 died when they ran aground at a school off the coast of Mexico. Shown is one of the divers taking measurements

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